Search results for: studies-in-the-literary-imagination

Studies in the Literary Imagination

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Studies in the Literary Imagination

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The Literary Imagination

Author : Derek Traversi
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The essays collected in this book include two each on Dante and Chaucer that appear for the first time in print and three on Shakespeare that are based on Dr. Traversi's Approach to Shakespeare. Dante's Purgatorio, Chaucer's the Franklin's Tale, and Shakespeare's the Tempest are among the texts analyzed here.

Studies in the Literary Imagination

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Time the City and the Literary Imagination

Author : Anne-Marie Evans
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Time, the City, and the Literary Imagination explores the relationship between the constructions and representations of the relationship between time and the city in literature published between the late eighteenth century and the present. This collection offers a new way of reading the literary city by tracing the ways in which the relationship between time and urban space can shape literary narratives and forms. The essays consider the representation of a range of literary cities from across the world and consider how an understanding of time, and time passing, can impact on our understanding of the primary texts. Literature necessarily deals with time, both as a function of storytelling and as an experience of reading. In this volume, the contributions demonstrate how literature about cities brings to the forefront the relationship between individual and communal experience and time.

Studies in the Literary Imagination

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New York and the Literary Imagination

Author : Edward Margolies
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This work reveals the myths of New York and the various, often paradoxical ways that authors have portrayed New York City. Part One examines New York from the perspectives of a New York aristocracy (e.g. Henry James), immigrants (e.g. Mario Puzo), African Americans (e.g. Ralph Ellison), and Jews (e.g. Daniel Fuchs). Part Two studies variations and themes of New York mythology in the works of Stephen Crane, Tom Wolfe, F. Scott Fitzgerald, and Theodore Dreiser, among others. Part Three covers New York in theatre, including works from Eugene O’Neill and Arthur Miller.

Studies in the Literary Imagination

Author : Georgia state university. Department of English
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Studies in the Literary Imagination

Author : Georgia state university. Department of English
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Breeding and Eugenics in the American Literary Imagination

Author : Ewa Barbara Luczak
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A disturbing but ultimately discredited strain in American thought, eugenics was a crucial ideological force in the early twentieth century. Luczak investigates the work of writers like Jack London and Charlotte Perkins Gilman, to consider the impact of eugenic racial discourse on American literary production from 1900-1940.

The Image of the Shtetl and Other Studies of Modern Jewish Literary Imagination

Author : Dan Miron
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This volume - a sequel to the author's A traveler disguised - further develops the analysis of the fictionality and aesthetic autonomy of the classics of Yiddish fiction. The essays in this work concentrate on the artistic reconstruction of the world.

Fear in the Medical and Literary Imagination Medieval to Modern

Author : Daniel McCann
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This book is about an emotion constantly present in human culture and history: fear. It is also a book about literature and medicine, two areas of human endeavour that engage with fear most acutely. The essays in this volume explore fear in various literary and medical manifestations, in the Western World, from medieval to modern times. It is divided into two parts. The first part, Treating Fear, examines fear in medical history, and draws from theology, medicine, philosophy, and psychology, to offer an account of how fear shifts in Western understanding from the Middle Ages to Modern times. The second part, Writing Fear, explores fear as a rhetorical and literary force, offering an account of how it is used and evoked in distinct literary periods and texts. This coherent and fascinating collection will appeal to medical historians, literary critics, cultural theorists, medical humanities’ scholars and historians of the emotions.

Tuberculosis and the Victorian Literary Imagination

Author : Katherine Byrne
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Tuberculosis was a widespread and deadly disease which devastated the British population in the nineteenth-century: consequently it also had a huge impact upon public consciousness. This text explores the representations of tuberculosis in nineteenth-century literature and culture. Fears about gender roles, degeneration, national efficiency and sexual transgression all play their part in the portrayal of 'consumption', a disease which encompassed a variety of cultural associations. Through an examination of a range of Victorian texts, from well-known and popular novels by Charles Dickens and Elizabeth Gaskell to critically neglected works by Mrs Humphry Ward and Charles Reade, this work reveals the metaphors of illness which surrounded tuberculosis and the ways those metaphors were used in the fiction of the day. The book also contains detailed analysis of the substantial body of writing by nineteenth-century physicians which exists about this disease, and examines the complex relationship between medical 'fact' and literary fiction.

The Gothic Other

Author : Ruth Bienstock Anolik
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The literary use of the Gothic is marked by an anxious encounter with otherness, with the dark and mysterious unknown. From its earliest manifestations in the turbulent eighteenth century, this escapist mode has provided for authors a useful ground upon which to safely confront very real fears and horrors. The essays here examine texts in which Gothic fear is relocated onto the figure of the racial and social Other - the Other who replaces the monster as the code for mystery and danger, the horrifying and the unknowable. The essays reveal that writers from many cannons and cultures are attracted to the Gothic as a ready medium for the expression of racial and social anxieties. The essays are grouped under such topics as race, religion, class, and centers of power.

