Search results for: quakers-in-the-colonial-northeast

Quakers in the Colonial Northeast

Author : Arthur J. Worrall
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Traces the Quaker experience in New England and New York from the arrival of the first English Quaker missionaries in 1656 to 1790.

Quakers in the Colonial Northeast

Author : Arthur J. Worrall
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Quakers and Baptists in Colonial Massachusetts

Author : Carla Gardina Pestana
File Size : 35.86 MB
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A comparative study of the Quaker meeting in Salem and the Baptist church in Boston.

Quaker Crosscurrents

Author : Hugh Barbour
File Size : 33.33 MB
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Early New England

Author : David A. Weir
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The idea of covenant was at the heart of early New England society. In this singular book David Weir explores the origins and development of covenant thought in America by analyzing the town and church documents written and signed by seventeenth-century New Englanders. Unmatched in the breadth of its scope, this study takes into account all of the surviving covenants in all of the New England colonies. Weir's comprehensive survey of seventeenth-century covenants leads to a more complex picture of early New England than what emerges from looking at only a few famous civil covenants like the Mayflower Compact. His work shows covenant theology being transformed into a covenantal vision for society but also reveals the stress and strains on church-state relationships that eventually led to more secularized colonial governments in eighteenth-century New England. He concludes that New England colonial society was much more "English" and much less "American" than has often been thought, and that the New England colonies substantially mirrored religious and social change in Old England.

Cape Cod and Plymouth Colony in the Seventeenth Century

Author : H. Roger King
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This book examines the contribution of Cape Cod to the transformation of the Pilgrims' Plymouth into a mature colony. The author covers the exploration of the region as well as the early travels to the Cape before its settlement, explaining the eventual significance of individual towns like Sandwich, which became the colony's center of Quakerism. Politically, Cape towns forced the colony to adopt a representative legislature and economically, the Cape provided acreage for farming and sites for additional towns. King also examines why, despite the expansion and the growth, Plymouth still remained a poor and underpopulated colony. This book stands alone as the only study of the entire Cape to be published in this century.

The Quakers in America

Author : Thomas D. Hamm
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The Quakers in America is a multifaceted history of the Religious Society of Friends and a fascinating study of its culture and controversies today. Lively vignettes of Conservative, Evangelical, Friends General Conference, and Friends United meetings illuminate basic Quaker theology and reflect the group's diversity while also highlighting the fundamental unity within the religion. Quaker culture encompasses a rich tradition of practice even as believers continue to debate whether Quakerism is necessarily Christian, where religious authority should reside, how one transmits faith to children, and how gender and sexuality shape religious belief and behavior. Praised for its rich insight and wide-ranging perspective, The Quakers in America is a penetrating account of an influential, vibrant, and often misunderstood religious sect. Known best for their long-standing commitment to social activism, pacifism, fair treatment for Native Americans, and equality for women, the Quakers have influenced American thought and society far out of proportion to their relatively small numbers. Whether in the foreign policy arena (the American Friends Service Committee), in education (the Friends schools), or in the arts (prominent Quakers profiled in this book include James Turrell, Bonnie Raitt, and James Michener), Quakers have left a lasting imprint on American life. This multifaceted book is a concise history of the Religious Society of Friends; an introduction to its beliefs and practices; and a vivid picture of the culture and controversies of the Friends today. The book opens with lively vignettes of Conservative, Evangelical, Friends General Conference, and Friends United meetings that illuminate basic Quaker concepts and theology and reflect the group's diversity in the wake of the sectarian splintering of the nineteenth century. Yet the book also examines commonalities among American Friends that demonstrate a fundamental unity within the religion: their commitments to worship, the ministry of all believers, decision making based on seeking spiritual consensus rather than voting, a simple lifestyle, and education. Thomas Hamm shows that Quaker culture encompasses a rich tradition of practice even as believers continue to debate a number of central questions: Is Quakerism necessarily Christian? Where should religious authority reside? Is the self sacred? How does one transmit faith to children? How do gender and sexuality shape religious belief and behavior? Hamm's analysis of these debates reveals a vital religion that prizes both unity and diversity.

The Quakers 1656 1723

Author : Richard C. Allen
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This landmark volume is the first in a century to examine the “Second Period” of Quakerism, a time when the Religious Society of Friends experienced upheavals in theology, authority and institutional structures, and political trajectories as a result of the persecution Quakers faced in the first decades of the movement’s existence. The authors and special contributors explore the early growth of Quakerism, assess important developments in Quaker faith and practice, and show how Friends coped with the challenges posed by external and internal threats in the final years of the Stuart age—not only in Europe and North America but also in locations such as the Caribbean. This groundbreaking collection sheds new light on a range of subjects, including the often tense relations between Quakers and the authorities, the role of female Friends during the Second Period, the effect of major industrial development on Quakerism, and comparisons between founder George Fox and the younger generation of Quakers, such as Robert Barclay, George Keith, and William Penn. Accessible, well-researched, and seamlessly comprehensive, The Quakers, 1656–1723 promises to reinvigorate a conversation largely ignored by scholarship over the last century and to become the definitive work on this important era in Quaker history. In addition to the authors, the contributors are Erin Bell, Raymond Brown, J. William Frost, Emma Lapsansky-Werner, Robynne Rogers Healey, Alan P. F. Sell, and George Southcombe.

The Early English Caribbean 1570 1700 Vol 4

Author : Carla Gardina Pestana
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This four-volume collection brings together rare pamphlets from the formative years of the English involvement in the Caribbean. Texts presented in the volumes cover the first impressions of the region, imperial rivalries between European traders and settlers and the experience of day-to-day life in the colonies. Volume 4: Making Meaning The flora and fauna of the islands and their economic potential was documented in a number of tracts which also helped to promote the colony as an attractive and bountiful place to settle. Running counter to the promotional literature was a whole sub-genre on natural disasters. Hurricanes and earthquakes were relatively common, and the commentators who wrote about them did so from a variety of motives: to entertain, to shock, to warn or simply to record them. Often portrayed as irreligious, settlers engaged energetically in the religious debates of the time. Dissenters were encouraged or coerced into leaving for the colonies and a number of Quaker publications condemned the transportation of their coreligionists. Though most settlers were members of the Church of England, its textual footprint was quite small and many more dissenting tracts have survived.

The Quaker Community on Barbados

Author : Larry Dale Gragg
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