Search results for: osteoarthritic-joint-pain

Osteoarthritic Joint Pain

Author : Derek J. Chadwick
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Osteoarthritis is a chronic degenerative disease associated with joint pain and loss of joint function. It has an estimated incidence of 4 out of every 100 people and significantly reduces the quality of life in affected individuals. The major symptoms are chronic pain, swelling and stiffness; severe, chronic joint pain is often the central factor that causes patients to seek medical attention. Within the affected joint, there is focal degradation and remodelling of articular cartilage, new bone formation (osteophytes) and mild synovitis. Several mechanisms are thought to contribute to osteoarthritic joint pain. These include mild synovial inflammation, bone oedema, ligament stretching, osteophyte formation and cartilage-derived mediators. Changes in joint biomechanics and muscle strength also influence the severity and duration of joint pain in osteoarthritis. Within the nervous system, the relative contributions of peripheral afferent nociceptive fibres and central mechanisms remain to be defined, and there is limited information on the phenotype of sensory neurons in the OA joint. Importantly, there is no relation between clinical severity, as measured by radiographic changes, and the presence and severity of joint pain. Patients with severe joint pain may have normal joint architecture as determined by X-ray, whereas patients with considerable evidence of joint remodelling may not have significant joint pain. Treatments for osteoarthritic joint pain include non-steroidal anti-inflammatory compounds, exercise, corrective shoes and surgical intervention. There remains a critical need for improved control of joint pain in osteoarthritis. This book brings together contributions from key investigators in the area of osteoarthritic joint pain. It covers the clinical presentation of joint pain, the pathways involved in joint pain, osteoarthritis disease processes and pain, experimental models and pain control. The discussions provide insights into the nature of osteoarthritic joint pain, identify key studies needed to advance understanding of the problem, highlight possible intervention points and indicate future pathways towards a better treatment of osteoarthritic joint pain.

Pain in Osteoarthritis

Author : David T. Felson
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An authoritative investigation of the sources andtreatment of osteoarthritic joint pain Millions of people throughout the world suffer from osteoarthritis (OA)—a medical condition causing its sufferers excruciating pain that is often disabling. This is the first book to offer clinicians an in-depth understanding of the biological sources of osteoarthritic pain and how they can be treated. Here, a team of leading international authorities has contributed state-of-the-art information on: The Neuroscience of Articular Pain—spinal and peripheral mechanisms of joint pain; experimental models for the study of osteoarthritic pain; inflammatory mediators and nociception in arthritis; phantoms in rheumatology; and more Osteoarthritis and Pain—joint mechanisms and neuromuscular aspects of OA; bone pain and pressure in OA joints; structural correlates of OA pain; and more Treatment of Osteoarthritic Pain—general approaches to treatment; treatments targeting pain receptors; treatments targeting biomechanical abnormalities; and treatments targeting inflammation Whether you're a medical professional, researcher, student, or a generalist or specialist focusing on pain or arthritis, this is your one-stop reference for understanding and treating joint pain in osteoarthritis.

Osteoarthritic Joint Pain

Author : Derek J. Chadwick
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Osteoarthritis is a chronic degenerative disease associated with joint pain and loss of joint function. It has an estimated incidence of 4 out of every 100 people and significantly reduces the quality of life in affected individuals. The major symptoms are chronic pain, swelling and stiffness; severe, chronic joint pain is often the central factor that causes patients to seek medical attention. Within the affected joint, there is focal degradation and remodelling of articular cartilage, new bone formation (osteophytes) and mild synovitis. Several mechanisms are thought to contribute to osteoarthritic joint pain. These include mild synovial inflammation, bone oedema, ligament stretching, osteophyte formation and cartilage-derived mediators. Changes in joint biomechanics and muscle strength also influence the severity and duration of joint pain in osteoarthritis. Within the nervous system, the relative contributions of peripheral afferent nociceptive fibres and central mechanisms remain to be defined, and there is limited information on the phenotype of sensory neurons in the OA joint. Importantly, there is no relation between clinical severity, as measured by radiographic changes, and the presence and severity of joint pain. Patients with severe joint pain may have normal joint architecture as determined by X-ray, whereas patients with considerable evidence of joint remodelling may not have significant joint pain. Treatments for osteoarthritic joint pain include non-steroidal anti-inflammatory compounds, exercise, corrective shoes and surgical intervention. There remains a critical need for improved control of joint pain in osteoarthritis. This book brings together contributions from key investigators in the area of osteoarthritic joint pain. It covers the clinical presentation of joint pain, the pathways involved in joint pain, osteoarthritis disease processes and pain, experimental models and pain control. The discussions provide insights into the nature of osteoarthritic joint pain, identify key studies needed to advance understanding of the problem, highlight possible intervention points and indicate future pathways towards a better treatment of osteoarthritic joint pain.

