Search results for: naval-ships-of-austria-hungary

Naval Ships of Austria Hungary

Author : Source Wikipedia
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Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 34. Chapters: Austro-Hungarian Navy ship names, Battleships of Austria-Hungary, Ships of the Austro-Hungarian Navy, Submarines of Austria-Hungary, World War I naval ships of Austria-Hungary, List of battleships of Austria-Hungary, Austro-Hungarian U-boat classes, SMS Szent Istvan, SMS Viribus Unitis, SMS Tegetthoff, List of Austro-Hungarian U-boats, SMS Prinz Eugen, SMS Habsburg, SMS Budapest, SMS Wien, SMS Arpad, SMS Erzherzog Karl, SMS Erzherzog Ferdinand Max, SMS Babenburg, SMS Erzherzog Friedrich, SMS Kaiserin und Konigin Maria Theresia, SMS Teodo, List of ships of the Austro-Hungarian Navy, SMS Zenta, SMS Lussin, SMS Panther, SMS Leopard, SMS Kaiser Franz Joseph I, SMS Tiger, SMS Admiral Spaun, SMS Kaiserin Elisabeth, SMS Boa, Greek battleship Vasilissa Olga, SMS Sankt Georg, TA48, NMS Smeul, SMS Novara. Excerpt: The Austro-Hungarian Navy (Kaiserliche und Konigliche Kriegsmarine, shortened to k.u.k. Kriegsmarine) built a series of battleships between the early 1900s and 1917. To defend its Adriatic coast in wartime, Austria-Hungary had previously built a series of smaller ironclad warships, including coastal defense ships, and armored cruisers. The appointment of Admiral Hermann von Spaun to the post of State Secretary of the Navy in 1897 accelerated naval construction and under the command of Franz Joseph I of Austria, the k.u.k. Kriegsmarine began a program of naval expansion at the beginning of the 20th century. The navy immediately pushed for the construction of the three Habsburg-class battleships, after which soon followed three Erzherzog Karl-class, all of which were pre-dreadnoughts. Several years passed before the Radetzky-class battleships were built. These were the last pre-dreadnought battleships to be built by the Austro-Hungarian Navy and were soon succeeded by the Tegetthoff-class battleship class being...

The Naval Policy of Austria Hungary 1867 1918

Author : Lawrence Sondhaus
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The Austro-Hungarian navy warrants recognition because it functioned far better than most organs of the multinational Habsburg state. Ultimately, in the pre-World War I age of navalism, the fleet provided a unique common cause for a wide variety of nationalities and political parties. Dramatic funding increases fueled the expansion of the fleet, and lucrative naval contracts, judiciously distributed, reinforced and further broadened the navy's base of support. Though often criticized by its German ally, the Austro-Hungarian navy succeeded in defending the Adriatic throughout World War I, in the process requiring the constant attention of a significant share of enemy sea power; as late as the spring of 1918, an American admiral characterized the Adriatic as "an Austrian lake." The navy collapsed only when Austria-Hungary as a whole disintegrated, in the last days of the war. This detailed study charts the uneven growth of the Austro-Hungarian navy from its high point following Archduke Ferdinand Max's administration and the War of 1866 to its ultimate dissolution after World War I. In following this development, Sondhaus not only relates the operational aspects of the Habsburg navy but also traces the growth of popular navalism in Austria-Hungary, the role of naval expansion in stimulating industrial development, and the peculiar difficulties of navy commanders in dealing with the Habsburg nationality problem and the cumbersome politics of Austro-Hungarian dualism. Drawing on a vast variety of archival sources and government documents and protocols, Sondhaus analyzes economic factors carefully and shows how these tended to complicate, perhaps even to override, political divisions. He ably demonstrates how such varied factors as the wavering policy of Italy, French naval theory, the need for consensus within the Dual Monarchy, and the general European escalation in naval armaments influenced the fortunes of the fleet.

