Search results for: yankee-warhorse

Yankee Warhorse

Author : Mary Bobbitt Townsend
File Size : 64.98 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 554
Read : 426
Download »
A German-born Union officer in the American Civil War, Maj. Gen. Peter Osterhaus served from the first clash in the western theater until the final surrender of the war. Osterhaus made a name for himself within the army as an energetic and resourceful commander who led his men from the front. He was one of the last surviving Union major general and military governor of Mississippi in the early days of Reconstruction. This first full-length study of the officer documents how, despite his meteoric military career, his accomplishments were underreported even in his own day and often misrepresented in the historical record. Mary Bobbitt Townsend corrects previous errors about his life and offers new insights into his contributions to major turning points in the war at Vicksburg, Chattanooga, and Atlanta, as well as other battles. Townsend draws on battle reports not found in the Official Records, on personal papers, and on other nonpublished material to examine Osterhaus’s part in the major battles in the West as well as in minor engagements. She tells how he came into his own in the Vicksburg campaign and proved himself through skill with artillery, expertise in intelligence gathering, and taking the lead in hostile territory—blazing the trail down the west side of the river for the entire Union army and then covering Grant’s back for a month during the siege. At Chattanooga, Osterhaus helped Joe Hooker strategize the rout at Lookout Mountain; at Atlanta, he led the Fifteenth Corps, the largest of the four corps making Sherman's March to the Sea. Townsend also documents his contributions in the battles of Wilson's Creek, Pea Ridge, Arkansas Post, Port Gibson, Ringgold Gap, and Resaca and shows that he played a crucial role in Canby’s Mobile Bay operations at the end of the war. In addition to reporting Osterhaus’s wartime experiences, Townsend describes his experiences as a leader in the 1848–1849 Rebellion in his native Germany, his frustration during his term as Mississippi’s governor, and his stint as U.S. consul to France during the Franco-Prussian War. Osterhaus stood out from other volunteer officers in his understanding of tactics and logistics, even though his careful field preparation led to criticism by historians that he was unduly cautious in battle. Yankee Warhorse sets the record straight on this important Civil War general as it opens a new window on the war in the West.

The Vicksburg Assaults May 19 22 1863

Author : Steven E. Woodworth
File Size : 63.14 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 160
Read : 718
Download »
After a series of victories through Mississippi early in the spring of 1863, General Ulysses S. Grant’s Army of the Tennessee had reached the critical point in its campaign to capture Vicksburg. Taking the city on the hill would allow the Union to control the Mississippi River and would divide the Confederacy in half. Confederate morale was low, and a Union victory in the war appeared close before the start of Grant’s assault against General John C. Pemberton’s Army of Mississippi. But due to difficult terrain, strong defenses, and uncoordinated movements, the quick triumph Grant desired was unattainable. On the afternoon of May 19, with little rest, preparation, or reconnaissance, Union forces charged the Confederate lines only to be repulsed. A respite between the assaults allowed both sides to reinforce their positions. Early on May 22 the Union artillery sought to soften the stronghold’s defenses before the general attack, but despite the Union forces’ preparation, the fighting proved even more disorganized and vicious. Again Grant failed to move Pemberton. Not wanting to risk more soldiers in a third attack, Grant conceded to the necessity of laying siege. Confederate morale climbed as the Southerners realized they had held their ground against an overwhelming force. Editors Steven E. Woodworth and Charles D. Grear have assembled five captivating essays that examine Grant’s unsuccessful assaults against Confederate defensive lines around Vicksburg. Ranging from military to social history, the essays further historical debates on prominent topics, such as the reactions of Midwesterners to the first failures of Grant’s Vicksburg campaign. Two essays from opposing sides analyze the controversial decisions surrounding the Railroad Redoubt, the site of the bloodiest fighting on May 22. Another investigates how the tenacity of Texan reinforcements forced Union soldiers to abandon their gains. Peppered with first-hand observations and bolstered by an impressive depth of research, this anthology is an invitingly written account and comprehensive assessment. By zeroing in on the two assaults, the contributors offer essential clarity and understanding of these important events within the larger scope of the Civil War’s Vicksburg Campaign.

