Search results for: the-linux-programming-interface

The Linux Programming Interface

Author : Michael Kerrisk
File Size : 88.25 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 148
Read : 1160
Download »
The Linux Programming Interface (TLPI) is the definitive guide to the Linux and UNIX programming interface—the interface employed by nearly every application that runs on a Linux or UNIX system. In this authoritative work, Linux programming expert Michael Kerrisk provides detailed descriptions of the system calls and library functions that you need in order to master the craft of system programming, and accompanies his explanations with clear, complete example programs. You'll find descriptions of over 500 system calls and library functions, and more than 200 example programs, 88 tables, and 115 diagrams. You'll learn how to: –Read and write files efficiently –Use signals, clocks, and timers –Create processes and execute programs –Write secure programs –Write multithreaded programs using POSIX threads –Build and use shared libraries –Perform interprocess communication using pipes, message queues, shared memory, and semaphores –Write network applications with the sockets API While The Linux Programming Interface covers a wealth of Linux-specific features, including epoll, inotify, and the /proc file system, its emphasis on UNIX standards (POSIX.1-2001/SUSv3 and POSIX.1-2008/SUSv4) makes it equally valuable to programmers working on other UNIX platforms. The Linux Programming Interface is the most comprehensive single-volume work on the Linux and UNIX programming interface, and a book that's destined to become a new classic.

The Linux Programming Interface

Author : Michael Kerrisk
File Size : 22.14 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 247
Read : 205
Download »
The Linux Programming Interface (TLPI) is the definitive guide to the Linux and UNIX programming interface—the interface employed by nearly every application that runs on a Linux or UNIX system. In this authoritative work, Linux programming expert Michael Kerrisk provides detailed descriptions of the system calls and library functions that you need in order to master the craft of system programming, and accompanies his explanations with clear, complete example programs. You'll find descriptions of over 500 system calls and library functions, and more than 200 example programs, 88 tables, and 115 diagrams. You'll learn how to: –Read and write files efficiently –Use signals, clocks, and timers –Create processes and execute programs –Write secure programs –Write multithreaded programs using POSIX threads –Build and use shared libraries –Perform interprocess communication using pipes, message queues, shared memory, and semaphores –Write network applications with the sockets API While The Linux Programming Interface covers a wealth of Linux-specific features, including epoll, inotify, and the /proc file system, its emphasis on UNIX standards (POSIX.1-2001/SUSv3 and POSIX.1-2008/SUSv4) makes it equally valuable to programmers working on other UNIX platforms. The Linux Programming Interface is the most comprehensive single-volume work on the Linux and UNIX programming interface, and a book that's destined to become a new classic.

The Linux Programmer s Toolbox

Author : John Fusco
File Size : 63.78 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 108
Read : 790
Download »
Master the Linux Tools That Will Make You a More Productive, Effective Programmer The Linux Programmer's Toolbox helps you tap into the vast collection of open source tools available for GNU/Linux. Author John Fusco systematically describes the most useful tools available on most GNU/Linux distributions using concise examples that you can easily modify to meet your needs. You'll start by learning the basics of downloading, building, and installing open source projects. You'll then learn how open source tools are distributed, and what to look for to avoid wasting time on projects that aren't ready for you. Next, you'll learn the ins and outs of building your own projects. Fusco also demonstrates what to look for in a text editor, and may even show you a few new tricks in your favorite text editor. You'll enhance your knowledge of the Linux kernel by learning how it interacts with your software. Fusco walks you through the fundamentals of the Linux kernel with simple, thought-provoking examples that illustrate the principles behind the operating system. Then he shows you how to put this knowledge to use with more advanced tools. He focuses on how to interpret output from tools like sar, vmstat, valgrind, strace, and apply it to your application; how to take advantage of various programming APIs to develop your own tools; and how to write code that monitors itself. Next, Fusco covers tools that help you enhance the performance of your software. He explains the principles behind today's multicore CPUs and demonstrates how to squeeze the most performance from these systems. Finally, you'll learn tools and techniques to debug your code under any circumstances. Coverage includes Maximizing productivity with editors, revision control tools, source code browsers, and "beautifiers" Interpreting the kernel: what your tools are telling you Understanding processes–and the tools available for managing them Tracing and resolving application bottlenecks with gprof and valgrind Streamlining and automating the documentation process Rapidly finding help, solutions, and workarounds when you need them Optimizing program code with sar, vmstat, iostat, and other tools Debugging IPC with shell commands: signals, pipes, sockets, files, and IPC objects Using printf, gdb, and other essential debugging tools Foreword Preface Acknowledgments About the Author Chapter 1 Downloading and Installing Open Source Tools Chapter 2 Building from Source Chapter 3 Finding Help Chapter 4 Editing and Maintaining Source Files Chapter 5 What Every Developer Should Know about the Kernel Chapter 6 Understanding Processes Chapter 7 Communication between Processes Chapter 8 Debugging IPC with Shell Commands Chapter 9 Performance Tuning Chapter 10 Debugging Index

