No Game No Life, Vol. 9 (light novel)

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Author: Yuu Kamiya

Publisher: Yen Press LLC

ISBN: 0316471380

Category: Fiction

Page: 240

View: 3401

Gamer siblings Sora and Shiro have at last defeated the Old Deus Holou, and now they're switching gears: their next endeavor is to make Holou the number-one idol pop star in all of Disboard! But amid the chaos of their pet project comes a strange message from the representative of the 10th-ranked race, the Ex Machina... Is another arduous battle on the horizon for Sora and Shiro?!

No Game No Life, Please!

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Author: Yuu Kamiya

Publisher: Yen Press LLC

ISBN: 0316517682

Category: Comics & Graphic Novels

Page: 192

View: 6896

Are there...TWO Izunas?! That's too damn many, please! When the old gods come calling, there's no end to the craziness... Later, a snack thief is on the loose and it's up to Izuna to sniff them out! Can the girls corner the culprit, or will they be outsmarted? LET THE GAMES BEGIN!

No Game No Life, Vol. 8 (light novel)

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Author: Yuu Kamiya

Publisher: Yen Press LLC

ISBN: 0316471372

Category: Fiction

Page: 224

View: 4043

History repeats itself...or does it?!With the end of Sora and Shiro's dice game against the Old Deus fast approaching, they're faced with completing Jibril's final task-a strategic simulation game set during the ancient Great War, before the world of Disboard changed. As leaders of the weakest race, Immanity, the gamer siblings have one objective: Ensure that in this version of the War, no one dies. But when their Old Deus opponent demands a sacrifice, Sora and Shiro will have to come up with some unconventional tactics to secure victory!

No Game No Life, Vol. 6 (light novel)

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Author: Yuu Kamiya

Publisher: Yen Press LLC

ISBN: 0316385271

Category: Fiction

Page: 240

View: 4795

Before Sora and Shiro set foot on Disboard, there was another remarkable duo!! Tet, the One True God, takes a break to amuse himself among the mortals only to collapse on the streets of Elkia. When a familiar face finds him and lends a helping hand, the God of Play regales her with a tale from the Great War about a human man who challenged the world and a strange girl who sought to comprehend the human heart... Let the games begin!

No Game No Life, Vol. 5 (light novel)

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Author: Yuu Kamiya

Publisher: Yen Press LLC

ISBN: 0316385247

Category: Fiction

Page: 208

View: 1180

In the world of Disboard, everything is decided by games. Since arriving in this strange place, genius gamer siblings Sora and Shiro have risen to become king and queen of what's left of Disboard's humans. Their latest challenge is winning an unwinnable romance game against the races of Dhampir and Siren. To uncover the true strategy to beat this sadistic game of love, they head for the home of the angelic Flügel: the midair city of Avant Heim. But the Flügel are a hideously powerful race, created specifically to kill gods. Will things really go as planned?

100 Bullets Vol. 9: Strychnine Lives

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Author: Brian Azzarello

Publisher: Vertigo

ISBN: 1401251188

Category: Comics & Graphic Novels

Page: N.A

View: 6670

Brian Azzarello and Eduardo Risso's tale of power and revenge winds through Chicago, Miami, Atlantic City and Juarez in STRYCHNINE LIVES, collecting issues #59-67 of the award-winning series. With the Houses of the Trust warily circling each other, looking for the right angle to take in their impending war, the remaining Minutemen continue to pick their sides - and set up their own battle plans.

The Sacred Generation (Vol.9 of the GLAS Series)

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Author: Natasha Perova

Publisher: Glas

ISBN: 9785717200240

Category: Fiction

Page: 232

View: 3494

Every society has had periods of totalitarianism and terror in one form or another. Russia is not exceptional in this respect. Whether the Russian brand of totalitarianism was worse or better than, say, the Inquisition in Spain, the slave trade in America, Nazism in Germany, or today's Islamic fundamentalism is hard to say. It would be interesting to attempt a comparative analysis. Slavery, or serfdom, was abolished in Russia only in 1862, but Alexander II's decreed could not abolish the mentality of servility overnight. Meek submissiveness of the bulk of the population on one hand, and authoritarian cruelty of the bureaucracy on the other, were to remain a feature of Russian society for a long time afterwards. The third factor in the social equation was the Russian intelligentsia, the bearers of culture in Russia who generated the country's intellectual and artistic values. This independent minded group caused the authorities particular concern and even fear as a constant source of dissidence both before and after the 1917 revolutions. In the initial decades of Soviet rule the working class and peasantry were forcibly driven into labour camps under various pretexts, because the dislocated country needed slave labour to realize its ambitious construction projects. The freedom loving intelligentsia was imprisoned in camps and lunatic asylums, so as to intimidate and exterminate them by apparently legal methods. Gradually the whole nation divided into civilian informers and alarmed citizens, trying hard to be law-abiding but still ending up in the labour camps accused of treason, espionage, cosmopolitanism, and a host of other imaginary crimes. They rarely survived to the end of their sentences in the arctic temperatures of Siberia and the Polar regions. Who can estimate how many political scientists, writers and artists of genius were lost to mankind in those inhuman conditions of the Soviet prison camps? It is no wonder that those decades of totalitarian rule affected people's minds so deeply that, even after several years of democracy, people in their sixties and seventies are afraid to discuss politics over the telephone for fear it might be bugged. The 1960's, a time of positive changes in the West, saw the first political "thaw" in Russia, following revelations about the Stalinist regime by Khrushchev at the Twentieth Congress of the Communist Party in 1956. The generation of intellectuals who reached their prime in the 1960's, and who retained a sincere belief in "socialism with a human face", is known in Russia as the "shestidesyatniks", or sixties generation. Some of them fought for human rights and suffered repression in their turn, while others lay low, only daring to discuss politics or read samizdat poetry in a very narrow circle of friends (those famous gatherings in the kitchen, which was considered less likely to be bugged). The sixties generation are still very active in politics and public life today, and they are the target of hostility from both the right and the left of the political spectrum. The sharpest criticism comes from the younger generation who, happily, have never experienced the kind of pressure their elders were subjected to, and who have also never been thoroughly indoctrinated. Westerners often ask why we put up with bureaucratic oppression, food shortages and queues, violations of human rights, and so on even now. Why don't we protest? The two works we offer you in this issue of Glas convey the atmosphere of invisible oppression and all-pervading fear in which the sixties generation grew up. Boris Yampolsky's "The Old Arbat" set in Moscow in the 1950's, with flashbacks of the 1930's and 1940's; and Vasil Bykov's "Manhunt" is set in the country in the 1930's. In both stories innocent people are persecuted in a way which precludes effective resistance.