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The Violent American Century

Author : John Dower
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World War II marked the apogee of industrialized "total war.” Great powers savaged one another. Hostilities engulfed the globe. Mobilization extended to virtually every sector of every nation. Air war, including the terror bombing of civilians, emerged as a central strategy of the victorious Anglo-American powers. The devastation was catastrophic almost everywhere, with the notable exception of the United States, which exited the strife unscathed and unmatched in power and influence. The death toll of fighting forces plus civilians worldwide was staggering. The Violent "American Century” addresses the U.S.-led transformations in war conduct and strategizing that followed 1945--beginning with brutal localized hostilities, proxy wars, and the nuclear terror of the Cold War, and ending with the asymmetrical conflicts of the present day. The military playbook now meshes brute force with a focus on non-state terrorism, counterinsurgency, clandestine operations, a vast web of overseas American military bases, and--most touted of all--a revolutionary new era of computerized "precision” warfare. By contrast to World War II, postwar death and destruction has been comparatively small. By any other measure, it has been appalling--and shows no sign of abating. The winner of numerous national prizes for his historical writings, including the Pulitzer and the National Book Award, Dower draws heavily on hard data and internal U.S. planning and pronouncements in this concise analysis of war and terror in our time. In doing so, he places U.S. policy and practice firmly within the broader context of global mayhem, havoc, and slaughter since World War II--always with bottom-line attentiveness to the human costs of this legacy of unceasing violence.

The Violent American Century

Author : John W. Dower
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“Tells how America, since the end of World War II, has turned away from its ideals and goodness to become a match setting the world on fire” (Seymour Hersh, investigative journalist and national security correspondent). World War II marked the apogee of industrialized “total war.” Great powers savaged one another. Hostilities engulfed the globe. Mobilization extended to virtually every sector of every nation. Air war, including the terror bombing of civilians, emerged as a central strategy of the victorious Anglo-American powers. The devastation was catastrophic almost everywhere, with the notable exception of the United States, which exited the strife unmatched in power and influence. The death toll of fighting forces plus civilians worldwide was staggering. The Violent American Century addresses the US-led transformations in war conduct and strategizing that followed 1945—beginning with brutal localized hostilities, proxy wars, and the nuclear terror of the Cold War, and ending with the asymmetrical conflicts of the present day. The military playbook now meshes brute force with a focus on non-state terrorism, counterinsurgency, clandestine operations, a vast web of overseas American military bases, and—most touted of all—a revolutionary new era of computerized “precision” warfare. In contrast to World War II, postwar death and destruction has been comparatively small. By any other measure, it has been appalling—and shows no sign of abating. The author, recipient of a Pulitzer Prize and a National Book Award, draws heavily on hard data and internal US planning and pronouncements in this concise analysis of war and terror in our time. In doing so, he places US policy and practice firmly within the broader context of global mayhem, havoc, and slaughter since World War II—always with bottom-line attentiveness to the human costs of this legacy of unceasing violence. “Dower delivers a convincing blow to publisher Henry Luce’s benign ‘American Century’ thesis.” —Publishers Weekly

The End of the American Century

Author : David S. Mason
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This compelling and persuasive book is the first to explore all of the interrelated aspects of America's decline. Hard-hitting and provocative, yet measured and clearly written, The End of the American Century demonstrates the phases of social, economic, and international decline that mark the end of a period of world dominance that began with World War II. The costs of the war on terror and the Iraq War have exacerbated the already daunting problems of debt, poverty, inequality, and political and social decay. David S. Mason convincingly argues that the United States, like other great powers in the past, is experiencing the dilemma of "imperial overstretch"—bankrupting the home front in pursuit of costly and fruitless foreign ventures. The author shows that elsewhere in the world, the United States is no longer admired as a model for democracy and economic development; indeed, it is often feared or resented. He compares the United States and its accomplishments with other industrialized democracies and potential rivals. The European Union is more stable in economic and social terms, and countries like India and China are more economically dynamic. These and other nations will soon eclipse the United States, signaling a fundamental transformation of the global scene. This transition will require huge adjustments for American citizens and political leaders alike. But in the end, Americans—and the world—will be better off with a less profligate, more interdependent United States. More information is available on the author's website.