Austro Hungarian Battleships 1914 18

Author : Ryan K. Noppen
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Despite imperial politics, a modern Austro-Hungarian battleship fleet was built and contested Italian dominance of the Adriatic and the Mediterranean through a series of daring naval raids that netted greater success than anything the German High Seas Fleet accomplished in the North Sea. The nineteenth century saw the assertion of Habsburg sea power over the Adriatic from the Austrian inheritance of the Venetian fleet in 1797 to Rear Admiral Wilhelm von Tegetthoff's stunning victory over a superior Italian force at the Battle of Lissa in 1866 to the gradual creation of a modern battle fleet beginning in the 1890s. Austria-Hungary did not have an overseas empire; its empire lay within its own boundaries and the primary purpose of its navy until the beginning of the twentieth century was the defense of its coastline. As its merchant marine dramatically grew in the late nineteenth century, Austro-Hungarian admirals believed that the navy should take a more proactive policy of defense, defending not only the coastline but the greater Adriatic and even the Mediterranean waters which the empire's merchant ships plied. The 1890s saw the beginning of a series of naval building programs that would create a well-balanced modern fleet. Cruisers were constructed for the protection of overseas trade and for "showing the flag" but the decisive projection of Austria-Hungary's commitment to control the Adriatic was the construction of a force of modern battleships. Compared to the British, French, Germans, and even Italians, the Austro-Hungarians were relative latecomers to the design and construction of battleships. Austro-Hungarian naval policy tended to be reactionary rather than proactive; its admirals closely followed Italian naval developments and sought appropriate countermeasures even though the two nations were tenuously bound together by the Triple Alliance pact of 1882. Despite the naval arms race throughout Europe at the time, the navy had difficulty obtaining funds for new ships as the Hungarian government was reluctant to fund a fleet that principally served the maritime interests of the ethnically German portion of the empire. The difficulties experienced in battleship funding and construction mirrored the political difficulties and ethnic rivalries within the empire. Nevertheless by August of 1914, the Austro-Hungarian fleet had a force of nine battleships, three pre-dreadnoughts, and one dreadnought (three more in the final stages of construction). This book will survey the five classes of Austro-Hungarian battleships in service during the First World War.

Austro Hungarian Warships of World War I

Author : René Greger
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The Imperial and Royal Austro Hungarian Navy

Author : Anthony Eugene Sokol
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THE TEGETTHOFF CLASS

Author : Andy South
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In 1906 their was a new club in town. One that only the richest and most powerful of nations could really afford to join. It's chief asset was bigger, faster, shapelier and more powerful than all that had gone before. Membership of this 'exclusive' club sent the message "don't mess with us". As with all new 'must-haves' those who couldn't afford to join, 'wanted-in' all the more, so they too would be seen as a 'Great Power'. In 1906 the must have item was the dreadnought, and the Hapsburg’s wanted in. The Austro-Hungarian empire only ever built one class of dreadnought, the four ships of the Tegetthoff class. They were poorly designed, poorly built and suffered 50% losses during the First World War. They were possibly the least successful of their type, but for all their flaws, they have a amazing tale to impart. A tale of corruption, a blind and deaf designer, Italian frogmen and torpedo boats, of revolutions and of an ill-conceived design. This is new edition of a old book, rewritten and I hope an improvement on its poorer predecessor. The tale is told chronologically and draws from a number of sources which I have credited at the back.

A BRIEF HISTORY OF THE AUSTRIAN NAVY

Author : Wilhelm Donko
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A Brief History of the Austrian Navy 1382 - 1918

Austro Hungarian Battleships 1914 18

Author : Ryan K. Noppen
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Austria-Hungary did not have an overseas empire; its empire lay within its own boundaries and the primary purpose of its navy until the beginning of the twentieth century was the defense of its coastline. As its merchant marine dramatically grew, admirals believed that the navy should take a more proactive policy of defense. The 1890s saw the beginning of a series of naval building programs that would create a well-balanced modern fleet. Cruisers were constructed for the protection of overseas trade and for “showing the flag” but the decisive projection of Austria-Hungary's commitment to control the Adriatic was the construction of a force of modern battleships. Despite the naval arms race throughout Europe at the time, the navy had difficulty obtaining funds for new ships. The difficulties experienced in battleship funding and construction mirrored the political difficulties and ethnic rivalries within the empire. Nevertheless by August of 1914, the Austro-Hungarian had a fleet of battleships. This book details the five classes of Austro-Hungarian battleships in service during World War I.