The Impulse of Victory

Author : David Alan Powell
File Size : 83.55 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 247
Read : 656
Download »
How Grant secured a Tennessee victory and a promotion Union soldiers in the Army of the Cumberland, who were trapped and facing starvation or surrender in the fall of 1863, saw the arrival of Major General Ulysses S. Grant in Tennessee as an impetus to reverse the tides of war. David A. Powell’s sophisticated strategic and operational analysis of Grant’s command decisions and actions shows how his determined leadership relieved the siege and shattered the enemy, resulting in the creation of a new strategic base of Union operations and Grant’s elevation to commander of all the Federal armies the following year. Powell’s detailed exploration of the Union Army of the Cumberland’s six-week-long campaign for Chattanooga is complemented by his careful attention to the personal issues Grant faced at the time and his relationships with his superiors and subordinates. Though unfamiliar with the tactical situation, the army, and its officers, Grant delivered another resounding victory. His success, explains Powell, was due to his tactical flexibility, communication with his superiors, perseverance despite setbacks, and dogged determination to win the campaign. Through attention to postwar accounts, Powell reconciles the differences between what happened and the participants’ memories of the events. He focuses throughout on Grant’s controversial decisions, showing how they were made and their impact on the campaign. As Powell shows, Grant’s choices demonstrate how he managed to be a thoughtful, deliberate commander despite the fog of war.

The Limits of Loyalty

Author : Jarret Ruminski
File Size : 58.47 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 175
Read : 882
Download »
Jarret Ruminski examines ordinary lives in Confederate-controlled Mississippi to show how military occupation and the ravages of war tested the meaning of loyalty during America's greatest rift. The extent of southern loyalty to the Confederate States of America has remained a subject of historical contention that has resulted in two conflicting conclusions: one, southern patriotism was either strong enough to carry the Confederacy to the brink of victory, or two, it was so weak that the Confederacy was doomed to crumble from internal discord. Mississippi, the home state of Confederate President Jefferson Davis, should have been a hotbed of Confederate patriotism. The reality was much more complicated. Ruminski breaks the weak/strong loyalty impasse by looking at how people from different backgrounds--women and men, white and black, enslaved and free, rich and poor--negotiated the shifting contours of loyalty in a state where Union occupation turned everyday activities into potential tests of patriotism. While the Confederate government demanded total national loyalty from its citizenry, this study focuses on wartime activities such as swearing the Union oath, illegally trading with the Union army, and deserting from the Confederate army to show how Mississippians acted on multiple loyalties to self, family, and nation. Ruminski also probes the relationship between race and loyalty to indicate how an internal war between slaves and slaveholders defined Mississippi's social development well into the twentieth century.

Kansas History

Author :
File Size : 80.87 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 820
Read : 511
Download »

Migrants and the Making of the Urban Maritime World

Author : Christina Reimann
File Size : 35.97 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 798
Read : 757
Download »
This volume explores the mutually transformative relations between migrants and port cities. Throughout the ages of sail and steam, port cities served as nodes of long-distance transmissions and exchanges. Commercial goods, people, animals, seeds, bacteria and viruses; technological and scientific knowledge and fashions all arrived in, and moved through, these microcosms of the global. Migrants made vital contributions to the construction of the urban-maritime world in terms of the built environment, the particular sociocultural milieu, and contemporary representations of these spaces. Port cities, in turn, conditioned the lives of these mobile people, be they seafarers, traders, passers-through, or people in search of a new home. By focusing on migrants—their actions and how they were acted upon—the authors seek to capture the contradictions and complexities that characterized port cities: mobility and immobility, acceptance and rejection, nationalism and cosmopolitanism, diversity and homogeneity, segregation and interaction. The book offers a wide geographical perspective, covering port cities on three continents. Its chapters deal with agency in a widened sense, considering the activities of individuals and collectives as well as the decisive impact of sailing and steamboats, trains, the built environment, goods or microbes in shaping urban-maritime spaces.

