Search results for: terroir

Terroir

Author : James E. Wilson (Geologist)
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The French word terroir is used to describe all the ecological factors that make a particular type of wine special to the region of its origin. James E. Wilson uses his training as a geologist and his years of research in the wine regions of France to fully examine the concept of terroir. The result combines natural history, social history, and scientific study, making this a unique book that all wine connoisseurs and professionals will want close at hand. In Part One Wilson introduces the full range of environmental factors that together form terroir. He explains France's geological foundation; its soil, considered the "soul" of a vineyard; the various climates and microclimates; the vines, their history and how each type has evolved; and the role that humans--from ancient monks to modern enologists--have played in viticulture. Part Two examines the history and habitat of each of France's major wine regions. Wilson explores the question of why one site yields great wines while an adjacent site yields wines of lesser quality. He also looks at cultural influences such as migration and trade and at the adaptations made by centuries of vignerons to produce distinctive wine styles. Wilson skillfully presents both technical information and personal anecdotes, and the book's photographs, maps, and geologic renderings are extremely helpful. The appendices contain a glossary and information on the labeling of French wines. With a wealth of information explained in clear English, Wilson's book enables wine readers to understand and appreciate the mystique of terroir. The French word terroir is used to describe all the ecological factors that make a particular type of wine special to the region of its origin. James E. Wilson uses his training as a geologist and his years of research in the wine regions of France to fully examine the concept of terroir. The result combines natural history, social history, and scientific study, making this a unique book that all wine connoisseurs and professionals will want close at hand. In Part One Wilson introduces the full range of environmental factors that together form terroir. He explains France's geological foundation; its soil, considered the "soul" of a vineyard; the various climates and microclimates; the vines, their history and how each type has evolved; and the role that humans--from ancient monks to modern enologists--have played in viticulture. Part Two examines the history and habitat of each of France's major wine regions. Wilson explores the question of why one site yields great wines while an adjacent site yields wines of lesser quality. He also looks at cultural influences such as migration and trade and at the adaptations made by centuries of vignerons to produce distinctive wine styles. Wilson skillfully presents both technical information and personal anecdotes, and the book's photographs, maps, and geologic renderings are extremely helpful. The appendices contain a glossary and information on the labeling of French wines. With a wealth of information explained in clear English, Wilson's book enables wine readers to understand and appreciate the mystique of terroir.

Wine Terroir and Climate Change

Author : John Gladstones
File Size : 78.9 MB
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This book is a scientific analysis of the soil and climatic factors affecting wine grape production, and thus, ultimately, wine itself. It provides a reasoned basis for the term 'terroir', and critically examines the science of climate change and how it could affect viticulture and winemaking. Dr John Gladstones is an internationally recognised authority on climate and viticulture, and among other achievements was instrumental in the establishment of the Margaret River wine district in Western Australia.'For anyone interested in the future interaction between climate, climate change and viticulture, this book simply has to be read. Dr John Gladstones's painstaking research is the foundation for his equally carefully constructed conclusions that robustly challenge mainstream opinions. - James Halliday

Terroir and Other Myths of Winegrowing

Author : Mark A. Matthews
File Size : 66.3 MB
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"A must-read for any wine grape grower or winemaker who has ever wrestled with the most important myths of winegrowing or debated them with colleagues—and that would be all of us! It is also a great read for any wine consumer interested in looking at 'the man behind the curtain,' so to speak: the myths promoted by wine writers, tasting room staff, sommeliers and other wine gatekeepers."—Wines & Vines "A meticulously researched volume that every serious sommelier should read . . . if only to disagree." —The Somm Journal Wine is a traditional product with traditional explanations. Oft-romanticized, Old World notions of how to create fine wine have been passed down through generations and continue to dominate popular discussions of wine quality. However, many of these beliefs predate science and remain isolated from advances in the understanding of how crops grow and fruit ripens. Allegiance to them has frequently impeded open-minded investigation into how grapevines interact with the environment, thus limiting innovation in winegrowing. In Terroir and Other Myths of Winegrowing, Mark A. Matthews applies a scientist’s skepticism and scrutiny to examine widely held beliefs about viticulture. Is terroir primarily a marketing ploy that obscures understanding of which environments really produce the best wine? Is reducing yield an imperative for high quality grapes and wine? What does it mean to have vines that are balanced or grapes that are physiologically mature? Matthews explores and dissects these and other questions to debunk the myths of winegrowing that may be holding us back from achieving a higher wine quality.

The Terroir of Whiskey

Author : Rob Arnold
File Size : 37.19 MB
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Look at the back label of a bottle of wine and you may well see a reference to its terroir, the total local environment of the vineyard that grew the grapes, from its soil to the climate. Winemakers universally accept that where a grape is grown influences its chemistry, which in turn changes the flavor of the wine. A detailed system has codified the idea that place matters to wine. So why don’t we feel the same way about whiskey? In this book, the master distiller Rob Arnold reveals how innovative whiskey producers are recapturing a sense of place to create distinctive, nuanced flavors. He takes readers on a world tour of whiskey and the science of flavor, stopping along the way at distilleries in Kentucky, New York, Texas, Ireland, and Scotland. Arnold puts the spotlight on a new generation of distillers, plant breeders, and local farmers who are bringing back long-forgotten grain flavors and creating new ones in pursuit of terroir. In the twentieth century, we inadvertently bred distinctive tastes out of grains in favor of high yields—but today’s artisans have teamed up to remove themselves from the commodity grain system, resurrect heirloom cereals, bring new varieties to life, and recapture the flavors of specific local ingredients. The Terroir of Whiskey makes the scientific and cultural cases that terroir is as important in whiskey as it is in wine.