The Rise and Decline of the American Century

Author : William O. Walker III
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In 1941 the magazine publishing titan Henry R. Luce urged the nation’s leaders to create an American Century. But in the post-World-War-II era proponents of the American Century faced a daunting task. Even so, Luce had articulated an animating idea that, as William O. Walker III skillfully shows in The Rise and Decline of the American Century, would guide United States foreign policy through the years of hot and cold war. The American Century was, Walker argues, the counter-balance to defensive war during World War II and the containment of communism during the Cold War. American policymakers pursued an aggressive agenda to extend U.S. influence around the globe through control of economic markets, reliance on nation-building, and, where necessary, provision of arms to allied forces. This positive program for the expansion of American power, Walker deftly demonstrates, came in for widespread criticism by the late 1950s. A changing world, epitomized by the nonaligned movement, challenged U.S. leadership and denigrated the market democracy at the heart of the ideal of the American Century. Walker analyzes the international crises and monetary troubles that further curtailed the reach of the American Century in the early 1960s and brought it to a halt by the end of that decade. By 1968, it seemed that all the United States had to offer to allies and non-hostile nations was convenient military might, nuclear deterrence, and the uncertainty of détente. Once the dust had fallen on Lyndon B. Johnson’s presidency and Richard M. Nixon had taken office, what remained was, The Rise and Decline of the American Century shows, an adulterated, strategically-based version of Luce’s American Century.

American Century

Author : Ralph K. Andrist
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Oil and the American Century

Author : David S. Painter
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Poverty in Common

Author : Alyosha Goldstein
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In post-World War II America, the idea that local community action was indispensable for the alleviation of poverty was broadly embraced by policymakers, social scientists, international development specialists, and grassroots activists. Governmental efforts to mobilize community action in the name of democracy served as a volatile condition of possibility through which poor people and dispossessed groups negotiated the tension between calls for self-help and demands for self-determination in the context of the Cold War and global decolonization. Poverty in Common suggests new ways to think about the relationship between liberalism, government, and inequality with implications for popular debates over the "end of welfare" and neo-liberalism in the United States. Drawing on oral histories, program records, community newspapers, policy documents, and records of public hearings, Alyosha Goldstein analyzes a compelling but often overlooked series of historical episodes: Progressive era reform as a precursor to community development during the Cold War; how the language of "underdevelopment" articulated ideas about poverty and foreignness; the use of poverty as a crucible of interest group politics; and how radical groups critically reframed the question of community action in anti-colonial terms. He shows how approaches to poverty were linked to the racialised and gendered negotiation of boundaries--between foreign and domestic, empire and nation, violence and order, dependency and autonomy--in the mid-twentieth-century United States.

Modernizing Repression

Author : Jeremy Kuzmarov
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A probing analysis of the impact of American policing operations abroad

American Thought and Culture in the 21st Century

Author : Martin Halliwell
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This volume considers the changing patterns of American thought and culture in its transition into the early 21st century.