The Future of Environmental Criticism

Author : Lawrence Buell
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Written by one of the world’s leading theorists in ecocriticism, this manifesto provides a critical summary of the ecocritical movement. A critical summary of the emerging discipline of “ecocriticism”. Written by one of the world’s leading theorists in ecocriticism. Traces the history of the ecocritical movement from its roots in the 1970s through to its diversification and proliferation today. Takes account of different ecocritical positions and directions. Describes major tensions within ecocriticism and addresses major criticisms of the movement. Looks to the future of ecocriticism, proposing that discourses of the environment should become a permanent part of literary and cultural studies.

The Literary Imagination and the Study of Society

Author : Richard Hoggart
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The Chican Literary Imagination

Author : Francisco A. Lomelí
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Philosophy Dreaming and the Literary Imagination

Author : Michaela Schrage-Früh
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This book explores the intersections between dreaming and the literary imagination, in light of the findings of recent neurocognitive and empirical research, with the aim to lay a groundwork for an empirically informed aesthetics of dreaming. Drawing on perspectives from literary theory, philosophy of mind and dream research, this study investigates dreaming in relation to creativity and waking states of imagination such as writing and reading stories. Exploring the similarities and differences between the 'language' of dreams and the language of literature, it analyses the strategies employed by writers to create a sense of dream in literary fiction as well as the genres most conducive to this endeavour. The book closes with three case studies focusing on texts by Kazuo Ishiguro, Clare Boylan and John Banville to illustrate the diverse ways in which writers achieve to 'translate' the experience and 'language' of the dream.

Geography and the Literary Imagination in Victorian Fictions of Empire

Author : Jean Fernandez
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In this pioneering study, Dr. Fernandez explores how the rise of institutional geography in Victorian England impacted imperial fiction’s emergence as a genre characterized by a preoccupation with space and place. This volume argues that the alliance between institutional geography and the British empire which commenced with the founding of the Royal Geographical Society in 1830, shaped the spatial imagination of Victorians, with profound consequences for the novel of empire. Geography and the Literary Imagination in Victorian Fictions of Empire examines Presidential Addresses and reports of the Royal Geographical Society, and demonstrates how geographical studies by explorers, cartographers, ethnologists, medical topographers, administrators, and missionaries published by the RGS, local geographical societies, or the colonial state, acquired relevance for Victorian fiction’s response to the British Empire. Through a series of illuminating readings of literary works by R.L. Stevenson, Olive Schreiner, Flora Annie Steel, Winwood Reade, Joseph Conrad, and Rudyard Kipling, the study demonstrates how nineteenth-century fiction, published between 1870 and 1901, reflected and interrogated geographical discourses of the time. The study makes the case for the significance of physical and human geography for literary studies, and the unique historical and aesthetic insights gained through this approach.

Reconfiguring Citizenship and National Identity in the North American Literary Imagination

Author : Kathy-Ann Tan
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Literature has always played a central role in creating and disseminating culturally specific notions of citizenship, nationhood, and belonging. In Reconfiguring Citizenship and National Identity in the North American Literary Imagination, author Kathy-Ann Tan investigates metaphors, configurations, parameters, and articulations of U.S. and Canadian citizenship that are enacted, renegotiated, and revised in modern literary texts, particularly during periods of emergence and crisis. Tan brings together for the first time a selection of canonical and lesser-known U.S. and Canadian writings for critical consideration. She begins by exploring literary depiction of “willful” or “wayward” citizens and those with precarious bodies that are viewed as threatening, undesirable, unacceptable—including refugees and asylum seekers, undocumented migrants, deportees, and stateless people. She also considers the rights to citizenship and political membership claimed by queer bodies and an examination of "new" and alternative forms of citizenship, such as denizenship, urban citizenship, diasporic citizenship, and Indigenous citizenship. With case studies based on works by a diverse collection of authors—including Nathaniel Hawthorne, Djuna Barnes, Etel Adnan, Sarah Schulman, Walt Whitman, Gail Scott, and Philip Roth—Tan uncovers alternative forms of collectivity, community, and nation across a broad range of perspectives. In line with recent cross-disciplinary explorations in the field, Reconfiguring Citizenship and National Identity in the North American Literary Imagination shows citizenship as less of a fixed or static legal entity and more as a set of symbolic and cultural practices. Scholars of literary studies, cultural studies, and citizenship studies will be grateful for Tan’s illuminating study.