Search results for: native-american-place-names-of-connecticut

Native American Place Names of Connecticut

Author : R. A. Douglas-Lithgow
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This dictionary of Native American places was originally published in 1909. Alphabetically arranged by Native American name, this reference work gives insight into the Native origins of Connecticut cities, towns, rivers, streams, lakes, and other locales. The Pequots and Mohegans formed the majority of Connecticut Natives, occupying the territory from Narraganset to the Hudson River, along the Connecticut shore, and including Long Island. The Mystic River gets its name from Mistick meaning ""great tidal river.""

Native American Place Names of Maine New Hampshire Vermont

Author : R. A. Douglas-Lithgow
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This dictionary of Native American places was originally published in 1909. Alphabetically arranged by Native American name, this reference work gives insight into the Native origins of Maine, New Hampshire, and Vermont cities, towns, rivers, streams, lakes, and other locales. The Abnaki confederacy of tribes of northern New England gets their name from the word Wabunaki meaning ""land or country of the east"" or ""morning land.""

Native American Place Names of Massachusetts

Author : R. A. Douglas-Lithgow
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This dictionary of Native American places was originally published in 1909. Alphabetically arranged by Native American name, this reference work gives insight into the Native origins of Massachusetts cities, towns, rivers, streams, lakes, and other locales. The current state of Massachusetts retains the name of the once inhabiting tribe, although its people were decimated by illness and disorganized by warfare around 1617. Massachusetts is a word meaning ""a hill in the form of an arrow-head.""

Native American Place Names of Rhode Island

Author : R. A. Douglas-Lithgow
File Size : 64.12 MB
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This dictionary of Native American places was originally published in 1909. Alphabetically arranged by Native American name, this reference work gives insight into the Native origins of Rhode Island cities, towns, rivers, streams, lakes, and other locales. What was the Narragansett territory is closely aligned with the current boundaries of the state of Rhode Island. The significance of the word Narragansett is ""at the little point"" or ""island.""

Native American Placenames of the United States

Author : William Bright
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This volume combines historical research and linguistic fieldwork with native speakers from across the United States to present the first comprehensive, up-to-date, scholarly dictionary of American placenames derived from native languages." "Linguist William Bright assembled a team of twelve editorial consultants - experts in Native American languages - and many other native contributors to prepare this lexicon of eleven thousand placenames along with their etymologies. New data from leading scholars make this volume an invaluable reference for students of American Indian culture, folklore, and local histories. Bright's introduction explains his methodology and the contents of each entry. This comprehensive, alphabetical lexicon preserves native language as it details the history and culture found in American indian placenames.

Roxbury Place name Stories

Author : Jeannine Green
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Every place on earth has a name. Never noticed the place-names in your town? Then take a look at these tales; you'll learn some things about where you live. These stories are about a rural Connecticut town settled in the 1700s. Place-names are everywhere on rivers, roads, brooks, hills, buildings, parks, cemeteries, nature preserves, even rocks. The names are from Englishmen, Indians, plants, animals, battles, the Bible, hell, heroes, celebrities, and just plain folks. Place-names are strange creatures, but they all reveal the history, culture, and eccentricities of people who passed through even in your town. Rummage around these tales if you're a librarian, historian, geographer, genealogist, traveler, or resident of this planet. Advance Praise from Roxbury, Conn. Notables lasting treasure for our community insights into nuggets of Roxbury's heritage quick and pleasurable read Barbara Henry, First Selectman extraordinary vade mecum informs and amuses paints a living portrait of Roxbury Steven Schinke, President, Roxbury Land Trust exhaustive research into town records, printed sources, unpublished manuscripts and the memories of older residents clear panorama of where white settlers first arrived in the 18th century Timothy Field Beard, FASG, Town Historian important local history and delightful read Valerie G. Annis, Director, Minor Memorial Library.

