Search results for: space-hope-and-brutalism

Space Hope and Brutalism

Author : Elain Harwood
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This is the first major book to study English architecture between 1945 and 1975 in its entirety. Challenging previous scholarship on the subject and uncovering vast amounts of new material at the boundaries between architectural and social history, Elain Harwood structures the book around building types to reveal why the architecture takes the form it does. Buildings of all budgets and styles are examined, from major universities to the modest café. The book is illustrated with stunning new photography that reveals the logic, aspirations, and beauty of hundreds of buildings throughout England, at the point where many are disappearing or are being mutilated. Space, Hope, and Brutalism offers a convincing and lively overview of a subject and period that fascinates younger scholars and appeals to those who were witnesses to this history.

Brutalism

Author : Billy Reading
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No style has divided opinion more than brutalism. But now, fifty years since the heyday of the style, Brutalist buildings are more popular than they have ever been. This is the perfect introduction to Britain’s Brutalist monuments.

Brutalism Resurgent

Author : Julia Gatley
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Brutalism had its origins in béton brut – concrete in the raw – and thus in the post-war work of Le Corbusier. The British architects Alison and Peter Smithson used the term "New Brutalism" from 1953, claiming that if their house in Soho had been built, "it would have been the first exponent of the ‘New Brutalism’ in England". Reyner Banham famously gave the movement a series of characteristics, including the clear expression of a building’s structure and services, and the honest use of materials in their "as-found" condition. The Smithsons and Banham promoted the New Brutalism as ethic rather than aesthetic, privileging truth to structure, materials and services and the gritty reality of the working classes over the concerns of the bourgeoisie. But Brutalist architecture changed as it was taken up by others, giving rise to more sculptural buildings flaunting their raw materials, including off-form concrete, often in conjunction with bold structural members. While Brutalism fell out of vogue in the 1980s, recent years have seen renewed admiration for it. This volume is consistent with this broader resurgence, presenting new scholarship on Brutalist architects and projects from Skopje to Sydney, and from Harvard to Haringey. It will appeal to readers interested in twentieth-century architecture, and modern and post-war heritage. This book was originally published as a special issue of Fabrications: the Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians, Australia and New Zealand.

How to Love Brutalism

Author : John Grindrod
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John Grindrod is passionate about buildings and how they shape our lives. He grew up on 'the last road in London' on Croydon's New Addington housing estate, surrounded by the Green Belt. He is the author of

Thatcher s Progress

Author : Guy Ortolano
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Examines a pioneering programme of urban development to rewrite the history of Britain's transition from social democracy to neoliberalism.

Libraries of Light

Author : Alistair Black
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For the first hundred years or so of their history, public libraries in Britain were built in an array of revivalist architectural styles. This backward-looking tradition was decisively broken in the 1960s as many new libraries were erected up and down the country. In this new Routledge book, Alistair Black argues that the architectural modernism of the post-war years was symptomatic of the age’s spirit of renewal. In the 1960s, public libraries truly became ‘libraries of light’, and Black further explains how this phrase not only describes the shining new library designs – with their open-plan, decluttered, Scandinavian-inspired designs – but also serves as a metaphor for the public library’s role as a beacon of social egalitarianism and cultural universalism. A sequel to Books, Buildings and Social Engineering (2009), Black's new book takes his fascinating story of the design of British public libraries into the era of architectural modernism.

Art Deco Britain

Author : Elain Harwood
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The definitive guide to Art Deco buildings in Britain. The perennially popular style of Art Deco influenced architecture and design all over the world in the 1920s and 1930s from elegant Parisian theatres to glamorous Manhattan skyscrapers. The style was also adopted by British architects, but, until now, there has been little that really explains the what, where and how of Art Deco buildings in Britain. In Art Deco Britain, leading architecture historian and writer Elain Harwood, brings her trademark clarity and enthusiasm to the subject as she explores Britain's Art Deco buildings. Art Deco Britain, published in association with the Twentieth Century Society, is the definitive guide to the architectural style in Britain. The book begins with an overview of the international Art Deco style, and how this influenced building design in Britain. The buildings covered include Houses and Flats; Churches and Public Buildings; Offices; Shops, Showrooms and Cafés; Hotels and Public Houses; Cinemas, Theatres and Concert Halls; Sports Buildings; Industrial Premises and Transport Buildings.