The Violent Century

Author : Lavie Tidhar
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Praise for The Violent Century “The Violent Century is a very sophisticated blend of fantasy and real life. Of flawed superheroes engaging with key events in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Lavie Tidhar is a veteran of seamlessly weaving an intriguing blend of fiction into world changing historical events.” —Strange Alliances “The Violent Centuryis a wonderfully constructed, crafted work that bears a great emotional weight even as it raises more intellectual questions. It’s the kind of work that lingers in the mind long after the reading.” —Fantasy Literature “Heart, a sly sense of humour, great action set-pieces and a range of fascinating supporting players.” —Newtown Review of Books “A brilliantly etched phantasmagoric reconfiguring of that most sizzling of eras—the twilight 20th . . . a torrid tour de force.” —James Ellroy, author of L.A. Confidential and Blood’s a Rover “A brilliant novel of ideas.” — B&N Book Blog “The Violent Century is admirably plotted and well paced, with an atmosphere of menace throughout, I’m puzzled as to why this wasn’t on any award shortlist for its year.” —Jack Deighton, author of A Son of the Rock “Like Watchmen on crack.” —io9 “If Nietzche had written an X-Men storyline whilst high on mescaline, it might have read something like The Violent Century.” —Adam Roberts, author of Jack Glass “Pack your bags and go home; the superhero genre is now completed . . . if John le Carre wrote a superhero novel about the Cold War, it might be this good.” —Charles Stross, author of Neptune’s Brood: A Space Opera “The Violent Century is a brilliant story of superheroes and spies and secret histories. It stands with Alan Moore’s Watchmen as an examination of the myths that we made in the 20th Century and the ways they still haunt us now. it’s as dramatic and vital as the best comic books and as beautifully written and evocative as any literary novel today. Read it. You’ll see.” — Christopher Farnsworth, author of Blood Oath and Flashmob “An alternative history tour-de-force. Epic, intense and authentic. Lavie Tidhar reboots the 20th century with spies and superheroes battling for mastery—and the results are electric.” —Tom Harper, author of The Lost Temple “A stunning masterpiece” —The Independent “Tidhar synthesises the geeky and the political in a vision of world events that breaks new superhero ground.” —The Guardian “It’s hard, but not impossible as Alan Moore, Neil Gaiman, Mike Carey and others have shown, to create a morally complex, artistically ambitious story based on characters whose origins are not that far removed from the simplicity of Superman, Spiderman, and their ilk. Tidhar has succeeded brilliantly in this task.” —LA Review of Books “A sophisticated, moving and gripping take on 20th century conflicts and our capacity for love and hate, honour and betrayal.” —The Daily Mail “A love story and meditation on heroism, this is an elegiac espionage adventure that demands a second reading.” —Metro “Could keep anyone, regardless of the types of stories they regularly enjoy, interested and engaged. Tidhar has created a book that oozes excellence in both characterisation and storytelling.” —The Huffington Post [STARRED REVIEW]"This study in heroism, love, revenge, and violence will be in demand by lovers of complex, intelligent sf and alternative history. Anyone who enjoys stories of people with supernatural abilities will thrive reading Tidhar’s world.” —Library Journal “A terrifically told tale of heroism and enduring friendship that captures our imaginations from the very first page.” —Booklist “If you love Philip K. Dick, Lavie Tidhar should be your new favorite writer . . . an unforgettable read.” —The Jewish Standard “He’s dealing with the grandest schemes on the largest of backdrops in time and place, and this level of awe-inspiring craft places him firmly within the highest tier of writers working today, no longer an emerging writer, but a master.” —British Fantasy Society “Intense and evocative.” —SFX “Gripping, imaginative and moving.” —Sci Fi Now “The sort of thing Quentin Tarantino did as bloody wish-fulfillment in Inglourious Basterds, multiplied by several orders of magnitude.” —Locus “This is a novel that can break your heart and then, ever so subtly, include a cameo by Stan Lee. Tidhar clearly knows as much about supermen of all kinds as he does about the circumstances that produce them.” —Strange Horizons “The Violent Century is an excellent novel that demonstrates, once again, the impressive versatility of its author.” —Interzone “A masterful example of alternate universe science fiction and can only add to its author’s rapidly growing reputation.”— The Los Angeles Review of Books “An original, engrossing fusion of noir-ish super-heroes and gritty espionage thriller . . . a fantastic novel” —Civilian Reader “Lavie Tidhar is no longer a rising star in the genre, but one burning bright.” —Staffer’s Book Review Praise for the Campbell Award and Neukom Literary-winning novel Central Station An NPR Best Book of 2016 An Amazon Featured Best Science Fiction & Fantasy Book A Tor.com Best Book of 2016 A Guardian Best SF & Fantasy Book of 2016 A Publishers Weekly Staff Pick A Kirkus Best Science Fiction and Fantasy pick British Science Fiction Award, shortlist Arthur C. Clarke Award, shortlist “It is just this side of a masterpiece — short, restrained, lush — and the truest joy of it is in the way Tidhar scatters brilliant ideas like pennies on the sidewalk.” —NPR Books [STARRED REVIEW] "Readers of all persuasions will be entranced.” —Publishers Weekly [STARRED REVIEW] “. . . a fascinating future glimpsed through the lens of a tight-knit community. Verdict: Tidhar (A Man Lies Dreaming; The Violent Century) changes genres with every outing, but his astounding talents guarantee something new and compelling no matter the story he tells.” —Library Journal, starred review "A sprawling hymn to the glory and mess of cultural diversity.” —Guardian ”Quietly enthralling and subtly ingenious.” —Asimov's Science Fiction “Beautiful, original, a shimmering tapestry of connections and images - I can't think of another SF novel quite like it. Lavie Tidhar is one of the most distinctive voices to enter the field in many years.” —Alastair Reynolds, author of the Revelation Space series “If you want to know what SF is going to look like in the next decade, this is it.” —Gardner Dozois, editor of the bestselling Year’s Best Science Fiction series “A dazzling tale of complicated politics and even more complicated souls. Beautiful.” —Ken Liu, author of The Paper Menagerie “Central Station is masterful: simultaneously spare and sweeping—a perfect combination of emotional sophistication and speculative vision. Tidhar always stuns me.” —Kij Johnson, author of At the Mouth of the River of Bees “ A unique marriage of Philip K. Dick, William Gibson, C. L. Moore, China Miéville, and Larry Niven with 50 degrees of compassion and the bizarre added. An irresistible cocktail.” —Maxim Jakubowski, author of the Sunday Times bestselling Vina Jackson novels Praise for Unholy Land “Lavie Tidhar does it again. A jewelled little box of miracles. Magnificent.” —Warren Ellis, author of Gun Machine “[STARRED REVIEW] Readers of all kinds, and particularly fans of detective stories and puzzles, will enjoy grappling with the numerous questions raised by this stellar work.” —Publishers Weekly “It’s precisely what we’ve come to expect of Tidhar, a writer who just keeps getting better.” —Angela Slatter, author of the World Fantasy Award-winning The Bitterwood Bible “There are SFF writers. There are good SFF writers. And there is Lavie Tidhar . . . Bold and witty and smoky, [Unholy Land] plays games and coquetries, makes dark dalliances and will leave you dazzled and delighted.” —Ian McDonald, author of Time Was and Luna: Wolf Moon "A genius, dreamlike fantasy for those who slip across might-have-been worlds.” —Saad Z. Hossain, author of Escape from Baghdad! “Unholy Land is a stunning achievement.” —The Speculative Shelf “Lavie Tidhar has given us a mystically charged, morally complex vision of Theodor Herzl’s famous Jewish state that might have been.” —James Morrow, author of The Last Witchfinder and Shambling Towards Hiroshima “Lavie Tidhar’s daring Unholy Land brilliantly showcases one of the foremost science fiction authors of our generation.” — Silvia Moreno-Garcia, World Fantasy Award-winning editor and author of Certain Dark Things “Unholy Land is probably better than Michael Chabon’s Yiddish Policeman’s Union.” —Bradley Horner, author of the Darkside Earther series