Osteoarthritis

Author : Zoltan Rona
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Osteoarthritis--the most common form of joint disease--may be reversible! At the very least, the signs and symptoms can be arrested, and the discomforts improved enough to allow better joint function. This valuable book provides information about natural remedies such as glucosamine sulfate, chondroitin sulfate, essential fatty acids, niacinamide, and others. It also outlines the type of diet that can be followed to both prevent and manage osteoarthritis.

Step by Step Treatment of Osteoarthritis Knee

Author : Hashmi Syed Musab Rahim, Fatima Lubna
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Osteoarthritis

Author : Mohit Kapoor
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This comprehensive book grants readers exclusive insight into current advancements in the field of osteoarthritis (OA). Contributions from leading scientists and clinicians provide a detailed introduction into current understanding of the pathogenesis of OA, different joint structures affected by this debilitating disease (hip, knee, elbow, shoulder, foot, ankle, hand, wrist, and spine), current knowledge and practice in imaging, joint conservative strategies, OA biomarkers as well as currently available treatments, their safety profile and future therapeutic targets. This book further discusses the potential of regenerative therapies and recent advances in OA Personalized Medicine, and how collection of OA patient’s phenotypic, genetic and proteomic data is able to direct treatment strategies through Bio-Informatics.

All About Osteoarthritis

Author : Nancy E. Lane
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Osteoarthritis afflicts about 25 million people in the United States--two-thirds of all people over 65--and the numbers will only grow in the coming years as baby boomers age. Yet few who suffer from this disease know much about it--how to relieve the pain, what exercises might help lessen their suffering, how to cut down on visits to the doctor. In All About Osteoarthritis, two leading authorities on the disease--Nancy E. Lane and Daniel J. Wallace--join forces to provide the most up-to-date and comprehensive discussion of osteoarthritis available, explaining what osteoarthritis is, how patients can help themselves, and how to find the best resources to manage the disorder. The authors offer information in a clear and accessible style, with detailed illustrations showing how key joints--knees, hips, fingers, backs, hands, and necks--degenerate. They take readers through the steps of diagnosis, how the body is affected, and ways to manage the disease. In user-friendly language, they describe all of the established treatment options, including new medications and their side effects, and help readers determine when surgery may be necessary. The authors also examine alternative treatments, clarifying which work, which may work, and which definitely do not. And they outline recent advances in the field and discuss where these breakthroughs may lead us. While osteoarthritis most acutely affects the elderly, it starts years before, and many people suffer the aches and pains of the condition well before old age. For aging baby boomers, much can be done before osteoarthritis becomes chronic and debilitating. This comprehensive guide will provide an excellent resource for patients and their families, caregivers, and medical professionals.

Treat Your Own Knee Arthritis

Author : Jim Johnson
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If you're looking down at your arthritic knee and seeing only a worn-out joint with eroding cartilage, you're thinking about your knee the wrong way. There are two problems with this line of thinking. First of all, the structural changes that commonly take place in arthritis, things such as cartilage loss, meniscus tears, and bone spurs, can all be found in people with no knee pain. Consider the study that looked at 319 subjects between the ages of 25 and 74 with knee arthritis on x-ray - and found that only 47% had knee pain. Put another way, 53% of these people were walking around with knee arthritis and no pain. Yet another study looked at 49 subjects over the age of 45 with no knee pain or arthritis, and found that 76% of them had meniscus tears! The second problem with focusing on the structural changes in knee arthritis is trying to figure out what's causing your pain. Most of the numerous structures in your knee have nerve pain fibers going to them, so good luck trying to pinpoint which one(s) are the exact source of your pain. In fact, about the only knee structure we can safely rule out is the articular cartilage that can be seen wearing out on x-rays! Knee cartilage itself actually has no pain fibers going to it, and therefore cannot produce any pain. So what now? Treat Your Own Knee Arthritis takes a new approach to an old problem. Instead of worrying about structural problems (that studies show people can live just fine with) you will learn how to fix the functional problems found in knees with arthritis. And as the research shows again and again, if you improve functions such as the strength and proprioception of your knee, the pain goes away. Based entirely on randomized controlled trials, Treat Your Own Knee Arthritis is a simple, yet effective program that can be done in the privacy of your home with minimal cost or equipment. Exercise sheets are also provided to help guide you step-by-step through a six-week program.

