Search results for: policing-los-angeles

Policing Los Angeles

Author : Max Felker-Kantor
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When the Los Angeles neighborhood of Watts erupted in violent protest in August 1965, the uprising drew strength from decades of pent-up frustration with employment discrimination, residential segregation, and poverty. But the more immediate grievance was anger at the racist and abusive practices of the Los Angeles Police Department. Yet in the decades after Watts, the LAPD resisted all but the most limited demands for reform made by activists and residents of color, instead intensifying its power. In Policing Los Angeles, Max Felker-Kantor narrates the dynamic history of policing, anti-police abuse movements, race, and politics in Los Angeles from the 1965 Watts uprising to the 1992 Los Angeles rebellion. Using the explosions of two large-scale uprisings in Los Angeles as bookends, Felker-Kantor highlights the racism at the heart of the city's expansive police power through a range of previously unused and rare archival sources. His book is a gripping and timely account of the transformation in police power, the convergence of interests in support of law and order policies, and African American and Mexican American resistance to police violence after the Watts uprising.

Los Angeles Police Department Meltdown

Author : James Lasley
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Once considered among the most respected police departments in the world, the LAPD suffered a devastating fall from grace following the 1991 police officer beating of Rodney King and the Los Angeles riots stemming from the officers acquittal in 1992. Unique to the literature of policing, management, and policy studies, Los Angeles Police Departmen

Policing Space

Author : Steven Kelly Herbert
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Policing Space is a fascinating firsthand account of how the Los Angeles Police Department attempts to control its vast, heterogeneous territory. As such, the book offers a rare, ground-level look at the relationship between the control of space and the exercise of power. Author Steve Herbert spent eight months observing one patrol division of the LAPD on the job. A compelling story in itself, his fieldwork with the officers in the Wilshire Division affords readers a close view of the complex factors at play in how the police define and control territory, how they make and mark space. Unique in its application of fieldwork and theory to this complex subject, Policing Space should prove valuable to readers in urban and political geography, urban and political sociology, and criminology, as well as those who wonder about the workings of the LAPD.

Policing Los Angeles Under a Consent Degree

Author : Christopher Stone
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In [2000], rather than fight a federal civil rights lawsuit alleging a "pattern-and-practice" of police misconduct, the Mayor, City Council, Police Commission, and Police Department signed a "consent decree" with the U.S. Department of Justice, giving the Federal District Court jurisdiction to oversee the LAPD's adoption of a series of specific management, supervisory, and enforcement practices ... this report takes a step back for a wider look at the issues that gave rise to the consent decree in the first place. We designed our research to answer the question: How has the LAPD changed since the consent decree? We focused on the professional work of the Department, its relations with the communities it serves, and its governance ... the recent history of policing in Los Angeles demonstrates that respecting rights and reducing crime can be achieved together. Since 2003, as the police use of force declined, so did crime. As police-community relations improved, even in the poorest neighborhoods, so did public safety. The results in Los Angeles suggest that consent decrees can succeed and that the Justice Department can use its new power effectively at least in some circumstances.

The Limits of Community Policing

Author : Luis Daniel Gascón
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A critical look at the realities of community policing in South Los Angeles The Limits of Community Policing addresses conflicts between police and communities. Luis Daniel Gascón and Aaron Roussell depart from traditional conceptions, arguing that community policing—popularized for decades as a racial panacea—is not the solution it seems to be. Tracing this policy back to its origins, they focus on the Los Angeles Police Department, which first introduced community policing after the high-profile Rodney King riots. Drawing on over sixty interviews with officers, residents, and stakeholders in South LA’s “Lakeside” precinct, they show how police tactics amplified—rather than resolved—racial tensions, complicating partnership efforts, crime response and prevention, and accountability. Gascón and Roussell shine a new light on the residents of this neighborhood to address the enduring—and frequently explosive—conflicts between police and communities. At a time when these issues have taken center stage, this volume offers a critical understanding of how community policing really works.

