The Hat Industry of Luton and its Buildings

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Author: Katie Carmichael,David McOmish,David Grech

Publisher: Historic England

ISBN: 184802326X

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 2330

Although perhaps best known today as the home of Vauxhall Motors, Luton's industrial roots run much deeper. Long before it became associated with motor cars, Luton was the centre of ladies' hat production in this country - a success founded upon the earlier regional industry of straw-plaiting. Many surrounding towns and villages fed into the industry and helped to make the region globally renowned. At its peak in the 1930s, the region was producing as many as 70 million hats in a single year; however, it entered a rapid decline following the Second World War from which it never recovered. This has left Luton, Dunstable and a number of other local towns with a challenging inheritance of neglected and decaying fragments of a once vital industry. This book is intended to be an introduction and guide to the area's historical depth and to its distinctive and varied character, seeking to explain the development of the region as the centre of the hatting industry in the south and exploring the lives of the people working there during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. The historic links between the surviving building stock and the hatting industry are assessed and the book highlights the significance of the surviving fabric and the potential of the historic environment within future conservation and regeneration plans.

British and Irish Archaeology

A Bibliographical Guide

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Author: Anthony King

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9780719018756

Category: Excavations (Archaeology)

Page: 324

View: 5496

Geography

Journal of the Geographical Association

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Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Geography

Page: N.A

View: 7188

Includes section "Reviews" and other bibliographical material.

Society and Economy in Modern Britain 1700-1850

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Author: Richard Brown

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134982771

Category: History

Page: 496

View: 5222

For both contemporaries and later historians the Industrial Revolution is viewed as a turning point' in modern British history. There is no doubt that change occurred, but what was the nature of that change and how did affect rural and urban society? Beginning with an examination of the nature of history and Britain in 1700, this volume focuses on the economic and social aspects of the Industrial Revolution. Unlike many previous textbooks on the same period, it emphasizes British history, and deals with developments in Wales, Scotland, and Ireland in their own right. It is the emphasis on the diversity, not the uniformity of experience, on continuities as well as change in this crucial period of development, which makes this volume distinctive. In his companion title Richard Brown completes his examination of the period and looks at the changes that took place in Britain's political system and in its religious affiliations.

The Making of the British Landscape

How We Have Transformed the Land, from Prehistory to Today

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Author: Francis Pryor

Publisher: Penguin UK

ISBN: 014194336X

Category: History

Page: 832

View: 9162

This is the changing story of Britain as it has been preserved in our fields, roads, buildings, towns and villages, mountains, forests and islands. From our suburban streets that still trace out the boundaries of long vanished farms to the Norfolk Broads, formed when medieval peat pits flooded, from the ceremonial landscapes of Stonehenge to the spread of the railways - evidence of how man's effect on Britain is everywhere. In The Making of the British Landscape, eminent historian, archaeologist and farmer, Francis Pryor explains how to read these clues to understand the fascinating history of our land and of how people have lived on it throughout time. Covering both the urban and rural and packed with pictures, maps and drawings showing everything from how we can still pick out Bronze Age fields on Bodmin Moor to how the Industrial Revolution really changed our landscape, this book makes us look afresh at our surroundings and really see them for the first time.

Handbook for British and Irish Archaeology

Sources and Resources

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Author: Cherry Lavell

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Social Science

Page: 421

View: 4393

How do states distinguish friends from enemies, partners from competitors, and communities from outsiders? Community Under Anarchy shows how the development of common social identities among political elites can lead to deeper, more cohesive forms of cooperation than what has been previously envisioned by traditional theories of international relations. Drawing from recent advances in social theory and constructivist approaches, Bruce Cronin demonstrates how these cohesive structures evolve from a series of discrete events and processes that help to diminish the conceptual boundaries dividing societies. Community Under Anarchy supports this thesis through a new and original interpretation of the Concert of Europe, the Holy Alliance, and the political integration of Italy and Germany. In the wake of the upheavals created by the French Revolution and the revolutions of 1848, political elites helped to validate new forms of governance by creating transnational reference groups from which they could draw legitimacy. As a result, European states were able to overcome the polarizing effects of anarchy and create a concert system, a common security association, and two amalgamated security communities. The empirical cases demonstrate how socially derived identities can shape state preferences and create new roles for state leaders.

The Fens

Discovering England's Ancient Depths

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Author: Francis Pryor

Publisher: Head of Zeus Ltd

ISBN: 1786692236

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 9095

The Fens are a distinctive, complex, man-made and little understood landscape. Francis Pryor has lived in, excavated, farmed, walked – and loved – the Fen Country for more than forty years: its levels and drains, its soaring churches, its magnificent medieval buildings. In The Fens, he counterpoints the history of the Fen landscape and its transformation – the great drainage projects that created the Old and New Bedford Rivers, the Ouse Washes and Bedford Levels, the rise of prosperous towns and cities, such as King's Lynn, Cambridge, Wisbech, Boston and Spalding – with the story of his own discovery of it as an archaeologist. Interweaving personal experience, the graft and the grime of the dig, and lyrical evocations of place, Francis Pryor offers a unique portrait of a neglected by remarkable area of England.