Knee Pain

Author : Dr. Bimal Chhajer
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This disease is becoming more common with the increase in average lifespam of the population all over the world. Fifty years back the average lifespan of Indians (called life expectancy at birth) was below 50 years and now it is more than 65 years. The same figures in Japan is close to 80 years and that of USA is 75 or so. This has happened because of improved health care, increased knowledge base about avoiding diseases and better living conditions. It is thus natural that with increased age, more people will suffer from degenerative diseases like Osteoarthritis Knees. It is estimated that about 40 million population (out of the total 260 million) of the United States of America (USA) suffer from this disease. About 70-90% of the aged people in that country suffer from Osteoarthritis Knee. It is estimated that by 2030,70 million Americans above the age of 65 will be at the risk of this chronic disease. In India, though the statistical figures are not available, the percentage is likely to be similar, if not more.

Osteoarthritis

Author : National Clinical Guideline Centre for Acute and Chronic Conditions (Great Britain)
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Osteoarthritis refers to a clinical syndrome of joint pain accompanied by varying degrees of functional limitation and reduced quality of life. It is the most common form of arthritis, and one of the leading causes of pain and disability worldwide. The most commonly affected peripheral joints are the knees, hips and small hand joints. Although pain, reduced function and effects on a person's ability to carry out their day-to-day activities can be important consequences of osteoarthritis, pain in itself is of course a complex biopsychosocial issue, related in part to person expectations and self-efficacy, and associated with changes in mood, sleep and coping abilities. There is often a poor link between changes on an X-ray and symptoms: minimal changes can be associated with a lot of pain and modest structural changes to joints often can occur without with minimal accompanying symptoms. Contrary to popular belief, osteoarthritis is not caused by ageing and does not necessarily deteriorate. There are a number of management and treatment options (both pharmacological and non-pharmacological), which this guideline addresses and which offer effective interventions for control of symptoms and improving function. Osteoarthritis is characterised pathologically by localised loss of cartilage, remodelling of adjacent bone and associated inflammation. A variety of traumas may trigger the need for a joint to repair itself. Osteoarthritis includes a slow but efficient repair process that often compensates for the initial trauma, resulting in a structurally altered but symptom-free joint. In some people, because of either overwhelming trauma or compromised repair, the process cannot compensate, resulting in eventual presentation with symptomatic osteoarthritis; this might be thought of as 'joint failure'. This in part explains the extreme variability in clinical presentation and outcome that can be observed between people, and also at different joints in the same person. There are limitations to the published evidence on treating osteoarthritis. Most studies have focused on knee osteoarthritis, and are often of short duration using single therapies. Although most trials have looked at single joint involvement, in reality many people have pain in more than one joint, which may alter the effectiveness of interventions. This guideline update was originally intended to include recommendations based on a review of new evidence about the use of paracetamol, etoricoxib and fixed-dose combinations of NSAIDs plus gastroprotective agents in the management of osteoarthritis. Draft recommendations based on the evidence reviews for these areas were presented in the consultation version of the guideline. Stakeholder feedback at consultation indicated that the draft recommendations, particularly in relation to paracetamol, would be of limited clinical application without a full review of evidence on the pharmacological management of osteoarthritis. NICE was also aware of an ongoing review by the MHRA of the safety of over-the-counter analgesics. Therefore NICE intends to commission a full review of evidence on the pharmacological management of osteoarthritis, which will start once the MHRA's review is completed, to inform a further guideline update. Until that update is published, the original recommendations (from 2008) on the pharmacological management of osteoarthritis remain current advice. However, the GDG would like to draw attention to the findings of the evidence review on the effectiveness of paracetamol that was presented in the consultation version of the guideline. That review identified reduced effectiveness of paracetamol in the management of osteoarthritis compared with what was previously thought. The GDG believes that this information should be taken into account in routine prescribing practice until the intended full review of evidence on the pharmacological management of osteoarthritis is published (see the NICE website for further details).

