New England Forests Through Time

Insights from the Harvard Forest Dioramas

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Author: David R. Foster,John F. O'Keefe

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: Nature

Page: 67

View: 683

Over the past three hundred years New England's landscape has been transformed. The forests were cleared; the land was farmed intensively through the mid-nineteenth century and then was allowed to reforest naturally as agriculture shifted west. Today, in many ways the region is more natural than at any time since the American Revolution. This fascinating natural history is essential background for anyone interested in New England's ecology, wildlife, or landscape. In New England Forests through Time these historical and environmental lessons are told through the world-renowned dioramas in Harvard's Fisher Museum. These remarkable models have introduced New England's landscape to countless visitors and have appeared in many ecology, forestry, and natural history texts. This first book based on the dioramas conveys the phenomenal history of the land, the beauty of the models, and new insights into nature.

Forests in Time

The Environmental Consequences of 1,000 Years of Change in New England

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Author: David R. Foster,John D. Aber

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300115376

Category: History

Page: 477

View: 8548

The Eastern Hemlock, massive and majestic, has played a unique role in structuring northeastern forest environments, from Nova Scotia to Wisconsin and through the Appalachian Mountains to North Carolina, Tennessee, and Alabama. A "foundation species" influencing all the species in the ecosystem surrounding it, this iconic North American tree has long inspired poets and artists as well as naturalists and scientists. Five thousand years ago, the hemlock collapsed as a result of abrupt global climate change. Now this iconic tree faces extinction once again because of an invasive insect, the hemlock woolly adelgid. Drawing from a century of studies at Harvard University's Harvard Forest, one of the most well-regarded long-term ecological research programs in North America, the authors explore what hemlock's modern decline can tell us about the challenges facing nature and society in an era of habitat changes and fragmentation, as well as global change.

Thirty-Eight

The Hurricane That Transformed New England

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Author: Stephen Long

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 030022088X

Category: Nature

Page: 272

View: 2862

The hurricane that pummeled the northeastern United States on September 21, 1938, was New England’s most damaging weather event ever. To call it “New England’s Katrina” might be to understate its power. Without warning, the storm plowed into Long Island and New England, killing hundreds of people and destroying roads, bridges, dams, and buildings that stood in its path. Not yet spent, the hurricane then raced inland, maintaining high winds into Vermont and New Hampshire and uprooting millions of acres of forest. This book is the first to investigate how the hurricane of ’38 transformed New England, bringing about social and ecological changes that can still be observed these many decades later. The hurricane’s impact was erratic—some swaths of forest were destroyed while others nearby remained unscathed; some stricken forests retain their prehurricane character, others have been transformed. Stephen Long explores these contradictions, drawing on survivors’ vivid memories of the storm and its aftermath and on his own familiarity with New England’s forests, where he discovers clues to the storm’s legacies even now. Thirty-Eight is a gripping story of a singularly destructive hurricane. It also provides important and insightful information on how best to prepare for the inevitable next great storm.

Restoration of Boreal and Temperate Forests

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Author: John A. Stanturf

Publisher: CRC Press

ISBN: 0203497783

Category: Nature

Page: 600

View: 2657

While the commitment to protect and restore forest ecosystems has become a policy goal in many countries since the Rio Conference, there is still no general consensus on what constitutes restoration. This authoritative reference presents the best practices for fostering increased sustainability, enhancing biodiversity, and repairing ecosystem func

Witness Tree

Seasons of Change with a Century-Old Oak

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Author: Lynda V. Mapes

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 1632862549

Category: Science

Page: 240

View: 6601

An intimate look at one majestic hundred-year-old oak tree through four seasons--and the reality of global climate change it reveals. In the life of this one grand oak, we can see for ourselves the results of one hundred years of rapid environmental change. It's leafing out earlier, and dropping its leaves later as the climate warms. Even the inner workings of individual leaves have changed to accommodate more CO2 in our atmosphere. Climate science can seem dense, remote, and abstract. But through the lens of this one tree, it becomes immediate and intimate. In Witness Tree, environmental reporter Lynda V. Mapes takes us through her year living with one red oak at the Harvard Forest. We learn about carbon cycles and leaf physiology, but also experience the seasons as people have for centuries, watching for each new bud, and listening for each new bird and frog call in spring. We savor the cadence of falling autumn leaves, and glory of snow and starry winter nights. Lynda takes us along as she climbs high into the oak's swaying boughs, and scientists core deep into the oak's heartwood, dig into its roots and probe the teeming life of the soil. She brings us eye-level with garter snakes and newts, and alongside the squirrels and jays devouring the oak's acorns. Season by season she reveals the secrets of trees, how they work, and sustain a vast community of lives, including our own. The oak is a living timeline and witness to climate change. While stark in its implications, Witness Tree is a beautiful and lyrical read, rich in detail, sweeps of weather, history, people, and animals. It is a story rooted in hope, beauty, wonder, and the possibility of renewal in people's connection to nature.

Agrarian Landscapes in Transition

Comparisons of Long-Term Ecological & Cultural Change

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Author: Charles Redman,David R. Foster

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0190451297

Category: Science

Page: 296

View: 1253

Agrarian Landscapes in Transition researches human interaction with the earth. With hundreds of acres of agricultural land going out of production every day, the introduction, spread, and abandonment of agriculture represents the most pervasive alteration of the Earth's environment for several thousand years. What happens when humans impose their spatial and temporal signatures on ecological regimes, and how does this manipulation affect the earth and nature's desire for equilibrium? Studies were conducted at six Long Term Ecological Research sites within the US, including New England, the Appalachian Mountains, Colorado, Michigan, Kansas, and Arizona. While each site has its own unique agricultural history, patterns emerge that help make sense of how our actions have affected the earth, and how the earth pushes back. The book addresses how human activities influence the spatial and temporal structures of agrarian landscapes, and how this varies over time and across biogeographic regions. It also looks at the ecological and environmental consequences of the resulting structural changes, the human responses to these changes, and how these responses drive further changes in agrarian landscapes. The time frames studied include the ecology of the earth before human interaction, pre-European human interaction during the rise and fall of agricultural land use, and finally the biological and cultural response to the abandonment of farming, due to complete abandonment or a land-use change such as urbanization.

New Forest Through Time

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Author: Georgina Babey

Publisher: Amberley Publishing Limited

ISBN: 1445631547

Category: History

Page: 96

View: 3732

Wild Earth

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Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Biodiversity conservation

Page: N.A

View: 5841

Paddling the Northern Forest Canoe Trail: A Journey Through New England History

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Author: Sam Brakeley

Publisher: Lulu.com

ISBN: 1300367490

Category: Sports & Recreation

Page: 144

View: 8942

Two college friends, Sam Brakeley and Andy Rougeot, embark upon a 39-day canoe trip on the Northern Forest Canoe Trail through New England. Rapids, wildlife, and mishaps all add spice to their 740-mile journey, but it is the unique flavor of northern New England and the eclectic individuals who populate the region that make it singularly memorable.