Protagoras

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Author: Plato,Michael Frede

Publisher: Hackett Publishing

ISBN: 1624666159

Category: Philosophy

Page: 112

View: 5198

Lombardo and Bell have translated this important early dialogue on virtue, wisdom, and the nature of Sophistic teaching into an idiom remarkable for its liveliness and subtlety. Michael Frede has provided a substantial introduction that illuminates the dialogue's perennial interest, its Athenian political background, and the particular difficulties and ironic nuances of its argument.

Plato’s Protagoras

Essays on the Confrontation of Philosophy and Sophistry

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Author: Olof Pettersson,Vigdis Songe-Møller

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 3319455850

Category: Philosophy

Page: 235

View: 6110

This book presents a thorough study and an up to date anthology of Plato’s Protagoras. International authors' papers contribute to the task of understanding how Plato introduced and negotiated a new type of intellectual practice – called philosophy – and the strategies that this involved. They explore Plato’s dialogue, looking at questions of how philosophy and sophistry relate, both on a methodological and on a thematic level. While many of the contributing authors argue for a sharp distinction between sophistry and philosophy, this is contested by others. Readers may consider the distinctions between philosophy and traditional forms of poetry and sophistry through these papers. Questions for readers' attention include: To what extent is Socrates’ preferred mode of discourse, and his short questions and answers, superior to Protagoras’ method of sophistic teaching? And why does Plato make Socrates and Protagoras reverse positions as it comes to virtue and its teachability? This book will appeal to graduates and researchers with an interest in the origins of philosophy, classical philosophy and historical philosophy.

Protagoras and the Challenge of Relativism

Plato's Subtlest Enemy

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Author: Ugo Zilioli

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317074475

Category: Philosophy

Page: 172

View: 8177

Protagoras was an important Greek thinker of the fifth century BC, the most famous of the so called Sophists, though most of what we know of him and his thought comes to us mainly through the dialogues of his strenuous opponent Plato. In this book, Ugo Zilioli offers a sustained and philosophically sophisticated examination of what is, in philosophical terms, the most interesting feature of Protagoras' thought for modern readers: his role as the first Western thinker to argue for relativism. Zilioli relates Protagoras' relativism with modern forms of relativism, in particular the 'robust relativism' of Joseph Margolis, gives an integrated account both of the perceptual relativism examined in Plato's Theaetetus and the ethical or social relativism presented in the first part of Plato's Protagoras and offers an integrated and positive analysis of Protagoras' thought, rather than focusing on ancient criticisms and responses to his thought. This is a deeply scholarly work which brings much argument to bear to the claim that Protagoras was and remains Plato's subtlest philosophical enemy.

Plato's Anti-hedonism and the Protagoras

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Author: J. Clerk Shaw

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1316240207

Category: Philosophy

Page: N.A

View: 9680

Plato often rejects hedonism, but in the Protagoras, Plato's Socrates seems to endorse hedonism. In this book, J. Clerk Shaw removes this apparent tension by arguing that the Protagoras as a whole actually reflects Plato's anti-hedonism. He shows that Plato places hedonism at the core of a complex of popular mistakes about value and especially about virtue: that injustice can be prudent, that wisdom is weak, that courage is the capacity to persevere through fear, and that virtue cannot be taught. The masses reproduce this system of values through shame and fear of punishment. The Protagoras and other dialogues depict sophists and orators who have internalized popular morality through shame, but who are also ashamed to state their views openly. Shaw's reading not only reconciles the Protagoras with Plato's other dialogues, but harmonizes it with them and even illuminates Plato's wider anti-hedonism.

Plato and Protagoras

Truth and Relativism in Ancient Greek Philosophy

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Author: Oded Balaban

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Philosophy

Page: 345

View: 6429

Drawing on his years of teaching the two Greek thinkers to graduate students, Balaban (philosophy, U. of Haifa) compares their thought. He explains that Plato adopts the point of the view of the content of knowledge, which can be either true or false, and insists that a criterion for determining truth is available and that salvation consists in learning it by instruction. Protagoras he describes as adopting the perspective of the form of knowledge, which is the aspect of it that is neither true nor false, and concluding that such a criterion for determining truth is not available, and therefore all we need to do is change our natural dispositions, a task he reserves for education. Annotation copyrighted by Book News, Inc., Portland, OR

Socrates and the Sophists

Plato's Protagoras, Euthydemus, Hippias and Cratylus

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Author: Plato

Publisher: Hackett Publishing

ISBN: 1585105058

Category: Philosophy

Page: 234

View: 9775

This is an English translation of four of Plato’s dialogue (Protagoras, Euthydemus, Hippias Major, and Cratylus) that explores the topic of sophistry and philosophy, a key concept at the source of Western thought. Includes notes and an introductory essay. Focus Philosophical Library translations are close to and are non-interpretative of the original text, with the notes and a glossary intending to provide the reader with some sense of the terms and the concepts as they were understood by Plato’s immediate audience.

Complete Works

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Author: Plato

Publisher: Hackett Publishing

ISBN: 9780872203495

Category: Philosophy

Page: 1808

View: 5695

Gathers translations of Plato's works and includes guidance on approaching their reading and study

Of Art and Wisdom

Plato's Understanding of Techne

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Author: David Roochnik

Publisher: Penn State University Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: Philosophy

Page: 300

View: 4404

A comprehensive discussion of Plato's treatment of techne (technical knowledge), which shows that the final goal of Platonic philosophy is nontechnical wisdom. The Greek word "techne," typically translated as "art," but also as "craft," "skill," "expertise," "technical knowledge," and even "science," has been decisive in shaping our "technological" culture. Here David Roochnik comprehensively analyzes Plato's treatment of this crucial word. Roochnik maintains that Plato's understanding of both the goodness of techne, as well as its severe limitations and consequent need to be supplemented by "nontechnical" wisdom, can speak directly to our own concerns about the troubling impact technology has had on contemporary life. For most commentators, techne functions as a positive, theoretical model through which Plato attempts to articulate the nature of moral knowledge. Scholars such as Terence Irwin and Martha Nussbaum argue that Plato’s version of moral knowledge is structurally similar to techne. In arguing thus, they attribute to Plato what Nietzsche called "theoretical optimism," the view that technical knowledge can become an efficient panacea for the dilemmas and painful contingencies of human life. Conventional wisdom has it, in short, that for Plato technical, moral knowledge can solve life's problems. By systematically analyzing Socrates’ analogical arguments, Roochnik shows the weakness of the conventional view. The basic pattern of these arguments is this: if moral knowledge is analogous to techne, then insurmountable difficulties arise, and moral knowledge becomes impossible. Since moral knowledge is not impossible, it cannot be analogous to techne. In other words, the purpose of Socrates' analogical arguments is to reveal the limitations of techne as a model for the wisdom Socrates so ardently seeks. For all the reasons Plato is so careful to present in his dialogues, wisdom cannot be rendered technical; it cannot become techne. Thus, Roochnik concludes, Plato wrote dialogues instead of technical treatises, as they are the appropriate vehicle for his expression of nontechnical wisdom.

Books in Print

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Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: American literature

Page: N.A

View: 7011

Reading Plato's Theaetetus

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Author: Timothy D. J. Chappell

Publisher: Hackett Publishing

ISBN: 9780872207608

Category: Philosophy

Page: 246

View: 4945

Timothy Chappell's new translation of the Theaetetus is presented here in short sections of text, each preceded by a summary of the argument and followed by his philosophical commentary on it. Introductory remarks discuss Plato and his works, his use of dialogue, the structure of the Theaetetus, and alternative interpretations of the work as a whole. A glossary and bibliography are provided.