Atlas of Osteoarthritis

Author : Nigel Arden
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This Atlas provides an up-to-date and comprehensive overview of the historical and current perspectives on osteoarthritis, including the pathophysiology and epidemiology of the disease. Written by leading authors in the field of osteoarthritis, the book discusses classification, etiology and risk factors for osteoarthritis, the disease course and determinants of osteoarthritis progression, clinical features and diagnosis as well as imaging methods to assess joint damage. The Atlas of Osteoarthritis concludes with the latest treatment updates including both nonpharmacological and pharmacological treatments, as well as surgical recommendations for patients with the disease. Osteoarthritis is the most common form of joint disease causing joint pain, stiffness, and physical disability among adults. It is an important issue for both the individual and society with its impact on public health continuing to grow as a result of the aging population, the rising prevalence of obesity, and the lack of definitive treatments to prevent or halt the progress of the disease.

Tuning Forks and Arthritis

Author : Francine Milford
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A brief introduction on how to use tuning forks to reduce pain for people suffering from arthritis, arthritic joints, and even back problems.

Osteoarthritis

Author : Qian Chen
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The most common form of arthritis is osteoarthritis (OA), which most often affects the hip, knee, foot and hand. The degeneration of joint cartilage and changes in underlying bone and supporting tissues such as ligament leads to pain, stiffness, movement problems and activity limitations. This book, containing three major sections in OA research and therapy, is an update of the book Osteoarthritis - Diagnosis, Treatment and Surgery published by InTech in 2012. The authors are experts in the osteoarthritis field, which include biologists, bioengineers, clinicians, and health professionals. The scientific content of the book will be beneficial to patients, students, researchers, educators, physicians, and health care providers who are interested in the recent progress in osteoarthritis research and therapy.

Pain

Author : Eric EH buddhadharma
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PREFACEThank you for buying this book to cure yourself of this dreaded and painful disease. Many of you may have already spent a fortune trying to find a cure for, at least, to get relief from the pain that you encounter round the clock, each day of your life. First, you suffer from the disease, and then you spend a good amount of time visiting the clinic, spending thousands of dollars in medicines and consultation fees. The doctor tells you straight away, there is no cure for this disease but only relief. Day after day you are on medication, unsuitable for the other organs of your body. In course of time you develop complications and visit other doctors for developing symptoms which may be damaging your other organs. This puts you in a whirlpool of doctors and medicines. This little handy guide will definitely appraise you of all what you need to know and if not cure, at the least provide you with the relief you are seeking elsewhere but never been able to find it. It will advise you how to gradually do away with unwanted medication and find a cure in a simple way.Another good news about this book is, you need not sit in front of your computer to find a cure for RA/OA because our check list shows we have put in all relevant information that you would find searching the net for hours each day for years together. So this guide book will be one book that you need near your bedside to refer to day in and day out. I pray for your fast recovery, God bless you!

Osteoarthritis of the Knee Joint

Author : Sayeed Ahmed MCSP
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The structural and mechanical properties of different tissues of the knee deteriorate progressively, causing pain and disability in people with knee osteoarthritis (OA). However these tissues can remodel themselves in response to mechanical demand placed on them. Therefore an appropriate physical management strategy can reverse degenerative process of the tissues around the knee OA. This in turn can be effective to reduce pain, improve function of the knee joint and hinder the disabling process in people with knee OA. This book has highlighted: - The structural and mechanical properties of the joint tissues as well as their remodelling properties. - The physiopathology that produces pain in OA is discussed. - Finally physical management strategy is discussed.

