Search results for: thinking-functionally-with-haskell

Thinking Functionally with Haskell

Author : Richard Bird
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Introduces fundamental techniques for reasoning mathematically about functional programs. Ideal for a first- or second-year undergraduate course.

Thinking Functionally with Haskell

Author : Richard Bird
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Richard Bird is famed for the clarity and rigour of his writing. His new textbook, which introduces functional programming to students, emphasises fundamental techniques for reasoning mathematically about functional programs. By studying the underlying equational laws, the book enables students to apply calculational reasoning to their programs, both to understand their properties and to make them more efficient. The book has been designed to fit a first- or second-year undergraduate course and is a thorough overhaul and replacement of his earlier textbooks. It features case studies in Sudoku and pretty-printing, and over 100 carefully selected exercises with solutions. This engaging text will be welcomed by students and teachers alike.

Algorithm Design with Haskell

Author : Richard Bird
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Ideal for learning or reference, this book explains the five main principles of algorithm design and their implementation in Haskell.

Recent Advances in Information Systems and Technologies

Author : Álvaro Rocha
File Size : 60.24 MB
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This book presents a selection of papers from the 2017 World Conference on Information Systems and Technologies (WorldCIST'17), held between the 11st and 13th of April 2017 at Porto Santo Island, Madeira, Portugal. WorldCIST is a global forum for researchers and practitioners to present and discuss recent results and innovations, current trends, professional experiences and challenges involved in modern Information Systems and Technologies research, together with technological developments and applications. The main topics covered are: Information and Knowledge Management; Organizational Models and Information Systems; Software and Systems Modeling; Software Systems, Architectures, Applications and Tools; Multimedia Systems and Applications; Computer Networks, Mobility and Pervasive Systems; Intelligent and Decision Support Systems; Big Data Analytics and Applications; Human–Computer Interaction; Ethics, Computers & Security; Health Informatics; Information Technologies in Education; and Information Technologies in Radiocommunications.

Get Programming with Haskell

Author : Will Kurt
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Summary Get Programming with Haskell introduces you to the Haskell language without drowning you in academic jargon and heavy functional programming theory. By working through 43 easy-to-follow lessons, you''ll learn Haskell the best possible way--by doing Haskell! Purchase of the print book includes a free eBook in PDF, Kindle, and ePub formats from Manning Publications. About the Technology Programming languages often differ only around the edges--a few keywords, libraries, or platform choices. Haskell gives you an entirely new point of view. To the software pioneer Alan Kay, a change in perspective can be worth 80 IQ points and Haskellers agree on the dramatic bene ts of thinking the Haskell way--thinking functionally, with type safety, mathematical certainty, and more. In this hands-on book, that''s exactly what you''ll learn to do. About the Book Get Programming with Haskell leads you through short lessons, examples, and exercises designed to make Haskell your own. It has crystal-clear illustrations and guided practice. You will write and test dozens of interesting programs and dive into custom Haskell modules. You will gain a new perspective on programming plus the practical ability to use Haskell in the everyday world. (The 80 IQ points: not guaranteed.) What''s Inside Thinking in Haskell Functional programming basics Programming in types Real-world applications for Haskell About the Reader Written for readers who know one or more programming languages. About The Author Will Kurt currently works as a data scientist. He writes a blog at www.countbayesie.com, explaining data science to normal people. Table of Contents Lesson 1 Getting started with Haskell Unit 1 - FOUNDATIONS OF FUNCTIONAL PROGRAMMING Lesson 2 Functions and functional programming Lesson 3 Lambda functions and lexical scope Lesson 4 First-class functions Lesson 5 Closures and partial application Lesson 6 Lists Lesson 7 Rules for recursion and pattern matching Lesson 8 Writing recursive functions Lesson 9 Higher-order functions Lesson 10 Capstone: Functional object-oriented programming with robots! Unit 2 - INTRODUCING TYPES Lesson 11 Type basics Lesson 12 Creating your own types Lesson 13 Type classes Lesson 14 Using type classes Lesson 15 Capstone: Secret messages! Unit 3 - PROGRAMMING IN TYPES Lesson 16 Creating types with "and" and "or" Lesson 17 Design by composition--Semigroups and Monoids Lesson 18 Parameterized types Lesson 19 The Maybe type: dealing with missing values Lesson 20 Capstone: Time series Unit 4 - IO IN HASKELL Lesson 21 Hello World!--introducing IO types Lesson 22 Interacting with the command line and lazy I/O Lesson 23 Working with text and Unicode Lesson 24 Working with files Lesson 25 Working with binary data Lesson 26 Capstone: Processing binary files and book data Unit 5 - WORKING WITH TYPE IN A CONTEXT Lesson 27 The Functor type class Lesson 28 A peek at the Applicative type class: using functions in a context Lesson 29 Lists as context: a deeper look at the Applicative type class Lesson 30 Introducing the Monad type class Lesson 31 Making Monads easier with donotation Lesson 32 The list monad and list comprehensions Lesson 33 Capstone: SQL-like queries in Haskell Unit 6 - ORGANIZING CODE AND BUILDING PROJECTS Lesson 34 Organizing Haskell code with modules Lesson 35 Building projects with stack Lesson 36 Property testing with QuickCheck Lesson 37 Capstone: Building a prime-number library Unit 7 - PRACTICAL HASKELL Lesson 38 Errors in Haskell and the Either type Lesson 39 Making HTTP requests in Haskell Lesson 40 Working with JSON data by using Aeson Lesson 41 Using databases in Haskell Lesson 42 Efficient, stateful arrays in Haskell Afterword - What''s next? Appendix - Sample answers to exercises