Of Times and Race

Author : Michael B. Ballard
File Size : 39.48 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 782
Read : 1129
Download »
Of Times and Race contains eight essays on African American history from the Jacksonian era through the early twentieth century. Taken together, these essays, inspired by noted scholar John F. Marszalek, demonstrate the many nuances of African Americans' struggle to grasp freedom, respect, assimilation, and basic rights of American citizens. Essays include Mark R. Cheathem's look at Andrew Jackson Donelson's struggle to keep his plantations operating within the ever-growing debate over slavery in mid-nineteenth century America. Thomas D. Cockrell examines Southern Unionism during the Civil War and wrestles with the difficulty of finding hard evidence due to sparse sources. Stephen S. Michot examines issues of race in Lafourche Parish, Louisiana, and finds that blacks involved themselves in both armies, curiously clouding issues of slavery and freedom. Michael B. Ballard delves into how Mississippi slaves and Union soldiers interacted during the Vicksburg campaign. Union treatment of freedmen and of U. S. colored troops demonstrated that blacks escaping slavery were not always welcomed. Horace Nash finds that sports, especially boxing, played a fascinating role in blending black and white relations in the West during the early twentieth century. Timothy Smith explores the roles of African Americans who participated in the work of the Civilian Conservation Corps during the creation of the Shiloh National Military Park. James Scott Humphreys analyzes the efforts of two twentieth-century historians who wished to debunk the old, racist views of Reconstruction known as the Dunning school of interpretation. Edna Green Medford provides a concluding essay that ties together the essays in the book and addresses the larger themes running throughout the text.

Civil War Siege of Jackson Mississippi The

Author : Jim Woodrick
File Size : 44.96 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 117
Read : 1203
Download »
Even after a grueling forty-seven-day siege at Vicksburg, Ulysses S. Grant could not rest on his laurels. Just fifty miles away in Jackson, Confederate general Joseph E. Johnston and the "Army of Relief" still posed a threat to Grant's hard-won victory. General William Tecumseh Sherman countered by marching Union troops to Jackson. After a weeklong siege under a hot Mississippi sun, Johnston's army abandoned the city, leaving the fate of Jackson in the hands of Sherman's troops. Historian Jim Woodrick recounts the Civil War devastation and rebirth of Mississippi's capital.

The Decision Was Always My Own

Author : Timothy B Smith
File Size : 69.39 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 397
Read : 518
Download »
The Vicksburg Campaign, argues Timothy B. Smith, is the showcase of Ulysses S. Grant’s military genius. From October 1862 to July 1863, for nearly nine months, Grant tried repeatedly to capture the Confederate river city. He maneuvered and adapted numerous times, reacting to events and enemy movements with great skill and finesse as the lengthy campaign played out on a huge chessboard, dwarfing operations in the east. Grant’s final, daring move allowed him to land an army in Mississippi and fight his way to the gates of Vicksburg. He captured the Confederate garrison and city on July 4, 1863, opening the Mississippi River for the Union. Showing how and why Grant became such a successful general, Smith presents a fast-paced reexamination of the commander and the campaign. His fresh analysis of Grant’s decision-making process during the Vicksburg maneuvers, battles, and siege details the course of campaigning on military, political, administrative, and personal levels. The narrative is organized around Grant’s eight key decisions: to begin operations against Vicksburg, to place himself in personal charge of the campaign, to begin active operations around the city, to sweep toward Vicksburg from the south, to march east of Vicksburg and cut the railroad before attacking, to assault Vicksburg twice in an attempt to end the campaign quickly, to lay siege after the assaults had failed, and to parole the surrendered Confederate garrison rather than send the Southern soldiers to prison camps. The successful military campaign also required Grant to master political efforts, including handling Lincoln’s impatience and dealing with the troublesome political general John A. McClernand. Further, he had to juggle administrative work with military decision making. Grant was more than a military genius, however; he was also a husband and a father, and Smith shows how Grant’s family was a part of everything he did. Grant’s nontraditional choices went against the accepted theories of war, supply, and operations as well as against the chief thinkers of the day, such as Henry Halleck, Grant’s superior. Yet Grant pulled off the victory in compelling fashion. In the first in-depth examination in decades, Smith shows how Grant’s decisions created and won the Civil War’s most brilliant, complex, decisive, and lengthy campaign.

