Search results for: the-medieval-horse-and-its-equipment-c1150-1450

The Medieval Horse and Its Equipment C 1150 c 1450

Author : John Clark
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Over 400 recent finds associated with horses and excavated in London, from the utilitarian to the highly decorated, illustrated and discussed.

The Medieval Horse and Its Equipment C 1150 c 1450

Author : Museum of London
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Horses played a vital role in medieval life. This catalogue describes and illustrates over 400 medieval finds, associated with horses, excavated in London in recent years. It includes harness, horseshoes, spurs and curry combs, and ranges from everyday artefacts to highly wrought decorative pieces. An introductory chapter surveys the role of the horse and horse husbandry in medieval London, discussing the use of pack-horses and carts in and around London, and the function of the marshal or farrier. The book also deals with the size and power of the medieval horse, including the size of a knight's Great Horse, and why it took three horses to haul a medieval cart.

The Medieval Horse and Its Equipment C 1150 c 1450

Author : Museum of London
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Horses played a vital role in medieval life. This catalogue describes and illustrates over 400 medieval finds, associated with horses, excavated in London in recent years. It includes harness, horseshoes, spurs and curry combs, and ranges from everyday artefacts to highly wrought decorative pieces. An introductory chapter surveys the role of the horse and horse husbandry in medieval London, discussing the use of pack-horses and carts in and around London, and the function of the marshal or farrier. The book also deals with the size and power of the medieval horse, including the size of a knight's Great Horse, and why it took three horses to haul a medieval cart.

Handbook of Medieval Culture

Author : Albrecht Classen
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A follow-up publication to the Handbook of Medieval Studies, this new reference work turns to a different focus: medieval culture. Medieval research has grown tremendously in depth and breadth over the last decades. Particularly our understanding of medieval culture, of the basic living conditions, and the specific value system prevalent at that time has considerably expanded, to a point where we are in danger of no longer seeing the proverbial forest for the trees. The present, innovative handbook offers compact articles on essential topics, ideals, specific knowledge, and concepts defining the medieval world as comprehensively as possible. The topics covered in this new handbook pertain to issues such as love and marriage, belief in God, hell, and the devil, education, lordship and servitude, Christianity versus Judaism and Islam, health, medicine, the rural world, the rise of the urban class, travel, roads and bridges, entertainment, games, and sport activities, numbers, measuring, the education system, the papacy, saints, the senses, death, and money.

Introducing the Medieval Ass

Author : Kathryn L. Smithies
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Introducing the Medieval Ass presents a lucid, accessible, and comprehensive picture of the ass’s enormous socio-economic and cultural significance in the Middle Ages and beyond. In the Middle Ages, the ass became synonymous with human idiocy, a comic figure representing foolish peasants, students too dull to learn, and their asinine teachers. This trope of foolishness was so prevalent that by the eighteenth century the word ‘ass’ had been replaced by ‘donkey’. Economically, the medieval ass was a vital, utilitarian beast of burden, rather like today’s ubiquitous white van; culturally, however, the medieval ass enjoyed a rich, paradoxical reputation. Its hard work was praised, but its obstinacy condemned. It exemplified the good Christian, humbly bearing Christ to Jerusalem, but also represented Sloth, a mortal sin. Its potent sexual reputation – one literary ass had sex with a woman – was simultaneously linked to sterility and, to this day, ‘ass’ and ‘arse’ remain culturally-connected homophones.