Functional Programming A PragPub Anthology

Author : Michael Swaine
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Explore functional programming and discover new ways of thinking about code. You know you need to master functional programming, but learning one functional language is only the start. In this book, through articles drawn from PragPub magazine and articles written specifically for this book, you'll explore functional thinking and functional style and idioms across languages. Led by expert guides, you'll discover the distinct strengths and approaches of Clojure, Elixir, Haskell, Scala, and Swift and learn which best suits your needs. Contributing authors: Rich Hickey, Stuart Halloway, Aaron Bedra, Michael Bevilacqua-Linn, Venkat Subramaniam, Paul Callaghan, Jose Valim, Dave Thomas, Natasha Murashev, Tony Hillerson, Josh Chisholm, and Bruce Tate. Functional programming is on the rise because it lets you write simpler, cleaner code, and its emphasis on immutability makes it ideal for maximizing the benefits of multiple cores and distributed solutions. So far nobody's invented the perfect functional language - each has its unique strengths. In Functional Programming: A PragPub Anthology, you'll investigate the philosophies, tools, and idioms of five different functional programming languages. See how Swift, the development language for iOS, encourages you to build highly scalable apps using functional techniques like map and reduce. Discover how Scala allows you to transition gently but deeply into functional programming without losing the benefits of the JVM, while with Lisp-based Clojure, you can plunge fully into the functional style. Learn about advanced functional concepts in Haskell, a pure functional language making powerful use of the type system with type inference and type classes. And see how functional programming is becoming more elegant and friendly with Elixir, a new functional language built on the powerful Erlang base.The industry has been embracing functional programming more and more, driven by the need for concurrency and parallelism. This collection of articles will lead you to mastering the functional approach to problem solving. So put on your explorer's hat and prepare to be surprised. The goal of exploration is always discovery. What You Need: Familiarity with one or more programming languages.

The Haskell School of Expression

Author : Paul Hudak
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Functional programming is a style of programming that emphasizes the use of functions (in contrast to object-oriented programming, which emphasizes the use of objects). It has become popular in recent years because of its simplicity, conciseness, and clarity. This book teaches functional programming as a way of thinking and problem solving, using Haskell, the most popular purely functional language. Rather than using the conventional (boring) mathematical examples commonly found in other programming language textbooks, the author uses examples drawn from multimedia applications, including graphics, animation, and computer music, thus rewarding the reader with working programs for inherently more interesting applications. Aimed at both beginning and advanced programmers, this tutorial begins with a gentle introduction to functional programming and moves rapidly on to more advanced topics. Details about progamming in Haskell are presented in boxes throughout the text so they can be easily found and referred to.