Journal of the Civil War Era

Author : William A. Blair
File Size : 60.23 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 369
Read : 247
Download »
The Journal of the Civil War Era Volume 2, Number 4 December 2012 TABLE OF CONTENTS Articles Mark Fleszar "My Laborers in Haiti are not Slaves": Proslavery Fictions and a Black Colonization Experiment on the Northern Coast, 1835-1846 Jarret Ruminski "Tradyville": The Contraband Trade and the Problem of Loyalty in Civil War Mississippi K. Stephen Prince Legitimacy and Interventionism: Northern Republicans, the "Terrible Carpetbagger," and the Retreat from Reconstruction Review Essay Roseanne Currarino Toward a History of Cultural Economy Professional Notes T. Lloyd Benson Geohistory: Democratizing the Landscape of Battle Book Reviews Books Received Notes on Contributors The Journal of the Civil War Era takes advantage of the flowering of research on the many issues raised by the sectional crisis, war, Reconstruction, and memory of the conflict, while bringing fresh understanding to the struggles that defined the period, and by extension, the course of American history in the nineteenth century.

The Battle of Pea Ridge

Author : James R. Knight
File Size : 63.45 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 675
Read : 235
Download »
After months of reverses, the Union army is going on the offensive in the early spring of 1862. In Virginia, Gen. McClellan is preparing for his Peninsula Campaign; in Tennessee, Gen. Grant has just captured Ft. Henry and Ft. Donelson; and in southwestern Missouri, Gen. Samuel R. Curtis has driven Sterling Price and his Missouri State Guard out of the state and into the arms of Gen. Ben McCulloch's Confederate army in northwestern Arkansas. Using the united armies of Price and McCulloch, the new Confederate department commander, Earl Van Dorn, strikes back at Curtis' Federal army which is now outnumbered and two hundred miles from its supply base. For two days in early March 1862, the armies of Van Dorn and Curtis fight in the wilds of the Ozark Mountains at a place called Pea Ridge. Control of northern Arkansas and southern Missouri for the rest of the war hangs on the outcome.

Memories of Yankee Stadium

Author : Scott Pitoniak
File Size : 48.45 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 504
Read : 1154
Download »
At the end of the 2008 season, Yankee Stadium will be closing its doors, and in memory of this illustrious stadium, this tribute provide fans with hundreds of anecdotes about the iconic ballpark through the eyes of both those who performed there and the many others who were spectators. Stories shared by those who worked, played, rooted or cheered there, grace the pages of this memento, including Billy Crystal witnessing a monster home run by Mickey Mantle at his first game at Yankee Stadium on May 30, 1956; Bob Costas following the Yankees and his favorite player Mickey Mantle in the 1950s; Ernie Harwell calling both football and baseball games at Yankee Stadium; and Keith Olbermann going to games and chasing foul balls in the late 1960s. Filled with interesting facts and heartwarming stories, "Memories of Yankee Stadium" is a special gift for all of those who want to remember forever the beloved Yankee Stadium the way it was.

Missouri Historical Review

Author :
File Size : 83.11 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 661
Read : 955
Download »

Journal of Illinois History

Author :
File Size : 76.38 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 988
Read : 809
Download »

