Search results for: studies-in-rabbinic-judaism-and-early-christianity

Kaiphas

Author : Dan Jaffé
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This book is dealing with the relations between the Rabbinical Judaism and the Early Christianity. It studies the continuities and the mutations and clarifies the factors of influences and the polemics between these two traditions. Ce livre s'int resse aux relations entre le juda sme rabbinique et le christianisme primitif. Il tudie les continuit s et les ruptures et clarifie les facteurs d'influences et les pol miques entre les deux traditions.

Studies in Jewish and Christian History 2 vols

Author : Elias J. Bickerman
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The publication of this new edition of Elias Bickerman's acclaimed Studies in Jewish and Christian History along with his famous book, The God of the Maccabees, brings Bickerman's central studies on ancient Judaism and early Christianity to a new generation of students and scholars.

Studies in Rabbinic Judaism and Early Christianity

Author : Dan Jaffé
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This book is dealing with the relations between the Rabbinical Judaism and the Early Christianity. It studies the continuities and the mutations and clarifies the factors of influences and the polemics between these two traditions. Ce livre s'intéresse aux relations entre le judaïsme rabbinique et le christianisme primitif. Il étudie les continuités et les ruptures et clarifie les facteurs d'influences et les polémiques entre les deux traditions.

Studies in Jewish and Christian History

Author : Elias Joseph Bickerman
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"Elias J. Bickerman, who passed away a quarter of a century ago, was one of the twentieth century's great historians of the ancient world. His innovative genius and breathtaking erudition are evident in his writings, many of which are now considered classics. Bickerman's contributions to the history of anicent Judaism and early Christianity remain particularly significant but his three volume collection, 'Studies in Jewish and Christian History', has been out of print for some time. Thus, the publication of this new edition of 'Studies', now entirely in English, along with Bickerman's most famous book, 'The God of the Maccabees', is designed to bring Bickerman's central studies on ancient Judaism and early Christianity to a new generation of students and scholars."--taken from back cover.

Studies in Jewish and Christian History

Author : Elias Joseph Bickerman
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The publication of this new edition of Elias Bickerman's acclaimed Studies in Jewish and Christian History along with his famous book, The God of the Maccabees, brings Bickerman's central studies on ancient Judaism and early Christianity to a new generation of students and scholars.

Memory and Identity in Ancient Judaism and Early Christianity

Author : Tom Thatcher
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Essential reading for scholars and students interested in sociology and biblical studies In this collection scholars of biblical texts and rabbinics engage the work of Barry Schwartz, Professor Emeritus in the Department of Sociology at the University of Georgia. Schwartz provides an introductory essay on the study of collective memory. Articles that follow integrate his work into the study of early Jewish and Christian texts. The volume concludes with a response from Schwartz that continues this warm and fruitful dialogue between fields. Features: Articles that integrate the study of collective memory and social psychology into religious studies Essays from Barry Schwartz Theories applied rather than left as abstract principles

The Jewish Apocalyptic Heritage in Early Christianity

Author : James C. VanderKam
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This volume contains five chapters which investigate the early Christian appropriations of Jewish apocalyptic material. An introductory chapter surveys ancient perceptions of the apocalyses as well as their function, authority, and survival in the early Church. The second chapter focuses on a specific tradition by exploring the status of the Enoch-literature, the use of the fallen-angel motif, and the identification of Enoch as an eschatological witness. Christian transmission of Jewish texts, a topic whose significance is more and more being recognized, is the subject of chapter three which analyzes what happend to 4,5 and 6 Ezra as they were copied and edited in Christian circles. Chapter four studies the early Christian appropriation and reinterpretation of Jewish apocalyptic chronologies, especially Daniel's vision of 70 weeks. The fifth and last chapter is devoted to the use and influence of Jewish apocalyptic traditions among Christian sectarian groups in Asia Minor and particularly in Egypt. Taken together these chapters written by four authors, offer illuminating examples of how Jewish apocalyptic texts and traditions fared in early Christianity. Editors James C. VanderKam is lecturing at the University of Notre Dame; William Adler is lecturer at North Carolina State University. Series: Compendia Rerum Iudaicarum ad Novum Testamentum Section 1 - The Jewish people in the first century Historial geography, political history, social, cultural and religious life and institutions Edited by S. Safrai and M. Stern in cooperation with D. Flusser and W.C. van Unnik Section 2 - The Literature of the Jewish People in the Period of the Second Temple and the Talmud Section 3 - Jewish Traditions in Early Christian Literature

Calendar Chronology and Worship

Author : Roger T. Beckwith
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This is a wide-ranging book, dealing with many topics of current interest in relation to the Dead Sea Scrolls, early Jewish and Christian Worship and their links, the religious Calendar, ancient Chronology, the Old Testament Psalter and New Testament eschatology.