Excavations at Dryslwyn Castle 1980 1995

Author : Chris Caple
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"Excavations at Dryslwyn between 1980 and 1995 uncovered a masonry castle, founded in the late 1220s by Rhys Gryg for his son Maredudd ap Rhys, the first Lord of Dryslwyn. The first castle was a simple round tower and polygonal walled enclosure, within which were constructed a kitchen, prison and wood-framed, clay-floored great chamber beside a great hall. In the mid 13th century a second ward was added and the great chamber rebuilt in stone. This castle was greatly expanded in the period 1283-87 by Rhys ap Maredudd, the second and final Lord of Dryslwyn, who built an Outer Ward and gatehouse. He also rebuilt much of the Inner Ward, adding an extra storey to the great hall and great chamber, apartments and a chapel. At the end of the 13th century a large three-ward castle stretched along the eastern and southern edge of the hill while the rest of the hilltop was occupied by a settlement defended by a wall and substantial ditch with access through a gatehouse. This castle and its associated settlement were besieged and captured in 1287 by an English royal army of over 11,000 men following damage inflicted by a trebuchet and mining of the walls. Throughout the 14th century the English Crown garrisoned and repaired the castle, supervised by an appointed constable, before it was surrendered to Owain Glyn Dwr in 1403. During the early to mid 15th century the castle was deliberately walled up to deny its use to a potential enemy and it was subsequently looted and demolished. By the late 13th century, the castle had a white rendered and lime-washed appearance, creating a very dramatic and highly visible symbol of lordship. Internally, the lord's and guest apartments had decorative wall paintings and glazed windows. Evidence from charred beams still in situ, the sizes, shapes and distribution of nails, sheet lead, slates and postholes recovered during excavation has enabled some of the wooden as well as masonry buildings to be reconstructed. Waterlogged deposits had preserved a rich assemblage of seeds, birds, fish and animal bone which reveal evidence of the dining habits of Welsh lords, their guests and household. Of particular interest are the finds associated with the siege of 1287 which include a knop-headed mace, spearheads and armour-piercing arrowheads which indicates that the longbow was the weapon of choice. Damage and repairs to the castle walls correlate with historic accounts while three stone balls recovered by the excavation were undoubtedly thrown by the trebuchet recorded in contemporary accounts."

Wigmore Castle North Herefordshire

Author : Stephanie Ratkai
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"Excavations at Wigmore Castle were carried out in 1996 and 1998 as a precursor to repair and consolidation of the castle by English Heritage. The castle had remained the honorial caput of the Mortimer family from the late 11th century through to 1425, an unusually long tenure amongst Marcher lordships. The Mortimer family became increasingly important players in the history of England. Thereafter the Mortimer inheritance passed to the Dukes of York and from there to the Crown. Evidence of the earliest castle was found during the excavations, including part of a substantial 12th-century timber building, part of which had been used as a kitchen. Here remains of a sequence of hearths, cooking pots and food remains were found. The construction of defences in stone probably began in the 12th century. The effect of conflict on the castle was indicated by the presence of ballista balls, arrowheads, a possible crannequin and fragments of plate armour. A possible period of neglect occurred in the later 14th century but by the 15th century the castle was the scene of renewed activity including the rebuilding of the curtain wall. Dietary evidence and some of the artefacts indicate that there was high-status occupation, in which hunting played an important role that continued throughout the 15th century. By the 16th century the castle fabric was beginning to fall into disrepair and evidence of repairs and modifications were noted. Nevertheless, high-status occupation continued and the castle remained to play an important role as a secondary seat of the Council of the Marches. However, by the early 17th century decline at the castle appears to have been terminal. The castle was now owned by the Harley family and it is they who are credited with the pre-emptive slighting of the castle during the Civil War. The slighting is not evident in the excavated areas, and the area in and around the East Tower appears to have been derelict well before the mid-17th century. Pottery, clay pipe and other artefacts which can definitely be ascribed to the Civil War are few. An oxshoe found in the latest deposits may well be associated with the removal of fallen stone for building elsewhere. Thereafter the castle appears to have been little visited and almost total ruination had set in by the early 18th century. In 1995 the castle was taken into English Heritage Guardianship and has been consolidated and restored as a romantic ruin.

The Horse in Medieval England

Author : Herbert James Hewitt
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Craft Industry and Everyday Life

Author : Quita Mould
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This volume presents the surviving evidence for the manufacture and use of leather artefacts at York during the Anglo-Scandinavian and medieval periods. Based around the internationally important group of Anglo-Scandinavian leatherwork from 16-22 Coppergate, it also includes material recovered from other sites in the city. Over 5,000 items of leather dating from the later 9th century through to the 15th century are represented, some 550 of which are fully catalogued. T he recovery of large quantities of manufacturing debris at Coppergate suggests that leatherworking was undertaken there in both the Anglo-Scandinavian and the medieval periods. Shoe making was at its height in the 10th century; cobbling was also being undertaken at this time and continued throughout the medieval period. There is evidence for the refurbishment of knife sheaths in the Anglo-Scandinavian period, a phenomenon not previously recognised elsewhere. The leather items themselves are described in detail. These include shoes, knife sheaths, sword scabbards, straps, purses, elliptical panels, balls and an archer's wrist guard. Shoes represent the largest category of manufactured leather recovered.A small number of shoes made from a single piece of leather were found in Anglo-Scandinavian deposits, but the vast majority of the shoes from both Anglo-Scandinavian and medieval contexts were of turnshoe construction. A significant corpus of knife and seax sheaths and sword scabbards was recovered. Future researchers will be able to use the York leather assemblage presented here to re-examine current issues and develop new hypotheses, continuing to move forward the study of the leather industry and to elucidate the complexities of post-Roman economy and society.