America s Longest Run

Author : Andrew Davis
File Size : 48.19 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 602
Read : 853
Download »
America&’s Longest Run: A History of the Walnut Street Theatre traces the history of America&’s oldest theater. The Philadelphia landmark has been at or near the center of theatrical activity since it opened, as a circus, on February 2, 1809. This book documents the players and productions that appeared at this venerable house and the challenges the Walnut has faced from economic crises, changing tastes, technological advances, and competition from new media. The Walnut&’s history is a classic American success story. Built in the early years of the nineteenth century, the Walnut responded to the ever-changing tastes and desires of the theatergoing public. Originally operated as a stock company, the Walnut has offered up every conceivable form of entertainment&—pageantry and spectacle, opera, melodrama, musical theater, and Shakespeare. It escaped the wrecking ball during the Depression by operating as a burlesque house, a combination film and vaudeville house, and a Yiddish theater, before becoming the Philadelphia headquarters for the Federal Theatre Project. Because Philadelphia is located so close to New York City, the Walnut has served as a tryout house for many Broadway-bound shows, including A Streetcar Named Desire, The Diary of Anne Frank, and A Raisin in the Sun. Today, the Walnut operates as a nonprofit performing arts center. It is one of the most successful producing theaters in the country, with more than 350,000 attending performances each year.

DiMaggio s Yankees

Author : Lew Freedman
File Size : 89.35 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 889
Read : 1310
Download »
When Babe Ruth left the New York Yankees in 1935, some feared that the loss would cripple the club for years. However, the post–Ruth era Yankees continued to dominate until the start of World War II. Their forward-thinking administrative staff signed and developed top-flight talent like Joe DiMaggio and retained superstars like Lou Gehrig, who remained the greatest first baseman in the game until he succumbed to amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. This history of the Yankees from 1936 to late into World War II details the team’s swift recovery from losing Ruth and reintroduces unheralded players, examines the personal styles of the key men, and chronicles the team’s remarkable achievements, including six American League pennants in eight years and five World Series victories.

The Ultimate Yankee Book

Author : Harvey Frommer
File Size : 32.15 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 257
Read : 500
Download »
The perfect gift for the diehard fan, an enviable treasure for yourself, The Ultimate Yankee Book is the most current and comprehensive source of trivia, people and stories from the team’s creation in 1901 to today. Harvey Frommer, the celebrated baseball historian and author of eight books about the Yankees, including The New York Yankee Encyclopedia and Remembering Yankee Stadium, has outdone himself this time around. The Ultimate Yankee Book combines oral history with stories of legendary figures and epic Yankee feats. Featuring an exhaustive timeline, a challenging 150-question Yankee quiz, entertaining sections on Yankees by the numbers and nicknames and profiles of dozens of Yankee legends and luminaries, this is a book to treasure and turn to again and again. Yankee fans have bragging rights to call their team the greatest of all time. Not only have the Yankees won the most World Series championships and placed the most players in the Hall of Fame, but the franchise is also the most widely featured team in news, social media and books. This groundbreaking work gives fans what they love: the best stories and a mother lode of data right through 2016. More than 125 archival photos and images are a special feature of The Ultimate Yankee Book.

Joseph Brown and His Civil War Ironclads

Author : Myron J. Smith, Jr.
File Size : 64.26 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 765
Read : 864
Download »
 A Scottish immigrant to Illinois, Joseph Brown made his pre–Civil War fortune as a miller and steamboat captain who dabbled in riverboat design and the politics of small towns. When war erupted, he used his connections (including a friendship with Abraham Lincoln) to obtain contracts to build three ironclad gunboats for the U.S. War Department—the Chillicothe, Indianola and Tuscumbia. Often described as failures, these vessels were active in some of the most fer"documents the life and career of Joseph Brown, a miller and steamboat captain who built three ironclad gunboats for the US War Department"ocious river fighting of the 1863 Vicksburg campaign. After the war, “Captain Joe” became a railroad executive and was elected mayor of St. Louis. This book covers his life and career, as well as the construction and operational histories of his controversial trio of warships.

Engineering Victory

Author : Thomas F. Army, Jr.
File Size : 49.94 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 774
Read : 709
Download »
He reveals massive logistical operations as critical in determining the war’s outcome.

The Road to Valley Forge

Author : John Buchanan
File Size : 38.61 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 412
Read : 205
Download »
George Washington's hard lessons are chronicled here, from the British invasion of New York to a series of subsequent defeats wherein the general and his inexperienced soldiers learned how to fight the enemy successfully.