Search results for: food-insecurity-on-campus

Food Insecurity on Campus

Author : Katharine M. Broton
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Crutchfield, James Dubick, Amy Ellen Duke-Benfield, Sara Goldrick-Rab, Jordan Herrera, Nicole Hindes, Russell Lowery-Hart, Jennifer J. Maguire, Michael Rosen, Sabrina Sanders, Rachel Sumekh

Experiences of Hunger and Food Insecurity in College

Author : Lisa Henry
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This volume explores the experience of hunger and food insecurity among college students at a large, public university in north Texas. Ninety-two clients of the campus food pantry volunteered to share their experiences through qualitative interviews, allowing the author to develop seven profiles of food insecurity, while at once exploring the impact of childhood food insecurity and various coping strategies. Students highlighted the issues of stigma and shame; the unwillingness to discuss food insecurity with their peers; the physical consequences of hunger and poor nutrition; the associations between mental health and nutrition; the academic sacrifices and motivations to finish their degree in the light of food insecurity; and the potential for raising awareness on campus through university engagement. Henry concludes the book with a discussion of solutions—existing solutions to alleviate food insecurity, student-led suggestions for additional resources, solutions in place at other universities that serve as potential models for similar campuses—and efforts to change federal policy.

Books Or Food

Author : Sonya Sharififard
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This dissertation is a quantitative study of campus food pantries located in public four-year colleges and universities in the United States. The research aims to explain relationships among campus food pantries and surrounding neighborhood characteristics affecting local food environments. There are two parts to the study: (a) the quantitative analysis through responses from a participant questionnaire; and (b) a case study analysis to accompany the quantitative analysis. The researcher identified three metropolitan counties within U.S. census tracts, to determine the relationship between neighborhood demographics, the local food environment, and the impact on campus communities. The researcher explored food accessibility within college or university distances. Organizational and administrative perspectives about campus food pantries and basic student needs have been conceptualized in the context of education, sociology, and anthropology, among others. The types of food available at food retailers have not been studied to understand student populations and the role of campus food pantries in higher education. This study specifically considers food pantries from an administrative point of view, and asks three different research questions: 1. What are the most significant factors contributing to the growth of campus food pantries? 2. To what extent have food pantries on college campuses helped to alleviate food insecurity among students? 3. What are the ways in which college food pantries have improved the dietary needs of student populations? The researcher suggests that an increase in the types of food stores in neighborhoods, such as convenience stores, can limit the types of food items available in the community and on college and university campuses. The researcher also suggests that a variety of food stores are needed to serve the diverse student populations enrolled at colleges and universities. Finally, this study provides recommendations for advancing student success and integrating campus food pantry services with academic success.

Food Insecurity Among Midwestern University Students Living Off Campus

Author : Amy Illovsky
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The purpose of this study was to identify the level of food insecurity among midwestern university students living off-campus to determine if there is a future need for an intervention, such as a campus food pantry. The study aimed to answer two main questions: (1) What is the prevalence of food insecurity in students living off-campus? and (2) Which variables are associated with food insecurity? A sample was drawn from university students who consented to filling out an online anonymous survey. Food security status was determined by utilizing the USDA US Adult Food Security Survey Module. Information on other variables possibly related to food insecurity were also gathered from this survey. The results showed that food assistance status, ethnicity, and debt/loans had a statistically significant relationship with food security status. The prevalence of food insecurity among the midwestern university students in this sample was 41%, which is above the national average. Food insecurity among midwestern university students is a critical issue that needs intervention.