Post Modern Buildings in Britain

Author : Geraint Franklin
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An illuminating look at a controversial architectural style – and its finest examples Post-modernism was the 1980s’ counter to Brutalism but fell out of fashion until its best buildings began to disappear. Now is the time to reassess its values. Historians Geraint Franklin and Elain Harwood discuss its background and key architects before celebrating Britain's finest examples. Individual entries are beautifully illustrated, many with new photography, including the SIS Building made famous by James Bond, John Outram’s awe-inspiring pumping station in London's Docklands and Judge Institute in Cambridge, and the late works of James Stirling and Michael Wilford, including No.1 Poultry – an extraordinary corner of the City that in 2016 became England’s youngest listed building.

England s Post War Listed Buildings

Author : Elain Harwood
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England's Post-War Listed Buildings is a comprehensive and stylish guide to over 500 of the country's most striking and historically relevant architectural gems, from private houses to schools, churches, military buildings, monuments and parks. Listed buildings include traditional works by Raymond Erith and Donald McMorran and many of the 'pop icons' of the 1960s (including Centre Point). Also featured are internationally outstanding modern works like Stirling and Gowan's Leicester Engineering Building and Foster Associates' offices for Willis Faber Dumas in Ipswich. This fully updated and expanded edition contains numerous new entries arranged in an accessible, regional structure, as well as features on telephone boxes, landscapes, memorials and sculptures. Each entry is illustrated with photographs and includes information on architect, date of construction and listing grade date, as well as a detailed description of the site and what makes it unique.

Eric Lyons Span

Author : Barbara Simms
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This book is about the architect Eric Lyons and his main client Span Developments.

Cities of Hope

Author : Conrad Hamann
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'the architecture of Edmond and Corrigan is the appropriate self-defining aesthetic alternative to the Club of Europe.' This is how French critic Pierre Restany describes the Australian architectural practice of Maggie Edmond and Peter Corrigan.Writing in the Milan journal Domus, the New York architecture critic, Kenneth Frampton, wrote at length on the aesthetics of the coming decade and significance of 'edge' or 'regional centres'. 'Living and creating in today's international cities', he argued, 'precludes an opportunity for pause orintrospection. Profound examination of cultural issues now occurs outside the traditional intellectual centres. The great cities of our time are simply unable to provide the ambience for new thought'. He then cited four cities: Toronto, Glasgow, Madrid and Melbourne as prototypes and harbours forcentres of new thought.In architecture and theatre, the firm of Edmond and Corrigan Pty Ltd has practised its own form of regional art for twenty years in Melbourne. The firm has been invited to exhibit at the Paris Biennale 1982, Harvard University 1984, the Venice Biennale 1991 and the Belgrade Triennial 1991. Theirwork has been widely published in Italy, Britain, Denmark, Japan, Yugoslavia and the United States. Dr Corrigan was Guest Professor at Harvard University in 1984 and Turin Polytechnic in 1991.For the past twenty years, Edmond and Corrigan's work has drawn an intense reaction and interest that only has an Australian counterpart in the reception of Walter Burley Griffin in the 1920s. Their work is a search for the means to express ideas about life in Australia through the medium of builtform. "Modest means, pedestrian imagery and bush details are employed in an attempt to make public statements within tight budgets.' (Peter Corrigan) The buildings designed by Edmond and Corrigan are discussed within the context of Australian and international architecture.Sustained critiques that venture beyond the descriptive are rare in Australian architecture. Conrad Hamann has started to redress the balance in this lively, original and well-informed analysis.

Arts Architecture

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Country Life

Author :
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Annual Report

Author : University of London. Institute of Advanced Legal Studies
File Size : 87.5 MB
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Library Journal

Author :
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The City as a Stage

Author : Kevin W. Green
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New Statesman

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The Fontana Dictionary of Modern Thought

Author : Alan Bullock
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More discursive than an ordinary dictionary, more compact than an encyclopaedia, more selective than either, this reference book contains some 4000 entires covering the whole range of twentieth century thought in the humanities and sciences.

The Harper Dictionary of Modern Thought

Author : Alan Bullock
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The Spectator

Author :
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