Literary Culture and U.S. Imperialism

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Literary Culture and U.S. Imperialism

Literary Culture and U.S. Imperialism

From the Revolution to World War II

  • Author: N.A
  • Publisher: N.A
  • ISBN: 9780198030119
  • Category: American literature
  • Page: 377
  • View: 9481
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Literary Culture and U.S Imperialism : From the Revolution to World War II

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Literary Culture and U.S Imperialism : From the Revolution to World War II

Literary Culture and U.S Imperialism : From the Revolution to World War II

From the Revolution to World War II

  • Author: John Carlos Rowe Professor of English University of California at Irvine
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA
  • ISBN: 0195351231
  • Category: Literary Criticism
  • Page: 400
  • View: 5088
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John Carlos Rowe, considered one of the most eminent and progressive critics of American literature, has in recent years become instrumental in shaping the path of American studies. His latest book examines literary responses to U.S. imperialism from the late eighteenth century to the 1940s. Interpreting texts by Charles Brockden Brown, Poe, Melville, John Rollin Ridge, Twain, Henry Adams, Stephen Crane, W. E. B Du Bois, John Neihardt, Nick Black Elk, and Zora Neale Hurston, Rowe argues that U.S. literature has a long tradition of responding critically or contributing to our imperialist ventures. Following in the critical footsteps of Richard Slotkin and Edward Said, Literary Culture and U.S. Imperialism is particularly innovative in taking account of the public and cultural response to imperialism. In this sense it could not be more relevant to what is happening in the scholarship, and should be vital reading for scholars and students of American literature and culture.

Post-Nationalist American Studies

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Post-Nationalist American Studies

Post-Nationalist American Studies

  • Author: John Carlos Rowe
  • Publisher: Univ of California Press
  • ISBN: 9780520224391
  • Category: History
  • Page: 258
  • View: 7725
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Post-Nationalist American Studies seeks to revise the cultural nationalism and celebratory American exceptionalism that tended to dominate American studies in the Cold War era, adopting a less insular, more transnational approach to the subject.

Writing Indian Nations

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Writing Indian Nations

Writing Indian Nations

Native Intellectuals and the Politics of Historiography, 1827-1863

  • Author: Maureen Konkle
  • Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press
  • ISBN: 0807875902
  • Category: Social Science
  • Page: 384
  • View: 4506
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In the early years of the republic, the United States government negotiated with Indian nations because it could not afford protracted wars politically, militarily, or economically. Maureen Konkle argues that by depending on treaties, which rest on the equal standing of all signatories, Europeans in North America institutionalized a paradox: the very documents through which they sought to dispossess Native peoples in fact conceded Native autonomy. As the United States used coerced treaties to remove Native peoples from their lands, a group of Cherokee, Pequot, Ojibwe, Tuscarora, and Seneca writers spoke out. With history, polemic, and personal narrative these writers countered widespread misrepresentations about Native peoples' supposedly primitive nature, their inherent inability to form governments, and their impending disappearance. Furthermore, they contended that arguments about racial difference merely justified oppression and dispossession; deriding these arguments as willful attempts to evade the true meanings and implications of the treaties, the writers insisted on recognition of Native peoples' political autonomy and human equality. Konkle demonstrates that these struggles over the meaning of U.S.-Native treaties in the early nineteenth century led to the emergence of the first substantial body of Native writing in English and, as she shows, the effects of the struggle over the political status of Native peoples remain embedded in contemporary scholarship.