Learn You a Haskell for Great Good

Author : Miran Lipovaca
File Size : 46.78 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 264
Read : 674
Download »
It's all in the name: Learn You a Haskell for Great Good! is a hilarious, illustrated guide to this complex functional language. Packed with the author's original artwork, pop culture references, and most importantly, useful example code, this book teaches functional fundamentals in a way you never thought possible. You'll start with the kid stuff: basic syntax, recursion, types and type classes. Then once you've got the basics down, the real black belt master-class begins: you'll learn to use applicative functors, monads, zippers, and all the other mythical Haskell constructs you've only read about in storybooks. As you work your way through the author's imaginative (and occasionally insane) examples, you'll learn to: –Laugh in the face of side effects as you wield purely functional programming techniques –Use the magic of Haskell's "laziness" to play with infinite sets of data –Organize your programs by creating your own types, type classes, and modules –Use Haskell's elegant input/output system to share the genius of your programs with the outside world Short of eating the author's brain, you will not find a better way to learn this powerful language than reading Learn You a Haskell for Great Good!

Land of Lisp

Author : Conrad Barski
File Size : 39.61 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 729
Read : 484
Download »
Lisp has been hailed as the world’s most powerful programming language, but its cryptic syntax and academic reputation can be enough to scare off even experienced programmers. Those dark days are finally over—Land of Lisp brings the power of functional programming to the people! With his brilliantly quirky comics and out-of-this-world games, longtime Lisper Conrad Barski teaches you the mysteries of Common Lisp. You’ll start with the basics, like list manipulation, I/O, and recursion, then move on to more complex topics like macros, higher order programming, and domain-specific languages. Then, when your brain overheats, you can kick back with an action-packed comic book interlude! Along the way you’ll create (and play) games like Wizard Adventure, a text adventure with a whiskey-soaked twist, and Grand Theft Wumpus, the most violent version of Hunt the Wumpus the world has ever seen. You'll learn to: –Master the quirks of Lisp’s syntax and semantics –Write concise and elegant functional programs –Use macros, create domain-specific languages, and learn other advanced Lisp techniques –Create your own web server, and use it to play browser-based games –Put your Lisp skills to the test by writing brain-melting games like Dice of Doom and Orc Battle With Land of Lisp, the power of functional programming is yours to wield.

Hands On System Programming with Linux

Author : Kaiwan N. Billimoria
File Size : 68.40 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 392
Read : 759
Download »
Get up and running with system programming concepts in Linux Key Features Acquire insight on Linux system architecture and its programming interfaces Get to grips with core concepts such as process management, signalling and pthreads Packed with industry best practices and dozens of code examples Book Description The Linux OS and its embedded and server applications are critical components of today's software infrastructure in a decentralized, networked universe. The industry's demand for proficient Linux developers is only rising with time. Hands-On System Programming with Linux gives you a solid theoretical base and practical industry-relevant descriptions, and covers the Linux system programming domain. It delves into the art and science of Linux application programming-- system architecture, process memory and management, signaling, timers, pthreads, and file IO. This book goes beyond the use API X to do Y approach; it explains the concepts and theories required to understand programming interfaces and design decisions, the tradeoffs made by experienced developers when using them, and the rationale behind them. Troubleshooting tips and techniques are included in the concluding chapter. By the end of this book, you will have gained essential conceptual design knowledge and hands-on experience working with Linux system programming interfaces. What you will learn Explore the theoretical underpinnings of Linux system architecture Understand why modern OSes use virtual memory and dynamic memory APIs Get to grips with dynamic memory issues and effectively debug them Learn key concepts and powerful system APIs related to process management Effectively perform file IO and use signaling and timers Deeply understand multithreading concepts, pthreads APIs, synchronization and scheduling Who this book is for Hands-On System Programming with Linux is for Linux system engineers, programmers, or anyone who wants to go beyond using an API set to understanding the theoretical underpinnings and concepts behind powerful Linux system programming APIs. To get the most out of this book, you should be familiar with Linux at the user-level logging in, using shell via the command line interface, the ability to use tools such as find, grep, and sort. Working knowledge of the C programming language is required. No prior experience with Linux systems programming is assumed.