Austro Hungarian Naval Policy 1904 1914

Author : Milan Vego
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This unique and comprehensive account describes the interplay of internal and external factors in the emergence of the Austro-Hungarian Navy from a coastal defence force in 1904 to a respectable battle force capable of the joint operations with other Triple Alliance fleets in the Mediterranean by the eve of World War I. By 1914 the Austro-Hungarian Navy was the sixth largest navy in the world and the quality of its officers and men was widely recognised by most European naval observers at the time. The book describes the relationships between naval leaders, the heir to the throne Archduke Francis Ferdinand, and the Parliament in shaping the dual Monarchy's naval policy. It also shows how the changes in foreign policy in Italy and underlying animosities between Rome and Vienna led to a naval race in the Adriatic that eventually bolstered Germany's naval position in respect to Great Britain in the North Sea.

Navies of Europe

Author : Lawrence Sondhaus
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Europe ruled the waves for most of the modern era and even when its navies were eclipsed in size by the US force, they continued to dominate world wars. In this unique history of Europe's naval forces, Larry Sondhaus charts the development of naval warfare from the transition to steam to recent actions in the Persian Gulf. Combining detailed technical information with an in-depth comparison of warfare and tactics across some of the key conflicts of the modern world, this is an absorbing account of European and British seapower, past and present.

Sea Power Monograph

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A Naval History of World War I

Author : Paul G. Halpern
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The book is also notable for its inclusion of now-forgotten strategies for naval operations that never materialized. Halpern's discussion of dashed endeavors includes American plans to land Marines on the Sabbioncello Peninsula in the Adriatic, Churchill's stratagem for landings on islands off the German coast, and other British gambits on the Danube River and Baltic Sea. With a clear and authoritative voice, the author lends an admirable cohesiveness to this encompassing view of World War I naval operations, both realized and unrealized.

Crisis in the Mediterranean

Author : Jon Henderson
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The geopolitical situation in the Mediterranean before the First World War has been generally ignored by historians. However, in the years before the War, the fact that the Mediterranean was shifting from British control to a wide open, anarchic state occupied the minds of many leaders in Austria-Hungary, Italy, France and Great Britain. This change was driven by three largely understudied events: the weakening of the British Mediterranean Fleet to provide more ships for the North Sea, Austria-Hungary's decision to build a navy capable of operating in the Mediterranean, and Italy's decision to seek naval security in the Triple Alliance after the Italo-Turkish War. These three factors radically altered the Mediterranean situation in the years leading up to the First World War, forcing Britain and France to seek accommodation with each other and France to begin rapidly building ships to defend both British and French interests. However, all of this activity has been largely obscured by the July Crisis of 1914 and the ensuing World War. Traditional history has looked backward from these events, and, in so doing, ignored the turbulent seas building in the Mediterranean. Conversely, this dissertation seeks to understand these events as they unfolded, to understand how policymakers understood the changing Mediterranean world. Ultimately, this dissertation seeks to redress the imbalance between historians, who have viewed the history of the Mediterranean in the early 20th century as a largely stable one, and policymakers in the Great Powers, who viewed the Mediterranean as a highly unstable region, and struggled to come to terms with that instability.

