Search results for: the-arctic-frontier

The Arctic Frontier

Author : Canadian Institute of International Affairs
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The Arctic Frontier

Author : Canadian Institute of International Affairs
File Size : 90.29 MB
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Eleven papers discussing Canada's place in the Arctic community. Covering sovereignty, administration, resources and defence.

The Arctic Frontier

Author : R. St. J. MacDonald (ed)
File Size : 90.97 MB
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The Arctic Frontier in International Relations

Author : Kern Craig
File Size : 39.40 MB
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This comprehensive report collates scattered information about the Arctic Region in general and the Arctic Ocean in particular. And logical conclusions are drawn given the factual evidence presented. Besides an introduction and conclusion, it consists of eight sections concerning: Arctic Nations, Claims and Agreements, International Law, Pending Claims, Arctic Warming, Arctic Business, Arctic Pollution, and Arctic Relations. Together this information serves as the basis for a college course on Arctic Affairs.

Settlers on the Edge

Author : Niobe Thompson
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Based on extensive research in the Arctic Russian region of Chukotka, Settlers on the Edge is the first English-language account of settler life anywhere in the circumpolar north to appear since Robert Paine's The White Arctic (1977), and the first to explore the experiences of Soviet-era migrants to the far north. Niobe Thompson describes the remarkable transformation of a population once dedicated to establishing colonial power on a northern frontier into a rooted community of locals now resisting a renewed colonial project. He also provides unique insights into the future of identity politics in the Arctic, the role of resource capital and the oligarchs in the Russian provinces, and the fundamental human questions of belonging and transience.

The Arctic Frontier sound Recording

Author : R. St. J. (Ronald St. John) Macdonald
File Size : 48.44 MB
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Development on Ice Global Transportation Infrastructure and the Arctic Frontier

Author : Mia Bennett
File Size : 38.13 MB
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At the end of the nineteenth century, the seeming unavailability of "free" land elicited declarations of the closure of the frontier. But in the twenty-first century, it seems like more frontiers are opening than ever before. The Arctic is a prime example of this trend. With climate change melting away the Arctic ice cap, multinational corporations, national governments, and indigenous corporations all see opportunities for development. Even as the polar seas and the lands around them are rapidly and unpredictably changing, plans are underway to build new infrastructure like ports along Russia's northern coast and a highway to the Arctic Ocean in Canada. More than geophysical factors, however, are motivating this infrastructure push. Political, economic, and technological drivers are leading developmental interests to seek to shorten the distance between global markets by bridging the supposed "infrastructure gaps" that exist in not only the Arctic, but also places like Central Asia, Siberia, and beyond. Using a mix of qualitative methods and remote sensing, this dissertation analyzes the scalar politics of infrastructure development in two contemporary frontiers: the Arctic and Russian Far East. This research first aims to explain how contemporary frontiers are conjured as spaces in need of development and globally articulated infrastructure by focusing on the Arctic as a regional example (Ch. 1) and the Canadian Arctic as a national example (Ch. 2). I then use two case studies to illustrate how transportation infrastructure projects are spearheaded both from within and outside frontier spaces, drawing on the cases of the indigenous Inuvialuit people and their role in lobbying for and building Canada's first highway to the Arctic Ocean (Ch. 3) and the Singaporean government's foray into Arctic development initiatives (Ch. 4). Expanding beyond traditional methods in political geography, I review advances made in using multitemporal night light imagery to study socioeconomic dynamics (Ch. 5) and apply techniques from this field to study regional development in Russia and China (Ch. 6), two countries that experienced vastly different development trajectories following the collapse of communism. Coming full circle, I consider how post-Soviet Russia, suffering from a major infrastructural deficit that is illustrated both by fieldwork and remote sensing, may be a lucrative yet precarious investment site for China's Belt and Road Initiative (Ch. 7). A central conclusion of this research is that the development of frontiers is politically and economically conditioned, locally negotiated, and cyclical rather than linear.

A Wretched and Precarious Situation In Search of the Last Arctic Frontier

Author : David Welky
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A Booklist Best Literary Travel Book (2017) and Kirkus Reviews Best Nonfiction Book (2016) “A penetrating study of human character in a challenging environment. . . . [David Welky’s] seamless narrative, chilling at times and always thought-provoking, transports the reader to a time when the Arctic was virtually as harsh and inaccessible a place as the Moon or Mars.” —Natural History From a snow-swept hill in the ice fields northwest of Greenland, famed Arctic explorer Robert E. Peary spots a line of mysterious peaks dotting the horizon. In 1906, he names that distant, uncharted territory “Crocker Land.” Years later, two of Peary’s disciples, George Borup and Donald MacMillan, take the brave steps Peary never did: with a team of amateur adventurers and intrepid native guides, they endeavor to reach this unknown land and fill in the last blank space on the globe. What follows is hardship and mishap the likes of which none of the explorers could possibly have imagined. From howling blizzards and desperate food shortages to crime and tragedy, the explorers experience a remarkable journey of endurance, courage, and hope. Set in one of the world’s most inhospitable places, A Wretched and Precarious Situation is an Arctic tale unlike any other.

Trip to the Arctic Frontier

Author :
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Join Lorenzo and Lucy Bear on their latest adventure to the Arctic Frontier. Explore the snow-covered terrain, as they make their way visit Lorenzo's Grand-Bears. But watch out! There are creatures of snow that lurk in the mountains, where the Evergreens grow.It's the Adventures of Lorenzo the Bear join him on his trip to the Arctic Frontier!