Blue

Author : Joe Domanick
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American policing is in crisis. Here, award-winning investigative journalist Joe Domanick reveals the troubled history of American policing over the past quarter century. He begins in the early 1990s with the beating of Rodney King and the L.A. riots, when the Los Angeles Police Department was caught between a corrupt and racist past and the demands of a rapidly changing urban population. Across the country, American cities faced similar challenges to law and order. In New York, William J. Bratton was spearheading the reorganization of the New York City Transit Police and later the 35,000-strong New York Police Department. His efforts resulted in a dramatic decrease in crime, yet introduced highly controversial policing strategies. In 2002, when Bratton was named the LAPD's new chief, he implemented the lessons learned in New York to change a department that previously had been impervious to reform. Blue ends in 2015 with the LAPD on its unfinished road to reform, as events in Los Angeles, New York, Baltimore, and Ferguson, Missouri, raise alarms about the very strategies Bratton pioneered, and about aggressive racial profiling and the militarization of police departments throughout the United States. Domanick tells his story through the lives of the people who lived it. Along with Bratton, he introduces William Parker, the legendary LAPD police chief; Tom Bradley, the first black mayor of Los Angeles; and Charlie Beck, the hard-nosed ex-gang cop who replaced Bratton as LAPD chief. The result is both intimate and expansive: a gripping narrative that asks big questions about what constitutes good and bad policing and how best to prevent crime, control police abuse, and ease tensions between the police and the powerless. Blue is not only a page-turning read but an essential addition to our scholarship.--Adapted from book jacket.

Introducing community policing in the Los Angeles Police Department

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Los Angeles Police Department Meltdown

Author : James Lasley
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Once considered among the most respected police departments in the world, the LAPD suffered a devastating fall from grace following the 1991 police officer beating of Rodney King and the Los Angeles riots stemming from the officers' acquittal in 1992. Unique to the literature of policing, management, and policy studies, Los Angeles Police Department Meltdown: The Fall of the Professional-Reform Model of Policing presents what can be considered the first and only existing research document truly explaining the reasons behind the LAPD's demise. The book reveals a special inside study performed by the author under the exclusive authority of LAPD Chief of Police Daryl Gates to investigate why the department had begun to disintegrate following the Rodney King incident, and how, if possible, it could be salvaged. The findings presented are based on first-hand written accounts of LAPD officer informants who describe their observations of the department's meltdown as it occurred. These accounts explain why the crime-fighting enforcement style of the once highly regarded Professional-Reform Model of policing (coined at the LAPD) was abandoned in police departments across the nation in favor of the less aggressive community-based policing model. Lost for some 20 years under mysterious circumstances after collection and storage at the LAPD, these officer informant materials were recently retrieved and made available for analysis. They are presented in their entirety in this book. In every respect, this work is the final word on why and how the LAPD--a police organization emulated throughout the world--ultimately self-destructed after 41 years of serving and protecting the City of Angels.

The Thin Blue Line

Author : Matthew Gordon
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For the past thirty years, the Los Angeles Police Department has been accused of endless charges of brutality and corruption. From the highly public and polarizing Rodney King beating, to the shocking Rampart Scandal, many have viewed the department as a brutal, yet effective, crime fight force. To this end, many blame the more controversial acts of the department on a "few bad apples."Covering the time from Chief Gates' tenure until the end of the Rampart Scandal, The Thin Blue Line brings forgotten and startling events from the last thirty years of the L.A.P.D.'s shocking history to life. Attempting to view brutality and corruption through a critical lens, this book uses extensive research to investigate the various charges police corruption as a result of the different policing styles implemented by the department throughout the years, and not the result of a “few bad apples.”

Report of the Independent Commission on the Los Angeles Police Department

Author : Warren Christopher
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In the wake of the Rodney King/Los Angeles Police incident, the Independent Commission on the L.A. Police Dept. was created to examine any aspect of the law enforcement structure in L.A. that might cause or contribute to the excessive use of force. This reports presents the results of this unprecedented inquiry, conducted through witness testimony; interviews of private citizens and current and retired police officers; computerized studies of force reports and complaints filed by the public; reviews of patrol car communications; and examination of the files in civil damage cases. Recommendations are presented in detail.

New Initiatives for a New Los Angeles

Author : California. Legislature. Senate. Special Task Force on a New Los Angeles
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Training the 21st Century Police Officer

Author : Russell W. Glenn
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Restructure the LAPD Training Group to allow the centralization of planning; instructor qualification, evaluation, and retention; and more efficient use of resources.

Community Policing

Author : Geoffrey P. Alpert
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This collection reviews & analyzes aspects of community policing that have prompted increased attention at both the academic & practitioner levels.