America

Author : Andrew Robert Lee Cayton
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Tender Violence

Author : Laura Wexler
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Examines the work of such female photojournalists as Alice Austen, Jessie Tarbox Beals, and Frances Benjamin Johnston, arguing that they produced images that helped to reinforce the imperialistic ideals that were forming at the beginning of the 20th century.

Di logo an Interdisciplinary Studies Journal

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The Economist

Author :
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Earth Day

Author : Jean Griffith
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Issues. They are the conflagrations, the bonfires, the burning controversies so profound, so personal they move people to take action and generate the momentum to change the political system and the course of history. Be it the Boston Tea Party of 1773, Jacob Coxey’s Army, the Bonus Army March of June 1932, the National Moratorium to End the War in Vietnam, the Women’s March of January 2018, or March for Our Lives to end gun violence in America in March of 2018, all came about because of Americans motivated by issues so much so they took their message of change to the street. Driven by issues which galvanized public opinion, people protested, demonstrating public solidarity for a cause. Earth Day: America at the Environmental Crossroads is a political history focusing on the issues which generated the first Earth Day in April 1970. It is about the people who brought about this momentous political turning point during a period in American history of unprecedented turmoil and political protest. Open its cover, and you will learn about the agents of change. Some have risen to take their place in the pantheon of environmental history; others are all but forgotten in the collective public mind. It begins with herbicide contamination and the Cranberry Scare of November 1959 then explains the use of Agent Orange in Vietnam and its impact on the environmental movement. Though the use of two nuclear weapons by the United States military ended World War II in the Pacific, the inevitable arms race with the Soviet Union during the Cold War led to the testing of these weapons of mass destruction. The second chapter explains how nuclear contaminated fallout became a health threat and a concern for environmentalists and the general public. Overpopulation seems to be a nonissue today. During the decades prior to Earth Day in 1970, the world’s population numbers were a concern of monumental importance. This is the focus of chapter three. No credible treatment of the twentieth century environmental movement would be complete without addressing the contribution of Rachel Carson and her book Silent Spring. Unlike pesticides, the effects of which oftentimes surface years after exposure, deteriorating air quality burned the eyes and made it difficult to breathe. Polluted air particularly in the country’s urban areas not only left an indelible impression in the minds of environmentalists, but it also threatened public health. And clean water, taken for granted today by most Americans, is the subject of chapter six, which describes the extent to which the country’s waterways were part of a multibillion-dollar restoration project on the part of the states mandated by the federal government. The seventh chapter is a retelling of the oil spill disaster in Santa Barbara, California, and the radical fringe of the environmental movement which manifested itself before Earth Day, a fitting precursor to the event itself the subject of the final chapter.

The Message

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America History and Life

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Article abstracts and citations of reviews and dissertations covering the United States and Canada.

Radical Philosophy

Author :
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Choice

Author :
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The Declassified Eisenhower

Author : Blanche Wiesen Cook
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Reevaluates the presidency of Dwight Eisenhower, with an emphasis on his role as a man of peace, discussing his attempts to establish a foreign policy designed to permanently secure international peace