Early Rabbinic Judaism

Author : Jacob Neusner
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Studies in Jewish and Christian History

Author : Elias J. Bickerman
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How Jesus Became Christian

Author : Barrie Wilson
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How the early Christians rewrote history, turning a Jewish teacher and messiah into a 'Christian' man-deity, bringing eternal life to all who believe We often forget the undeniable fact that Jesus was Jewish. He lived and died a Jew, teaching the religion of his forbears and living by the Torah. After his death there was a 'Jesus movement' led by Jesus' brother James in Jerusalem and a 'Christ movement' led by Paul (who never met Jesus) in the Diaspora. The Christ movement deliberately sought to replace and destroy the Jesus movement. The battles of the Jewish community against the Romans, and the chaos after the destruction of the Temple in Jerusalem in AD 70, helped Paul and his party to seduce Jesus' followers away from the strictures of Judaism. Having killed off the historical Jesus, the new Christians turned the religion away from a traditional emphasis on behaviour into the most successful personality cult in recorded history.

The Temple in Early Christianity

Author : Eyal Regev
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A comprehensive treatment of the early Christian approaches to the Temple and its role in shaping Jewish and Christian identity The first scholarly work to trace the Temple throughout the entire New Testament, this study examines Jewish and Christian attitudes toward the Temple in the first century and provides both Jews and Christians with a better understanding of their respective faiths and how they grow out of this ancient institution. The centrality of the Temple in New Testament writing reveals the authors’ negotiations with the institutional and symbolic center of Judaism as they worked to form their own religion.

Covenant of Blood

Author : Lawrence A. Hoffman
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Central to both biblical narrative and rabbinic commentary, circumcision has remained a defining rite of Jewish identity, a symbol so powerful that challenges to it have always been considered taboo. Lawrence Hoffman seeks to find out why circumcision holds such an important place in the Jewish psyche. He traces the symbolism of circumcision through Jewish history, examining its evolution as a symbol of the covenant in the post-exilic period of the Bible and its subsequent meaning in the formative era of Mishnah and Talmud. In the rabbinic system, Hoffman argues, circumcision was neither a birth ritual nor the beginning of the human life cycle, but a rite of covenantal initiation into a male "life line." Although the evolution of the rite was shaped by rabbinic debates with early Christianity, the Rabbis shared with the church a view of blood as providing salvation. Hoffman examines the particular significance of circumcision blood, which, in addition to its salvific role, contrasted with menstrual blood to symbolize the gender dichotomy within the rabbinic system. His analysis of the Rabbis' views of circumcision and menstrual blood sheds light on the marginalization of women in rabbinic law. Differentiating official mores about gender from actual practice, Hoffman surveys women's spirituality within rabbinic society and examines the roles mothers played in their sons' circumcisions until the medieval period, when they were finally excluded.

First Century Palestinian Judaism

Author : David Ray Bourquin
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Jesus was a Jew. That simple statement carries with it a millennia of cultural bias, persecution, and ignorance. David Ray Bourquin attempts to shed some light on what it meant to be a Jew during the Roman Period with this detailed, annotated bibliography of works in English. Following a brief introduction and guide on how to use the book, Bourquin divides his work into three major sections: A. Primary Sources; B. Books; and C. Periodical and Serial Articles. In each section, materials are arranged by subject, and in each sub-section in alphabetical order by main entry. Entries include complete bibliographical data, plus concise, descriptive, and analytical annotations. A glossary and four detailed indexes, all correlated to entry numbers, complete the volume. Every student of the period will want a copy of this carefully compiled bibliography.

Forgotten Origins

Author : Juan Marcos Gutierrez
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Many years ago, in a lecture on the creation of the Mishnah, the Orthodox Jewish historian, Rabbi Berel Wein discussed the rise of early Christianity as a historical and theological backdrop. He mentioned that this era is of particular importance to Jews because of the complicated and tragic relationship between Jews and Christians over the centuries. He referred to Joseph Klausner, the famed Jewish professor of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem who in the earlier part of the 20th century, had authored several works on early Christianity from a Jewish standpoint. The first was titled Jesus of Nazareth. The second was titled From Jesus to Paul. Rabbi Wein considered both books to be exemplary works on the subject. He noted, disappointingly, however, that at the time, most Christians were not interested in reading the Jewish perspectives of Joseph Klausner. Jews, he observed, were not that fascinated by the subject either. Things have changed considerably, however, and the historical relationship between Judaism and Christianity is of increasing importance for both contemporary communities. Even in discussing Jewish Law, as Rabbi Wein noted, the subject of Christianity is not far away in significance. Similarly, for Christians, there is probably not a weekly service that goes by without Israel or the Jewish people being mentioned in some form or fashion.The process of reflection has not been an easy one. Since the third and fourth centuries, the worlds of Judaism and Christianity have increasingly crystallized to such a level of distinction obscuring their shared history and theology. Consequently, people legitimately ask what connections between Judaism and Christianity exist. That was not always the case, and early Christians, as well as Jews, were cognizant of the ties that existed. In past centuries the connections were usually the source of bitter polemics between the two communities. Each community saw itself as the legitimate representative of biblical faith to the exclusion of the other. The relationships deteriorated steadily over time.Rabbi Byron Sherwin of blessed memory, in a lecture at the Spertus Institute of Jewish Learning and Leadership and in his book Studies in Jewish Theology, noted what he believed to be the great enigma of Christianity. He believed like the medieval and early modern rabbis, Rabbi Menahem Ha-Meiri, Rabbi Abraham Farisol, Rabbi Moses Rivkes, Rabbi Leon de Modena, and Rabbi Jacob Emden and others that Christianity had transformed many non-Jews from paganism to the knowledge of the God of Israel. This was not an endorsement of Christianity for Jews, but recognition of its positive effects for non-Jews.Almost simultaneously, however, the nascent Christian movement also promoted anti-Judaism and then anti-Semitism. Rabbi Berel Wein, in his lecture on the Oral Law, speculated whether significant Jewish opposition to the early followers of Jesus resulted in long-term and negative recollections that became embedded in later Christianity. If that was the case, the ferocity of the Christian reply was ultimately unequaled and repaid Jewish rejection many times over.To discover the forgotten Jewish origins of early Christianity, a series of chapters will lay out the case for the continued Jewish distinctiveness of the early Christian movement composed of Jews in the first century and beyond. Their Jewish identity lay along a wide-ranging continuum. Other sections will also examine those who departed or deviated from these views.