Medieval Finds from Excavations in London Set

Author : Boydell & Brewer, Incorporated
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Seven volume set of these classic works of reference, essential for students, scholars, archaeologists, re-enactors and historians of material culture, textiles and tools.

Archaeology in the City of London 1907 1991

Author : Catharine Maloney
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A Cultural History of Animals in the Medieval Age

Author : Brigitte Resl
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Choice Outstanding Academic Title, 2008 A Cultural History of Animals in the Medieval Age investigates the changing roles of animals in medieval culture, economy and society in the period 1000 to 1400. The period saw significant changes in scientific and philosophical approaches to animals as well as their representation in art. Animals were omnipresent in medieval everyday life. They had enormous importance for medieval agriculture and trade and were also hunted for food and used in popular entertainments. At the same time, animals were kept as pets and used to display their owner's status, whilst medieval religion attributed complex symbolic meanings to animals. A Cultural History of Animals in the Medieval Age presents an overview of the period and continues with essays on the position of animals in contemporary symbolism, hunting, domestication, sports and entertainment, science, philosophy, and art.

Armies Chivalry and Warfare in Medieval Britain and France

Author : Matthew Strickland
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The proceedings of the 1995 Harlaxton Symposium comprise twenty essays which testify to the diversity of current approaches to the study of medieval warfare, employing not only a variety of chronicle and documentary sources, but also contemporary literature and iconography, from the early middle ages to the sixteen century. Contributors include Maurice Keen, Christopher Allmand, Carol Edgington, Richard Morris, Jim Bradbury, Toby Purser, Charles Coulson, Andrew Ayton, Kay Lacey, Michael Prestwich, Kelly DeVries, Mathew Strickland and Frederique Lachaud.

Tristania

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Somerset Archaeology and Natural History

Author : Somersetshire Archaeological and Natural History Society
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A Cultural History of Animals

Author : Linda Kalof
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A Cultural History of Animals is a multi-volume project on the history of human-animal relations from ancient times to the present. The set of six volumes covers 4500 years of human-animal interaction. Volume 1: Antiquity to the Dark Ages (2500BC - 1000AD) Volume 2: The Medieval Age (1000-1400) Volume 3: The Renaissance (1400-1600) Volume 4: The Enlightenment (1600-1800) Volume 5: The Age of Empire (1800-1920) Volume 6: The Modern Age (1920-2000, including a discussion of animals of the future). Each volume shares the same structure, with chapters analyzing the same issues and themes for each time period. In this way, the volumes can be read individually to cover a specific period and individual chapters can be read across volumes to follow a theme across history. Each volume explores: the sacred and the symbolic (totem, sacrifice, status and popular beliefs), hunting; domestication (taming, breeding, labor and companionship); entertainment and exhibitions (the menagerie, zoos, circuses and carnivals); science and specimens (research, education, collections and museums); philosophical beliefs; and artistic representations. The full six volume set combines to present the most authoritative and comprehensive survey available on animals through history.

Oxoniensia

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Chivalry Knighthood and War in the Middle Ages

Author : Susan Janet Ridyard
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Crusader Warfare

Author : David Nicolle
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Handbook for British and Irish Archaeology

Author : Cherry Lavell
File Size : 76.60 MB
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Where can I find an amateur archaeological society to join? How can I find out more about a particular aspect of archaeology? Which are the most useful available texts in this field? Which Universities run archaeology courses? If you have ever asked or been asked any of the above questions, then this is the book for you - a one-stop, truly comprehensive, dedicated and reliable sourcebook for archaeology. In one volume the Handbook offers an astonishingly wide range of up-to-date information, including: Lists of organisations, national societies and special interest groups within archaeology and contributory disciplines A catalogue of finding aids such as printed bibliographies, dictionaries, map lists and record office directories A guide to grant sources Lists of archaeological touring guides Bibliography of books offering starting points for almost any topic encountered in archaeology With a full subject and author index to help the reader navigate the information, this Handbookis the most comprehensive guide to sources and resources available in British and Irish Archaeology.