Advanced Linux Programming

Author : CodeSourcery LLC
File Size : 46.75 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 901
Read : 586
Download »
This is the eBook version of the printed book. If the print book includes a CD-ROM, this content is not included within the eBook version. Advanced Linux Programming is divided into two parts. The first covers generic UNIX system services, but with a particular eye towards Linux specific information. This portion of the book will be of use even to advanced programmers who have worked with other Linux systems since it will cover Linux specific details and differences. For programmers without UNIX experience, it will be even more valuable. The second section covers material that is entirely Linux specific. These are truly advanced topics, and are the techniques that the gurus use to build great applications. While this book will focus mostly on the Application Programming Interface (API) provided by the Linux kernel and the C library, a preliminary introduction to the development tools available will allow all who purchase the book to make immediate use of Linux.

Untrapped Value

Author : Dave Erickson
File Size : 49.23 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 160
Read : 801
Download »
Mankind has invested vast resources (time, manhours, computer machinery sunk costs, maintenance, building space, heating, venting, cooling, and so on) into software for all kinds of digital and analog hardware for over sixty years. Far longer if you consider punched cards, and so on. In the end, most of the source code ends in the waste heap of history. Old code gets forgotten, rubbished, and a new wave of developers is forced to recreate new versions of old ideas. People get promoted, graduate from college, and leave to get married; before they do they don’t have time, don’t believe in the priority, and don’t place the code where others can find it to make an important curation of their software; and by this donate it to future generations, worldwide, the society at large. If organizations, at the other end of the spectrum, would realign software for a legacy of centuries instead of product runs, mankind can preserve the sunk costs, speed up advancement, and make software impact far wider when it’s made in a reusable form. People move to a new job, and remake linked lists, factory classes, or ring buffers in the new language of the day, or within the design paradigm of the latest fad management. It’s kind of insane when you think about it, people spend many years getting a consumer product working, finely tuned and profitable. Then two companies merge, product lines are unified or obsoleted, and some or all of the intellectual property gets forgotten in a corner as one team is merged and the others retire to golf, or the pool. While filling in cardboard boxes of stuff as they leave, does anyone drag out the old tapes and floppies to make sure the new guys aren’t starting by reinventing the wheel? Why? The culture has a serious misunderstanding of where the value, where the intellectual property comes from and where it gets stored. This wasteful malaise needs to change. This book is a launching point, not a destination. It is designed to evolve in small, incremental ways along with your reusable software development guide- lines, over many years. From novice coders starting out to experienced, and jaded, software managers; all practical and technical issues are presented in two natural layers ( for the simplest stratifications - explained in Section 8)- one, the manifesto paints broad strokes in a proscriptive manner about how to steer your organization gradually towards code for longevity, and two, the toolbox brings together a set of free tools to get you started, a bunch of tried and true realities about what makes sense while plumbing inside someone else’s code, and realistic high level strategies to make sense of what you find. There’s no practical way for this small book to cover every topic fully, the manuals alone for autotools are several thousand pages. But the goal is a comprehensive perspective, and that can be achieved, quickly. This book provides a wider perspective, by looking back on the history of software reuse, and the development cycle not as a painful target to meet and then forget, but as a stepping stone that brings on differing teams, ramping up and ramping down, to meet the custom needs of every stage of software. Doesn’t that sound more productive, on the face of it? Maintenance was the old end of software development, the goal of software reuse is to make all software a continual maintenance cycle for mankind. The goal is to accelerate the next generation farther and faster, perhaps into the stars. But even in a humble grounded form, make impacts felt worldwide. Easier to start, longer to impact, cheaper to deliver. The goal of all software reuse: to untrap all the value stored there by society. For each chapter, I parallel the main ideas of reuse with a Buddha koan. Enigmatic ideas smashed together like koans are like the perfect proscriptive advice: they present paradoxical and enigmatic ideas that appear ungrounded in the importance of the day, until you wander into a situation, perhaps a con- flict of ideas, and the answer leaps out of the confusion - linked to your brain by the wise words of a koan. It all becomes clear, with time, patience, and practice. Like the discipline needed to transform people’s habits to instill software reuse, Buddhism is a practice. It is a “life raft built for one”, as the expres- sion goes. There are many aspects, many dimensions, to consider as important factors in making software more useful to a wider group. Like any discipline, there will be areas people stumble, and other areas where people excel, and areas that take a great deal of resources to conquer. And conquer them you shall, with some humble guidance and a positive outlook. Executive Summary: What is this book about? Software, made with quality from original sources repurposed, in many agreed standpoints of comprehension, to meet a wider audience that benefits mankind for generations instead of fiscal quarters so mankind can maximize benefit from it for all society. Who may benefit? Mankind should be interested in and profit from software reuse, because re- ducing software development time reduces energy greenhouse gas emissions, reduces computing machinery wear and tear, provides more ways to accelerate more people to work on software with security, mission-critical, and real-time requirements; it provides easier starts for younger scientists and engineers in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) to profit from and accelerate their learning and contribution to technology. Why should society care? Society has learned from enough bad ideas and bad methods in the progeny of software to make optimization a priority for everyone’s advancement tomor- row. When? The change needs to happen tomorrow, and this book points a way towards it. How? By attacking the top and the bottom of software development at the same time: the first half of this book describes the ideas from a managerial, or high level perspective; the second half delves into the nuts and bolts things anyone might use to get started.