American Literature’s Aesthetic Dimensions

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American Literature’s Aesthetic Dimensions

American Literature’s Aesthetic Dimensions

  • Author: Cindy Weinstein,Christopher Looby
  • Publisher: Columbia University Press
  • ISBN: 0231520778
  • Category: Literary Criticism
  • Page: 432
  • View: 1029
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Rethinking the category of aesthetics in light of recent developments in literary theory and social criticism, the contributors to this volume showcase the interpretive possibilities available to those who bring politics, culture, ideology, and conceptions of identity into their critiques. Essays combine close readings of individual works and authors with more theoretical discussions of aesthetic theory and its relation to American literature. In their introduction, Weinstein and Looby argue that aesthetics never left American literary critique. Instead, the essay casts the current "return to aesthetics" as the natural consequence of shortcomings in deconstruction and new historicism, which led to a reconfiguration of aesthetics. Subsequent essays demonstrate the value and versatility of aesthetic considerations in literature, from eighteenth-century poetry to twentieth-century popular music. Organized into four groups—politics, form, gender, and theory—contributors revisit the canonical works of Henry James, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and Stephen Crane, introduce the overlooked texts of Constance Fenimore Woolson and Earl Lind, and unpack the complexities of the music of The Carpenters. Deeply rooted in an American context, these essays explore literature's aesthetic dimensions in connection to American liberty and the formation of political selfhood. Contributors include Edward Cahill, Ivy G. Wilson, June Ellison, Dorri Beam, Christopher Castiglia, Christopher Looby, Wendy Steiner, Cindy Weinstein, Trish Loughran, Jonathan Freedman, Elisa New, Dorothy Hale, Mary Esteve, Eric Lott, Sianne Ngai

The Men Who Knew Too Much

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The Men Who Knew Too Much

The Men Who Knew Too Much

Henry James and Alfred Hitchcock

  • Author: Susan M. Griffin,Alan Nadel
  • Publisher: Oxford University Press
  • ISBN: 019991057X
  • Category: Literary Criticism
  • Page: 288
  • View: 5503
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Henry James and Alfred Hitchcock knew too much. Self-imposed exiles fully in the know, they approached American and European society as inside-outsiders, a position that afforded them a kind of double vision. Masters of their arts, manipulators of their audiences, prescient and pathbreaking in their techniques, these demanding and meticulous artists fiercely defended authorial and directorial control. Their fictions and films are obsessed with knowledge and its powers: who knows what? What is there to know? The Men Who Knew Too Much innovatively pairs these two greats, showing them to be at once classic and contemporary. Over a dozen major scholars and critics take up works by James and Hitchcock, in paired sets, to explore the often surprising ways that reading James helps us watch Hitchcock and what watching Hitchcock tells us about reading James. A wide-range of approaches offer fresh insights about spectatorship, narrative structure, and cinematic representation, as well as the relationship between technology and art, the powers of silence, sensory-and sensational-experiences, the impact of cognition, and the uncertainty of interpretation. The essays explore the avowal and disavowal of familial bonds, as well as questions of Victorian convention, female agency, and male anxiety. And they fruitfully engage issues related to patriarchy, colonialism, national, transnational, and global identities. The capacious collection, with its brilliant insights and intellectual surprises, is equally compelling in its range and cogency for James readers and film theorists, for Hitchcock fans and James scholars.

The History of American Foreign Policy: v.1: To 1920

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The History of American Foreign Policy: v.1: To 1920

The History of American Foreign Policy: v.1: To 1920

  • Author: Jerald A Combs
  • Publisher: Routledge
  • ISBN: 1317456378
  • Category: Business & Economics
  • Page: 256
  • View: 3877
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Now thoroughly updated, this respected text provides a clear, concise, and affordable narrative and analytical history of American foreign policy from the revolutionary period to the present. This edition includes an all-new chapter on the George W. Bush presidency, 9/11, and the war in Iraq. The historiographical essays at the end of each chapter have been revised to reflect the most recent scholarship."The History of American Foreign Policy" chronicles events and policies with emphasis on the international setting and constraints within which American policy-makers had to operate; the domestic pressures on those policy-makers; and the ideologies, preferences, and personal idiosyncrasies of the leaders themselves. The new edition also provides expanded coverage of the role of cultural and intellectuual factors in setting up the problems faced by U.S. policy-makers, as well as new materials on globalization and the War on Terror.