Pipeline Dreams

Author : Mark Nuttall
File Size : 38.32 MB
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Interest in the Arctic as one of the world's last energy frontiers is increasing. The indigenous peoples of the circumpolar North have long been involved in struggles to make sense of, adapt to, and negotiate the impacts and consequences of resource development, but they have also been involved in struggles to gain some measure of control over development as well as to benefit from it. With a focus on the North American Arctic, Pipeline Dreams discusses how dreams of extracting resource wealth have been significant in influencing and shaping relations between indigenous and non-indigenous peoples, as well as for the opening up of northern frontier regions to economic development. Pipeline Dreams looks at the emergence of the circumpolar North as an imagined hydrocarbon province and, through a detailed discussion of plans to explore for oil and gas and to build pipelines across the Arctic and Subarctic lands, it discusses a number of case studies from Canada and Alaska, as well as from other circumpolar regions, which illustrate some of the diverse perspectives, interests and concerns of indigenous peoples. The book considers and reflects upon the idea of the Arctic as a resource frontier and the concerns expressed by a variety of groups and commentators over the social and environmental impacts of oil and gas development, as well as the opportunities that oil and gas activities may bring to both the long-term viability of indigenous and local communities, and to the sustainability of indigenous and local livelihoods, cultures, and societies.

The Arctic world an exclusive frontier

Author : Louis Rey
File Size : 21.57 MB
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International Disputes and Cultural Ideas in the Canadian Arctic

Author : Danita Catherine Burke
File Size : 57.19 MB
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This book explores the Canadian relationship with its portion of the Arctic region which revolves around the dramatic split between the appearance of absent-minded governance, bordering on indifference toward the region, and the raging nationalism during moments of actual and perceived challenge toward the sovereignty of the imagined “Canadian Arctic region.” Canada’s nationalistic relationship with the Arctic region is often discussed as a reactionary phenomenon to the Americanization of Canada and the product of government propaganda. As this book illustrates, however, the complexity and evolution of the Canadian relationship with the Arctic region and its implication for Canada’s approach toward international relations requires a more in-depth exploration Please be aware than an error has been noted for Table 1.1 on page 71. In this table the sub-category “Inuit” is mislabelled. It should read “Native Indians and Inuit” as the data presented represents this Canadian census sub-category which calculated all indigenous peoples and Inuit peoples together.

Frozen Frontier The Story of the Arctic

Author : R.. Frank
File Size : 36.2 MB
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Frozen Frontier

Author : Frank Xavier Ross
File Size : 51.20 MB
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The New Foreign Policy Frontier

Author : Heather A. Conley
File Size : 77.31 MB
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Since World War II, the Arctic has been a region of geostrategic importance to the United States. As unprecedented environmental transformation occurs in the Arctic, this region will increase in significance. When historians look back at this critical opportunity to develop U.S. Arctic policy, we do not want the question to be posed, “Who lost the Arctic?” but rather, “How did the United States win the Arctic?” Crafting U.S. policy toward the Arctic, however, is a complex and challenging undertaking. Arctic policy must respond to the economic, environmental, security, and geopolitical concerns that confront the region. When the Barack Obama administration came into office in January 2009, it accepted and left unchanged the recently adopted Arctic strategy of the George W. Bush administration. In its second term, it is now time for the Obama administration to enhance U.S. Arctic policy by updating and prioritizing National Security Presidential Directive 66/Homeland Security Presidential Directive 25 (NSPD-66/HSPD-25), improving interagency cooperation, enhancing U.S. international and public diplomacy related to the Arctic, and increasing the focus of senior U.S. officials. These activities must begin now if the United States is to prepare for and fully maximize its chairmanship of the Arctic Council beginning in 2015.

International Relations in the Arctic

Author : Leif Christian Jensen
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As the ice around the Arctic landmass recedes progressively further each year, the territory has become a flashpoint in world affairs. New and lucrative trade routes from East to West are now becoming accessible for shipping lanes and military deployment, and the Arctic is known to be home to large gas and oil reserves. Yet the territorial boundaries of the region remain ill-defined. In response to these geographical changes the Scandinavian countries, especially Denmark and Norway, have begun staking large proprietary claims in the face of pressure from the major powers – Russia, Canada, the US and China – for the trade routes to be designated as International Waters. Here, Norwegian scholar Leif Christian Jensen shows how Norway has undergone a positional shift after declaring its assertive position on the Arctic in 2005. Its disputes with Russia have created a new foreign policy dilemma, and a new set of 'red-lines' in Norwegian policy. Is Norway, as it would like to be seen, an environmentally friendly, peaceful, 'enlightened' nation? Or does this geopolitical shift in world affairs necessitate a new and more aggressive Scandinavia? International Relations in the Arctic makes a timely contribution to the 'turn to the North' in International Relations and Political Science.

Frozen Frontier

Author : Frank (Jr.)
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Oil and Gas Technologies for the Arctic and Deepwater

Author :
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Norway and Her Soviet Neighbour

Author : Frank Brenchley
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Competing Arctic Futures

Author : Nina Wormbs
File Size : 66.22 MB
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This edited collection explores how narratives about the future of the Arctic have been produced historically up until the present day. The contemporary deterministic and monolithic narrative is shown to be only one of several possible ways forward. This book problematizes the dominant prediction that there will be increased shipping and resource extraction as the ice melts and shows how this seemingly inevitable future has consequences for the action that can be taken in the present. This collection looks to historical projections about the future of the Arctic, evaluating why some voices have been heard and championed, while others remain marginalised. It questions how these historical perspectives have shaped resource allocation and governance structures to understand the forces behind change in the Arctic region. Considering the history of individuals and institutions, their political and economic networks and their perceived power, the essays in this collection offer new perspectives on how the future of the Arctic has been produced and communicated.