The History of Community Policing in the Los Angeles Police Department

Author : Japhet C. Hom
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The Limits of Community Policing

Author : Luis Daniel Gascón
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A critical look at the realities of community policing in South Los Angeles The Limits of Community Policing addresses conflicts between police and communities. Luis Daniel Gascón and Aaron Roussell depart from traditional conceptions, arguing that community policing—popularized for decades as a racial panacea—is not the solution it seems to be. Tracing this policy back to its origins, they focus on the Los Angeles Police Department, which first introduced community policing after the high-profile Rodney King riots. Drawing on over sixty interviews with officers, residents, and stakeholders in South LA’s “Lakeside” precinct, they show how police tactics amplified—rather than resolved—racial tensions, complicating partnership efforts, crime response and prevention, and accountability. Gascón and Roussell shine a new light on the residents of this neighborhood to address the enduring—and frequently explosive—conflicts between police and communities. At a time when these issues have taken center stage, this volume offers a critical understanding of how community policing really works.

Multicultural Law Enforcement

Author : Robert M. Shusta
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For courses in Multicultural Law Enforcement and Special Topics in Policing. From a diverse team of writers whose expertise spans law enforcement and cross-cultural relations, comes a text with comprehensive coverage of sensitive topics and issues related to diversity and multiculturalism facing police in the 21st century. It contains insightful as well as practical information and guidelines on how law enforcement professionals can work effectively with diverse cultural groups, both inside their organizations as well as in the community.

A Study of Contract Services Provided by the Los Angeles County Sheriff s Department to Municipalities in Los Angeles County

Author : Howard H. Earle
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Community Oriented Policing Problem Solving

Author :
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Policing Divisions

Author : Luis Daniel Gascón
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Following the 1992 "uprising", the Los Angeles Police Department (LAPD) was mandated to implement community policing to reduce tensions between police and poor and/or minority residents. Today, violent crime is at a fifty-year low (Rubin & Faturechi, 2010), police-community relations are again a site of contest. Community policing officers assume there is solidarity within communities, yet in crime-ridden neighborhoods, where the community needs protection from itself, that assumption falls short. One example is Lakeside (pseudonym), a South Los Angeles police division, where, since the sixties, neighborhoods have gone from being middle class enclaves to "ghetto to working class community," as one informant said (L.D. Gascón, fieldnotes, February 2, 2012). These transitions are the result of resource scarcity, demographic shifts, and economic restructuring. Now demographically divided, South LA's population may have divergent views of crime and of appropriate police response, and police-community meetings are one point at which these divergent views come to light. Internal community disagreements over ways of addressing crime are often exacerbated when police engage racially diverse residential populations (Skogan & Harnett, 1997). In Lakeside, officers have developed differential community policing practices based on language differences. Black and Latino residents are separated into English- and Spanish- language meetings, affording residents differential access to police power according to language classifications, which in turn are a potential proxy for race. My dissertation analyzes the experiences of residents and officers in this program. I focus on (1) the structure and practice of community policing in a racially diverse community; (2) how residents and officers negotiate crime complaints; (3) how understandings of and responses to crime vary between meetings conducted in English and in Spanish; and (4) whether racial divisions and community identity are challenged or reified in the process of community policing. By examining the "community" side of community policing, this dissertation suggests ways that police can engage residents in mutually productive ways, and thus address the unique challenges of policing multiracial and multicultural urban neighborhoods.

Down Out and Under Arrest

Author : Forrest Stuart
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Forrest Stuart gives us a new framework for understanding life in criminalized communities throughout America. The idea of community policing and of stop-and-frisk and broken windows is just part of the picture, which includes people on both sides of the issue of keeping order in Skid Row communities. Stuart s is a dramatic demonstration of how to understand the daily realities of America s most truly disadvantaged, an understanding that requires a sharp focus on the pervasive role and impact of the police. Policing zero tolerance models in particularis reshaping urban poverty and marginalization in 21st-century America. Stuart immersed himself for several years in the notorious homeless capital of America, which is to say, Skid Row in Los Angeles. It has the largest concentration of standing police forces anywhere in the United States. On their side, the police practice what Stuart calls therapeutic policing a form of virtual social work that is designed to cure the poor of individual pathologies. On the side of the homeless, Stuart finds a cunning set of techniques for evading police contact, which he dubs cop wisdom and which the poor use for intensifying resistance to roustings by the police. The police are tasked with day-to-day management of the growing numbers of citizens falling through the holes in the threadbare social safety net. We see daily patrol practices and routines that amount to hyper-policing in skid row districts. The continuous threat of punishment aims to steer homeless individuals away from self-destructive behaviors while providing incentives to drug recovery, employment, and life skills (in nearby meta-shelters). Minority upheavals now underway across America underscore the divide between cops and the urban poor (almost all of whom are black or Latino). Stuart joins Alice Goffman in revealing the underlying, and often tragic, dynamics."