Jews and Christians in Antiquity

Author : P. Lanfranchi
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This volume brings together a selection of papers presented at two conferences on Jewish-Christian interaction in Antiquity held in Leuven and Aix-en-Provence in 2013 and 2014. It aims to introduce a different approach to this crucial topic and some new issues following from this. Specialists of Ancient Judaism, Early Christianity, Patristics, Late Antiquity, Rabbinic Studies, Papyrology, Epigraphy, Hagiography, and Gnosticism have focused on such topics as the consequences of the Jewish wars for the relations between Jews and Christians in Palestina, the cultural and religious exchange between the two communities in Alexandria, Smyrna, Syria, the Jewish-Christian polemics in Rabbinic literature, the papyrological and epigraphic evidences of the Jewish and Christian presence in Egypt and Rome, the coexistence of Jews and Christians in Northern Italy, Hispania, North Africa, Gaul, etc. The papers are arranged chronologically (from the 1st to the 7th century CE) as well as geographically (the Eastern and Western part of the Roman Empire). The volume offers both "general surveys" and "case studies", each of them exploring different aspects of Jewish-Christian interaction.

In the Shadow of the Temple

Author : Oskar Skarsaune
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Oskar Skarsaune gives us a new look into the development of the early church and its practice by showing us the evidence of interaction between the early Christians and rabbinic Judaism. He offers numerous fascinating episodes and glimpses into this untold story.

Classical Christianity and Rabbinic Judaism

Author : Bruce D. Chilton
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Among the world's religions, Christianity and Judaism are the most symmetrical. But in our day of religious tolerance, a tendency to overlook the vital differences between the two religions in the name of good will can undermine constructive Jewish-Christian dialogue. In this book, Bruce D. Chilton describes early Christian thought and Jacob Neusner describes early Judaic thought on fundamental issues such as creation and human nature, Christ and Torah, sin and atonement, and eschatology. At the end of each chapter, each assesses the other's perspective, and a final chapter explains why the authors believe theological confrontation--not just comparison--defines the task of interfaith dialogue today.

The Evil Inclination in Early Judaism and Christianity

Author : Ishay Rosen-Zvi
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One of the central concepts in rabbinic Judaism is the notion of the Evil Inclination, which appears to be related to similar concepts in ancient Christianity and the wider late antique world. The precise origins and understanding of the idea, however, are unknown. This volume traces the development of this concept historically in Judaism and assesses its impact on emerging Christian thought concerning the origins of sin. The chapters, which cover a wide range of sources including the Bible, the Ancient Versions, Qumran, Pseudepigrapha and Apocrypha, the Targums, and rabbinic and patristic literature, advance our understanding of the intellectual exchange between Jews and Christians in classical Antiquity, as well as the intercultural exchange between these communities and the societies in which they were situated.

Maimonides s Yahweh

Author : Amy Karen Downey
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The life of Moshe ben Maimon (Maimonides) remains a mystery to many within evangelical Christianity. However, he is lauded as a second Moses by many within modern Judaism. Does he deserve that title? Maimonides's via negativa created a rationale for rejecting the messiahship claims of Jesus in Rabbinic Judaism. Therefore, this book seeks to illustrate that Maimonides, in his desire to create an anti-Christian apologetic regarding the incarnation, fashioned a Judaism that does not reflect the truths of the Tanakh (Old Testament) and developed a Judaism that was untenable for the Jewish people of the twenty-first century. Many Jewish people today are turning in a thousand and one different directions for spiritual answers, but not in the only way that will offer the way to God: Jesus of Nazareth (John 14:6). This work examines the history of Maimonides, his teachings, and an apologetic approach to bring the gospel back to the Jewish people (Rom 1:16).