Native America A State by State Historical Encyclopedia 3 volumes

Author : Daniel S. Murphree
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Employing innovative research and unique interpretations, these essays provide a fresh perspective on Native American history by focusing on how Indians lived and helped shape each of the United States. • 50 chapters examine the role of Native Americans in the history and development of each state • Contributions from more than 30 distinguished native and nonnative scholars from around the world, each providing a unique perspective on the states and the native peoples who lived there both before and after statehood • A chronology of significant events in Native American history for each state from the pre-colonial period to the present • Extensive, interdisciplinary bibliographies on Native American history in each state

Indian Placenames in America

Author : Sandy Nestor
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The American Indians have lost much of their land over the years, but their legacy is evident in the many places around the United States that have Indian names. Countless placenames have, however, been corrupted over time, and numerous placenames have similar spellings but different meanings. This reference work is a reprint in one combined volume of the two-volume set published by McFarland in 2003 and 2005. Volume One covers the name origins and histories of cities, towns and villages in the United States that have Indian names. It is arranged alphabetically by state, then alphabetically by city, town or village name. Additional data include population figures and county names. Probable Indian placenames with no certain origin also receive entries, and as much history as possible is provided about those locations. Volume Two covers more than 1400 rivers, lakes, mountains and other natural features in the United States with Indian names. It is arranged by state, and then alphabetically by natural feature. Counties are provided for most entries, with multiple counties listed for some entries where appropriate. In addition to name origins and meanings, geophysical data such as the heights of mountains and lengths of waterways are indicated.

Dutch and Indigenous Communities in Seventeenth Century Northeastern North America

Author : Lucianne Lavin
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Examines the significant impact of Dutch traders and settlers on the early history of Northeastern North America, and their relationships with its Indigenous peoples. This volume of essays by historians and archaeologists offers an introduction to the significant impact of Dutch traders and settlers on the early history of Northeastern North America, as well as their extensive and intensive relationships with its Indigenous peoples. Often associated with the Hudson River Valley, New Netherland actually extended westward into present day New Jersey and Delaware and eastward to Cape Cod. Further, New Netherland was not merely a clutch of Dutch trading posts: settlers accompanied the Dutch traders, and Dutch colonists founded towns and villages along Long Island Sound, the mid-Atlantic coast, and up the Connecticut, Hudson, and Delaware River valleys. Unfortunately, few nonspecialists are aware of this history, especially in what was once eastern and western New Netherland (southern New England and the Delaware River Valley, respectively), and the essays collected here help strengthen the case that the Dutch deserve a more prominent position in future history books, museum exhibits, and school curricula than they have previously enjoyed. The archaeological content includes descriptions of both recent excavations and earlier, unpublished archaeological investigations that provide new and exciting insights into Dutch involvement in regional histories, particularly within Long Island Sound and inland New England. Although there were some incidences of cultural conflict, the archaeological and documentary findings clearly show the mutually tolerant, interdependent nature of Dutch-Indigenous relationships through time. One of the essays, by a Mohawk community member, provides a thought-provoking Indigenous perspective on Dutch–Native American relationships that complements and supplements the considerations of his fellow writers. The new archaeological and ethnohistoric information in this book sheds light on the motives, strategies, and sociopolitical maneuvers of seventeenth-century Native leadership, and how Indigenous agency helped shape postcontact histories in the American Northeast. Lucianne Lavin is Director of Research and Collections at the Institute for American Indian Studies in Washington, Connecticut. She is the author of Connecticut’s Indigenous Peoples: What Archaeology, History, and Oral Traditions Teach Us about Their Communities and Cultures.

Haddam 1870 1930

Author : Charlotte Gradie
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Haddam: 1870–1930 recounts the story of a dynamic period in the history of Haddam. Spanning the Connecticut River some 16 miles from Long Island Sound, Haddam was founded in 1662. It soon became a shipping and administrative center. After the Civil War, the population stabilized, as in many rural New England localities. Shipping declined and the town lost its courthouse. Rejecting stagnation, the people of Haddam capitalized on their Connecticut River location and fast-running streams to develop industries as complements to agriculture and quarrying. This period of industrial expansion is exemplified by Clark Cutaway Harrow and the D & H Scovil Hoe Companies. The population also changed, as immigrants arrived and supported the economy and culture. Let Haddam: 1870–1930 lead you through a more exciting and vibrant time in an important community.