Haskell

Author : Mem Lnc
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A balance of flexible and inflexible qualities make Haskell a fascinating programming language to learn and use.First, the Haskell programming language is not named after Eddie Haskell, the sneaky double-dealing neighbor kid in the ancient TV sitcom, Leave It To Beaver.Haskell is named after Haskell Brooks Curry, an American mathematician and logician. If you don't know, logicians create models to describe and define human reasoning, for example, problems in mathematics, computer science, and philosophy. Haskell's main work was in combinatory logic, a notation designed to eliminate the need for variables in mathematical logic. Combinatory logic captures many key features of computation and, as a result, is useful in computer science. Haskell has three programming languages named after him: Haskell, Brooks, and Curry.Haskell the language is built around functions, useful blocks of code that do specific tasks. They are called and used only when needed.Another interesting feature of functional languages like Haskell: functions are treated as values like integers (numbers) and strings. You can add a function to another function the way you can add an integer to an integer, 1 + 1 or 35 + 53. Perhaps the best way to describe this quality is a spreadsheet: in a cell in the spreadsheet, you can add numbers as well as a combination of functions to work on numbers. For example, you might specify each number in cells 1-10 be added up as a sum. In Excel, at least, you also can use SUMIF to look for a pattern in cells 1-10 and, if the pattern is found, perform an action on any cells with the pattern.What Makes Haskell Special?Technically, Haskell is a general-purpose functional programming language with non-strict semantics and strong static typing. The primary control construct is the function. (Say that fast ten times!) Here's what it means: - Every language has a strategy to evaluate when to process the input arguments used in a call to a function. The simplest strategy is to evaluate the input arguments passed then run the function with the arguments. Non-strict semantics means the input arguments are not evaluated unless the arguments passed into the function are used to evaluate what is in the body of the function.- Programming languages have rules to assign properties - called a type - to the components of the language: variables, functions, expressions, and modules. A type is a general description of possible values the variable, function, expression, or module can store. Typing helps minimize bugs, for example, when a calculation uses a string ("house" or "cat") instead of a number (2 or 3). Strong static typing evaluates the code before runtime, when the code is static and possibly as code is written.- The order in which statements, instructions and functions are evaluated and executed determines the results of any piece of code. Control constructs define the order of evaluation. Constructs use an initial keyword to flag the type of control structure used. Initial keywords might be "if" or "do" or "loop" while final keywords might be "end if" or "enddo" or "end loop". Instead of a final keyword, Haskell uses indentation level (tabs) or curly brackets, or a mix, to indicate the end of a control structure.Perhaps what makes Haskell special is how coders have to think when they use the language. Functional programming languages work in very different ways than imperative languages where the coder manages many low-level details of what happens in their code and when. While it is true all languages have things in common, it's also true languages are mostly functional or mostly imperative, the way people are mostly right handed or left handed. Except functional programming languages require a different way of thinking about software as you code.

Haskell Programming

Author : Emma William
File Size : 38.11 MB
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A balance of flexible and inflexible qualities make Haskell a fascinating programming language to learn and use. First, the Haskell programming language is not named after Eddie Haskell, the sneaky double-dealing neighbor kid in the ancient TV sitcom, Leave It To Beaver. Haskell is named after Haskell Brooks Curry, an American mathematician and logician. If you don't know, logicians create models to describe and define human reasoning, for example, problems in mathematics, computer science, and philosophy. Haskell's main work was in combinatory logic, a notation designed to eliminate the need for variables in mathematical logic. Combinatory logic captures many key features of computation and, as a result, is useful in computer science. Haskell has three programming languages named after him: Haskell, Brooks, and Curry. Haskell the language is built around functions, useful blocks of code that do specific tasks. They are called and used only when needed. Another interesting feature of functional languages like Haskell: functions are treated as values like integers (numbers) and strings. You can add a function to another function the way you can add an integer to an integer, 1 + 1 or 35 + 53. Perhaps the best way to describe this quality is a spreadsheet: in a cell in the spreadsheet, you can add numbers as well as a combination of functions to work on numbers. For example, you might specify each number in cells 1-10 be added up as a sum. In Excel, at least, you also can use SUMIF to look for a pattern in cells 1-10 and, if the pattern is found, perform an action on any cells with the pattern. What Makes Haskell Special? Technically, Haskell is a general-purpose functional programming language with non-strict semantics and strong static typing. The primary control construct is the function. (Say that fast ten times!) Here's what it means: - Every language has a strategy to evaluate when to process the input arguments used in a call to a function. The simplest strategy is to evaluate the input arguments passed then run the function with the arguments. Non-strict semantics means the input arguments are not evaluated unless the arguments passed into the function are used to evaluate what is in the body of the function. - Programming languages have rules to assign properties -- called a type -- to the components of the language: variables, functions, expressions, and modules. A type is a general description of possible values the variable, function, expression, or module can store. Typing helps minimize bugs, for example, when a calculation uses a string ("house" or "cat") instead of a number (2 or 3). Strong static typing evaluates the code before runtime, when the code is static and possibly as code is written. - The order in which statements, instructions and functions are evaluated and executed determines the results of any piece of code. Control constructs define the order of evaluation. Constructs use an initial keyword to flag the type of control structure used. Initial keywords might be "if" or "do" or "loop" while final keywords might be "end if" or "enddo" or "end loop". Instead of a final keyword, Haskell uses indentation level (tabs) or curly brackets, or a mix, to indicate the end of a control structure. Perhaps what makes Haskell special is how coders have to think when they use the language. Functional programming languages work in very different ways than imperative languages where the coder manages many low-level details of what happens in their code and when. While it is true all languages have things in common, it's also true languages are mostly functional or mostly imperative, the way people are mostly right handed or left handed. Except functional programming languages require a different way of thinking about software as you code

Dr Dobb s Journal

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