Physical Therapy for Knee Pain Secondary to Osteoarthritis Future Research Needs

Author : U. S. Department of Health and Human Services
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Osteoarthritis (OA), the most common form of arthritis, is a progressive disorder characterized by gradual loss of cartilage and the development of bony spurs and cysts at the surface and margins of the joints. Inflammation, pain, stiffness, limited movement, and possible deformity of the joint may result. Treatments for OA aim to reduce or control pain, improve physical function, prevent disability, and enhance quality of life—all of which constitute clinical outcomes of importance to patients. Treatment options include pain relievers, anti-inflammatory drugs, weight loss, general physical exercise, PT, and, when conservative treatments fail, surgery. This Future Research Needs (FRN) project is a follow up to the draft Comparative Effectiveness Review “Physical Therapy Interventions for Knee Pain Secondary to Osteoarthritis (OA).” The review was motivated by uncertainty around the effectiveness and comparative effectiveness of physical therapy (PT) treatments for adult patients with knee pain secondary to osteoarthritis (OA). FRN projects identify gaps in the current research that limit the conclusions in CERs and inform those who conduct and fund research of these gaps. FRN projects aim to encourage research likely to fill gaps and make the body of evidence more useful to decisionmakers. The report addressed the following Key Questions (KQs): KQ 1: What are the effectiveness and comparative effectiveness of available PT interventions (without drug treatment) for adult patients with chronic knee pain due to OA on intermediate and patient-centered outcomes when compared with no active treatment or another active PT modality? a. Which patient characteristics are associated with the benefits of examined interventions of PT on intermediate and patient-centered outcomes? b. Do changes in intermediate and patient-centered outcomes differ by the dose, duration, intensity, and frequency of examined interventions of PT? c. Do changes in intermediate and patient-centered outcomes differ by the time of follow up? KQ 2: What is the association between changes in intermediate outcomes with changes in patient-centered outcomes after PT interventions? a. What is the validity of the tests and measures used to determine intermediate outcomes of PT on OA in association with patient-centered outcomes? b. Which intermediate outcomes meet the criteria of surrogates for patient-centered outcomes? c. What are minimal clinically important differences (MCIDs) of the tests and measures used to determine intermediate outcomes? KQ 3: What are the harms from PT interventions available for adult patients with chronic knee pain due to OA when compared with no active treatment or active controls? a. Which patient characteristics are associated with the harms of examined PT interventions? b. Do harms differ by the duration of the treatment and time of follow up? The review was motivated by uncertainty around the effectiveness and comparative effectiveness of physical therapy (PT) treatments for adult patients with knee pain secondary to osteoarthritis (OA). The purpose of this FRN project is to identify and prioritize specific gaps in the current literature on PT for knee pain due to OA that would aid decisionmakers. We used a deliberative process to identify evidence gaps, translate gaps into researchable questions, and solicit stakeholder opinion on the importance of research questions. This report proposes specific research needs along with research design considerations that may be useful in advancing the field.

Managing Osteoarthritis in Primary Care

Author : Gillian Hosie
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Osteoarthritis is the most common cause of musculoskeletal disability, affecting five million people in Britain. By far the majority of cases are managed in the community. A considerable proportion of patients self-medicate, while others are treated by a GP and the primary health care team. This book provides an overview of the condition, its causes and natural history. Diagnosis of osteoarthritis is also explained including descriptions of joint examination, monitoring of progression and assessment of disability. The book advocates a practical approach to osteoarthritis care, the mainstay of which is patient education and symptom management. It provides advice on both pharmacological and non-pharmacological pain management, the use of exercise, physiotherapy and weight loss where necessary. Topics discsussed also include: informing the patient of the disease and its prognosis; ways in which patients can adapt their home and their lifestyle to work within their physical capabilities; and surgery options.

Osteoarthritis

Author : David J. Hunter
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Previous edition: published as by Elizabeth Arden. 2008.

Osteoarthritis

Author : J.-Y. Reginster
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This book is written by worldwide renowned researchers and clinicians in the field of OSTEOARTHRITIS. Latest experimental results in osteoarthritis research are reported. The book describes in detail all aspects of this disease - from pathophysiology and diagnostics to medical, surgical and physical therapy and rehabilitation. This work represents a summary of the current status of clinical and experimental aspects of osteoarthritis.

Mayo Clinic Guide to Arthritis

Author : Lynne S. Peterson
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From the doctors at Mayo Clinic, the top-ranked hospital in the U.S., this book is a complete guide to understanding and living with arthritis. Find the latest expertise on various forms of arthritis, medications and other treatment options, and self care to successfully manage joint pain and continue an active life. If you have joint pain, you know it can lead to frustrating limitations in daily life. In fact, arthritis is the most common cause of disability in the United States. This complex group of joint diseases — osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis and many other forms — affects at least 54 million Americans. But living with arthritis doesn’t have to mean sitting on the sidelines. Understanding the cause of your joint pain is key to finding relief. This book offers the same expert knowledge that Mayo Clinic doctors, nurses and therapists use in caring for patients. Gain a better grasp of how arthritis works, discover the latest advances in treatment options, and find out how activity, your diet, work and daily habits play a role in managing the disease. These tools can help you take control of joint pain to live more comfortably and get back to the activities you love. Mayo Clinic Guide to Arthritis is divided into three parts: Part 1 breaks down different forms of arthritis and joint pain to help you understand their causes, their signs and symptoms, and what each may mean for your health. Part 2 explores the latest in arthritis treatments, including new medications to slow or stop the disease, improved options for joint surgery, joint injections, and evidence-based guidance on pain control and integrative medicine. Part 3 provides practical tips for living with arthritis. Chapters focus on staying active, eating a healthy diet, caring for your mental health, protecting your joints, traveling and working.