Cold War Orientalism

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Cold War Orientalism

Cold War Orientalism

Asia in the Middlebrow Imagination, 1945-1961

  • Author: Christina Klein
  • Publisher: Univ of California Press
  • ISBN: 0520936256
  • Category: Literary Criticism
  • Page: 336
  • View: 8006
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In the years following World War II, American writers and artists produced a steady stream of popular stories about Americans living, working, and traveling in Asia and the Pacific. Meanwhile the U.S., competing with the Soviet Union for global power, extended its reach into Asia to an unprecedented degree. This book reveals that these trends—the proliferation of Orientalist culture and the expansion of U.S. power—were linked in complex and surprising ways. While most cultural historians of the Cold War have focused on the culture of containment, Christina Klein reads the postwar period as one of international economic and political integration—a distinct chapter in the process of U.S.-led globalization. Through her analysis of a wide range of texts and cultural phenomena—including Rodgers and Hammerstein's South Pacific and The King and I, James Michener's travel essays and novel Hawaii, and Eisenhower's People-to-People Program—Klein shows how U.S. policy makers, together with middlebrow artists, writers, and intellectuals, created a culture of global integration that represented the growth of U.S. power in Asia as the forging of emotionally satisfying bonds between Americans and Asians. Her book enlarges Edward Said's notion of Orientalism in order to bring to light a cultural narrative about both domestic and international integration that still resonates today.

Race, Romance, and Rebellion

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Race, Romance, and Rebellion

Race, Romance, and Rebellion

Literatures of the Americas in the Nineteenth Century

  • Author: Colleen C. O'Brien
  • Publisher: University of Virginia Press
  • ISBN: 0813934907
  • Category: Literary Criticism
  • Page: 224
  • View: 4922
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As in many literatures of the New World grappling with issues of slavery and freedom, stories of racial insurrection frequently coincided with stories of cross-racial romance in nineteenth-century U.S. print culture. Colleen O’Brien explores how authors such as Harriet Jacobs, Elizabeth Livermore, and Gertrudis Gómez de Avellaneda imagined the expansion of race and gender-based rights as a hemispheric affair, drawing together the United States with Africa, Cuba, and other parts of the Caribbean. Placing less familiar women writers in conversation with their more famous contemporaries—Ralph Waldo Emerson, Margaret Fuller, and Lydia Maria Child—O’Brien traces the transnational progress of freedom through the antebellum cultural fascination with cross-racial relationships and insurrections. Her book mines a variety of sources—fiction, political rhetoric, popular journalism, race science, and biblical treatises—to reveal a common concern: a future in which romance and rebellion engender radical social and political transformation.

Eclipse of Empires

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Eclipse of Empires

Eclipse of Empires

World History in Nineteenth-Century U.S. Literature and Culture

  • Author: Patricia Jane Roylance
  • Publisher: University of Alabama Press
  • ISBN: 0817313826
  • Category: History
  • Page: 225
  • View: 6661
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Eclipse of Empires analyzes the nineteenth-century American fascination with what Patricia Jane Roylance calls “narratives of imperial eclipse,” texts that depict the surpassing of one great civilization by another. Patricia Jane Roylance’s central claim in Eclipse of Empires is that historical episodes of imperial eclipse, for example Incan Peru yielding to Spain or the Ojibway to the French, heightened the concerns of many American writers about specific intranational social problems plaguing the nation at the time—race, class, gender, religion, economics. Given the eventual dissolution of great civilizations previously plagued by these very same problems, many writers, unlike those who confidently emphasized U.S. exceptionalism, exhibited both an anxiety about the stability of American society and a consistent practice of self-scrutiny in identifying the national defects that they felt could precipitate America’s decline. Roylance studies, among other texts, James Fenimore Cooper’s The Water-Witch (1830) and The Bravo (1831), which address the eclipse of Venice by New York City as a maritime power in the eighteenth century; William Hickling Prescott’s Conquest of Peru (1847), which responds to widespread anxiety about communist and abolitionist threats to the U.S. system of personal property by depicting Incan culture as a protocommunist society doomed to failure; and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow’s The Song of Hiawatha (1855), which resists the total eclipse of Ojibwa culture by incorporating Ojibway terms and stories into his poem and by depicting the land as permanently marked by their occupation.