Austro Hungarian Cruisers and Destroyers 1914 18

Author : Ryan K. Noppen
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At the outbreak of World War I Austria-Hungary had four modern light cruisers and twenty modern destroyers at their disposal, constructed in the early 20th century to defend their growing overseas interests. It was these fast light vessels, not the fleet's prized battleships, which saw most action during the war; from the bombardment of enemy batteries during the Montenegrin Campaign to their victory over the Allied fleet at the Battle of the Strait of Otranto in 1917. Using specially-commissioned artwork author Ryan Noppen examines the cruisers and destroyers that the Austro-Hungarian Empire had at their disposal during World War I. His study covers their design and development, with thrilling combat reports highlighting the way in which the strategies evolved throughout the Adriatic Campaign.

Naval Warfare 1815 1914

Author : Lawrence Sondhaus
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This book looks at the transition of wooden sailing fleets to the modern steel navy. It details the technological breakthroughs that brought about this change - steampower, armour, artillery and torpedoes, and looks at their affect on naval strategy and tactics. Part of the ever-growing and prestigious Warfare and History series, this book is a must for enthusiasts of military history.

U 1 Class Submarines Austria Hungary

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World of Battleship

Author : Bruce Taylor
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World War I Day by Day

Author : Morgan Servin
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World War I was the most destructive conflict the world had ever seen. Few could have predicted how the assassination of the Austrian-Hungarian heir to the throne, Archduke Franz Ferdinand, and the subsequent declaration of war on Serbia in July 1914 would escalate into a global conflict that would claim the lives of more than nine million people in little more than four years. With the 20th century still just a teenager, Germany, Great Britain, Russia, and France – obliged by historic treaties to defend other nations – were soon drawn into the conflict. Their leaders failed to grasp the full implications of the hostilities and it was commonly expected that the war would be finished by Christmas. Troops were quickly mobilized, with the Western and Eastern Fronts soon taking shape as the conflict spread. The Great War, as it became known, saw horrific acts of violence that included: German submarines targeting neutral merchant and civilian ships as well as military vessels; the first use of chemical weapons (German deployment of a poisonous gas during the Second Battle of Ypres); and the use of fledgling flying machines to bombard towns and their civilian inhabitants. Both sides, desperate to gain supremacy, waged a frantic battle that saw technological advances in the weapons of war with aircraft, tanks, and naval vessels being continuously developed and improved. The conflict saw some of the most infamous engagements of all time in the Gallipoli Campaign, the Battle of Verdun, the Battle of Passchendaele, and the Battle of the Somme before peace was restored to the world in November 1918.

A Fleet in Being

Author : Russell Phillips
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The Kaiserliche und Königliche Kriegsmarine – The Austro-Hungarian Navy – was in at the beginning of World War I when Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife Sophie lay in state abord its flagship, and at the end when it dissolved along with the empire that commanded it. During the war, this small but powerful “fleet in being” forced the Allies to maintain a blockade of the Otranto Straits. German and Austro-Hungarian u-boats ran riot elsewhere in the Mediterranean even though the capital ships almost never left port. Illustrated with thirty photographs and drawings, this book provides a comprehensive and detailed reference of the ships that made up the KuK Kriegsmarine, its operations, and the unique problems this unusual fleet faced, from contentious duelling parliaments to ships built by landlocked Hungary.

The Great War at Sea

Author : Lawrence Sondhaus
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This is a major new naval history of the First World War which reveals the decisive contribution of the war at sea to Allied victory. In a truly global account, Lawrence Sondhaus traces the course of the campaigns in the North Sea, Atlantic, Adriatic, Baltic and Mediterranean and examines the role of critical innovations in the design and performance of ships, wireless communication and firepower. He charts how Allied supremacy led the Central Powers to attempt to revolutionize naval warfare by pursuing unrestricted submarine warfare, ultimately prompting the United States to enter the war. Victory against the submarine challenge, following their earlier success in sweeping the seas of German cruisers and other surface raiders, left the Allies free to use the world's sea lanes to transport supplies and troops to Europe from overseas territories, and eventually from the United States, which proved a decisive factor in their ultimate victory.