Search results for: the-continuations-of-the-old-french-perceval-of-chretien-de-troyes-volume-1

The Continuations of the Old French Perceval of Chretien de Troyes Volume 1

Author : William Roach
File Size : 31.16 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 315
Read : 1107
Download »

The Continuations of the Old French Perceval of Chr tien de Troyes

Author : Lucien Foulet
File Size : 73.75 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 187
Read : 1221
Download »

The Continuations of the Old French Perceval of Chretien de Troyes Volume 2

Author : William Roach
File Size : 43.77 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 571
Read : 423
Download »

The Continuations of the Old French perceval of Chretien de Troyes Volume 3 Part 1

Author : William Roach
File Size : 24.56 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 531
Read : 205
Download »

The continuations of the Old French Perceval of Chretien de Troyes

Author :
File Size : 30.87 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 949
Read : 1269
Download »

The Continuations of the Old French Perceval of Chretien de Troyes The first continuation redaction of Mss TVD

Author : de Troyes Chrétien
File Size : 37.7 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 307
Read : 639
Download »

The Danger of Romance

Author : Karen Sullivan
File Size : 41.98 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 729
Read : 760
Download »
The curious paradox of romance is that, throughout its history, this genre has been dismissed as trivial and unintellectual, yet people have never ceased to flock to it with enthusiasm and even fervor. In contemporary contexts, we devour popular romance and fantasy novels like The Lord of the Rings, Harry Potter, and Game of Thrones, reference them in conversations, and create online communities to expound, passionately and intelligently, upon their characters and worlds. But romance is “unrealistic,” critics say, doing readers a disservice by not accurately representing human experiences. It is considered by some to be a distraction from real literature, a distraction from real life, and little more. Yet is it possible that romance is expressing a truth—and a truth unrecognized by realist genres? The Arthurian literature of the Middle Ages, Karen Sullivan argues, consistently ventriloquizes in its pages the criticisms that were being made of romance at the time, and implicitly defends itself against those criticisms. The Danger of Romance shows that the conviction that ordinary reality is the only reality is itself an assumption, and one that can blind those who hold it to the extraordinary phenomena that exist around them. It demonstrates that that which is rare, ephemeral, and inexplicable is no less real than that which is commonplace, long-lasting, and easily accounted for. If romance continues to appeal to audiences today, whether in its Arthurian prototype or in its more recent incarnations, it is because it confirms the perception—or even the hope—of a beauty and truth in the world that realist genres deny.

Codex and Context Reading Old French Verse Narrative in Manuscript Volume I

Author : Keith Busby
File Size : 50.54 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 899
Read : 1049
Download »

Codex and Context Reading Old French Verse Narrative in Manuscript Volume II

Author : Keith Busby
File Size : 61.11 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 680
Read : 1077
Download »

The Romances of Chretien de Troyes

Author : Joseph J. Duggan
File Size : 24.39 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 616
Read : 653
Download »
Twelfth-century French poet Chrétien de Troyes was one of the most influential figures in Western literature, for his romantic poems on the legend of King Arthur gave rise to a tradition of storytelling that continues to this day. This important and fascinating book is a study of all of Chrétien’s work. Joseph J. Duggan begins with an introduction that sets Chrétien within the social and intellectual currents of his time. He then organizes the book in chapters that focus on major issues in Chrétien’s romances rather than on individual works, topics that range from the importance of kinship and genealogy to standards of secular moral responsibility and from Chrétien’s art of narration to his representation of knighthood. Duggan offers new perspectives on many of these themes: in a chapter on the influence of Celtic mythology, for example, he gives special attention to the ways Chrétien integrated portrayals of motivation with mythic themes and characters, and in discussing the Grail romance, he explores the parallels between Perceval’s and Gauvain’s adventures.