Mastering Embedded Linux Programming

Author : Frank Vasquez
File Size : 31.73 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 750
Read : 845
Download »
Harness the power of Linux to create versatile and robust embedded solutions Key FeaturesLearn how to develop and configure robust embedded Linux devicesExplore the new features of Linux 5.4 and the Yocto Project 3.1 (Dunfell)Discover different ways to debug and profile your code in both user space and the Linux kernelBook Description If you're looking for a book that will demystify embedded Linux, then you've come to the right place. Mastering Embedded Linux Programming is a fully comprehensive guide that can serve both as means to learn new things or as a handy reference. The first few chapters of this book will break down the fundamental elements that underpin all embedded Linux projects: the toolchain, the bootloader, the kernel, and the root filesystem. After that, you will learn how to create each of these elements from scratch and automate the process using Buildroot and the Yocto Project. As you progress, the book will show you how to implement an effective storage strategy for flash memory chips and install updates to a device remotely once it's deployed. You'll also learn about the key aspects of writing code for embedded Linux, such as how to access hardware from apps, the implications of writing multi-threaded code, and techniques to manage memory in an efficient way. The final chapters demonstrate how to debug your code, whether it resides in apps or in the Linux kernel itself. You'll also cover the different tracers and profilers that are available for Linux so that you can quickly pinpoint any performance bottlenecks in your system. By the end of this Linux book, you'll be able to create efficient and secure embedded devices using Linux. What you will learnUse Buildroot and the Yocto Project to create embedded Linux systemsTroubleshoot BitBake build failures and streamline your Yocto development workflowUpdate IoT devices securely in the field using Mender or balenaPrototype peripheral additions by reading schematics, modifying device trees, soldering breakout boards, and probing pins with a logic analyzerInteract with hardware without having to write kernel device driversDivide your system up into services supervised by BusyBox runitDebug devices remotely using GDB and measure the performance of systems using tools such as perf, ftrace, eBPF, and CallgrindWho this book is for If you're a systems software engineer or system administrator who wants to learn how to implement Linux on embedded devices, then this book is for you. It's also aimed at embedded systems engineers accustomed to programming for low-power microcontrollers, who can use this book to help make the leap to high-speed systems on chips that can run Linux. Anyone who develops hardware that needs to run Linux will find something useful in this book – but before you get started, you'll need a solid grasp on POSIX standard, C programming, and shell scripting.

Beginning Linux Programming

Author : Neil Matthew
File Size : 38.26 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 205
Read : 618
Download »
Beginning Linux Programming, Fourth Edition continues its unique approach to teaching UNIX programming in a simple and structured way on the Linux platform. Through the use of detailed and realistic examples, students learn by doing, and are able to move from being a Linux beginner to creating custom applications in Linux. The book introduces fundamental concepts beginning with the basics of writing Unix programs in C, and including material on basic system calls, file I/O, interprocess communication (for getting programs to work together), and shell programming. Parallel to this, the book introduces the toolkits and libraries for working with user interfaces, from simpler terminal mode applications to X and GTK+ for graphical user interfaces. Advanced topics are covered in detail such as processes, pipes, semaphores, socket programming, using MySQL, writing applications for the GNOME or the KDE desktop, writing device drivers, POSIX Threads, and kernel programming for the latest Linux Kernel.