Tasting French Terroir

Author : Thomas Parker
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This book explores the origins and significance of the French concept of terroir, demonstrating that the way the French eat their food and drink their wine today derives from a cultural mythology that developed between the Renaissance and the Revolution. Through close readings and an examination of little-known texts from diverse disciplines, Thomas Parker traces terroir’s evolution, providing insight into how gastronomic mores were linked to aesthetics in language, horticulture, and painting and how the French used the power of place to define the natural world, explain comportment, and frame France as a nation.

Biogeosciences and Wine the Management and Environmental Processes that Regulate the Terroir Effect in Space and Time

Author : Simone Priori
File Size : 59.28 MB
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The Power of the Terroir the Case Study of Prosecco Wine

Author : Diego Tomasi
File Size : 67.40 MB
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This book draws on an eight-year study carried out in the DOCG Prosecco area of Italy, a wine region known worldwide. It is unique in the sense that it is based on one of the most comprehensive investigations into terroir zoning ever performed in Italy. By drawing attention to the complex interrelations between environmental and human factors that influence the growth and production of the Glera grape, the study illustrates the distinct correlation between a wine and its ‘terroir’. It shows that the morphology of the sites, the meso and microclimate, the soil, the grapevine planting density, the trellising system, the yield of the vineyard, and the vine water status in the summer lead to unique combinations of grape maturity, acidity, and aroma that ultimately influence the sensory properties of the wines produced. Furthermore, the book details numerous technical and agronomic considerations, specific to the “Glera” grape variety, for different production strategies, including a section on the impact of climate change on cv “Glera” phenology. “The Power of the Terroir: the Case Study of Prosecco Wine” represents a valuable resource for anyone involved in studies or research activities in the fields of viticulture, climatology, agronomic sciences or soil sciences, but is also of interest to vine growers, professionals in the wine industry, and wine enthusiasts in general.

Terroir

Author : Patrick Bartholomew Reuter
File Size : 58.16 MB
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Wine Atlas of Australia

Author : James Halliday
File Size : 84.70 MB
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Written by one of the most respected wine critics in the world, this book is an authoritative and comprehensive guide to the wine-growing regions of Australia. With his usual wit and erudition, James Halliday introduces the reader to each area with an informative overview of its distinguishing features and history, as well as the wine styles and individual wines for which that region is known. He includes contact details for many of the regions' wineries, along with profiles of the wineries' styles and signature labels. Superbly produced with more than 90 color maps and hundreds of illuminating color photos throughout, this user-friendly atlas provides everyone from the devoted connoisseur to the armchair enthusiast with a thorough understanding of why Australia is rapidly becoming one of the world's top wine regions. Australian wines are known not only for their quality but also for their unequalled, rainbowlike spectrum of styles. With a career that spans over forty years, the author is a consummate authority on every aspect of the wine industry, from the planting and pruning of vines through the creation and marketing of the finished product. His passion for his subject is evident and his insights brilliantly demonstrate how variety, climate, terroir, and technology have combined to produce superb wines that are just beginning to make their mark on the world. Copub: Hardie Grant Books Written by one of the most respected wine critics in the world, this book is an authoritative and comprehensive guide to the wine-growing regions of Australia. With his usual wit and erudition, James Halliday introduces the reader to each area with an informative overview of its distinguishing features and history, as well as the wine styles and individual wines for which that region is known. He includes contact details for many of the regions' wineries, along with profiles of the wineries' styles and signature labels. Superbly produced with more than 90 color maps and hundreds of illuminating color photos throughout, this user-friendly atlas provides everyone from the devoted connoisseur to the armchair enthusiast with a thorough understanding of why Australia is rapidly becoming one of the world's top wine regions. Australian wines are known not only for their quality but also for their unequalled, rainbowlike spectrum of styles. With a career that spans over forty years, the author is a consummate authority on every aspect of the wine industry, from the planting and pruning of vines through the creation and marketing of the finished product. His passion for his subject is evident and his insights brilliantly demonstrate how variety, climate, terroir, and technology have combined to produce superb wines that are just beginning to make their mark on the world. Copub: Hardie Grant Books

A Companion to Heritage Studies

Author : William Logan
File Size : 38.62 MB
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A Companion to Heritage Studies is a comprehensive, state-of-the-art survey of the interdisciplinary study of cultural heritage. Outlines the key themes of research, including cultural preservation, environmental protection, world heritage and tourism, ethics, and human rights Accessibly organized into a substantial framework-setting essay by the editors followed by three sections on expanding, using and abusing, and recasting heritage Provides a cutting-edge guide to emerging trends in the field that is that is global in scope, cross-cultural in focus and critical in approach Features contributions from an international array of scholars, including some with extensive experience in heritage practice through UNESCO World Heritage Centre, ICOMOS, and national heritage systems