The Acceptability and Feasibility of an On campus Food Pantry to Address Student Food Insecurity

Author : Ellie Kim
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Although past literature has examined the prevalence of campus food pantries, most have not examined student satisfaction of campus food pantries the acceptability and feasibility of the campus food pantries in the U.S. This descriptive and quasi-experimental study assessed the acceptability and feasibility of campus food pantry intervention on two campuses (Downtown Phoenix and Tempe) at Arizona State University (ASU). The acceptability measures were composed of 30 survey questions including demographics, satisfaction survey, and food insecurity questionnaires, which were abstracted from the U.S. Adult 10-Item Food Security Survey Module. The food pantry was open once a week at each site. Any ASU students who enrolled in Spring 2017 and visited a food pantry were eligible to participate in the study. A total of 39 ASU students participated in the study during January 2017 and February 2017 (48.1 % female, 42.3 % White). The number of surveys collected at each site was 52. The majority of students were first-year undergraduate students (57.9% Downtown Phoenix, 45.5% Tempe). Based on their answers to the U.S. Adult 10-Item Food Security Survey Module, 21.2% of students (n=11) indicated low food security, while 48.1% of students (n=25) indicated very low food security. Almost 70% of pantry users reported that they have experienced food insecurity. In this study, the majority (90%) of students were satisfied with the service, hours of operation, and location for both the Downtown and Tempe food pantries. Additionally, 85.7% of students reported that they need additional resources such as financial aid (49%), a career center (18.4%), health services (10.2%), and other services (8.2%). The Pitchfork Pantry operated by student, university, and community support. Total donations received between Fall 2016 and Spring 2017 were 4,600 food items. The study found that most students were highly satisfied with the campus food pantries and it was feasible to operate two pantries on the ASU campus. These findings can be used to contribute to future research into campus food pantries, which may be the solution for food insecurity intervention among college populations.

Emerging Topics in Food Insecurity An Assessment of University Student Food Access and Urban Agriculture in Los Angeles

Author : Tyler Doyal Watson
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Food insecurity, defined as an uncertain or limited ability to get adequate food due to lack of financial resources, is a persistent issue in the City of Los Angeles. Traditional food assistance programs are underutilized and inadequate, and some populations who experience food insecurity have been overlooked in survey efforts. The work presented here investigates two emerging topics in food insecurity: food insecurity among college students and the potential for urban agriculture to address food insecurity in Los Angeles. First, focus group interviews were conducted with a diverse sample of 82 college students at the University of California, Los Angeles to explore student experiences, perceptions, and concerns related to food insecurity. We found that food insecurity is an invisible issue on campus that carries stigma, and the cost of attendance is a challenge for many students. Students who experienced food insecurity reported negative academic impacts, mental and physical health consequences, and disaffection from the university. In general, students wanted a greater awareness around food insecurity and food resources, and opportunities to learn life skills including cooking and budgeting. Second, a geospatial analysis was conducted to assess the extent of urban agriculture (UA) in the City of Los Angeles and theoretical vegetable production was calculated for city vacant land. While UA could not meet the need for the entire population, it could theoretically meet the need of the food insecure population. UA is unevenly distributed across the city. High need areas of the city do appear to be alleviated by the presence of UA sites, but generally have less vacant land for future UA sites. A recent tax incentive program may help increase the number of UA sites in the city. Third, current UA policy and planning was reviewed in the City of Los Angeles including a document analysis of three recent city plans. In general, Los Angeles is behind other cities in its support of UA, but has made substantial progress in recent years. Key recommendations include updating zoning, implementing a public land leasing program, subsidizing water rates, creating a city-wide UA network, and collecting additional UA data.

Farm based Food Access

Author : Marisa Ann Coyne
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Food insecurity on college and university campuses, or reduced quality, variety, or desirability of diet with or without hunger, is a topic of interest and concern amongst administrators, families, students, and faculty. Recent research in the state of California indicates that 42% of University of California (UC) students experience some measure of food insecurity, compared with 14% of US households. As in the general population, college Students of Color along with low-income and LGBTQIA+ students experience greater rates of food insecurity than the general population. UC administrators have enlisted Student Farms and on-campus agricultural projects as collaborators on food assistance and food systems education projects. This research documents the development of the Community Table Project (CTP), a farm-based food access project located on the UC Davis (UCD) campus. CTP explores ways in which the SF can address campus food insecurity (through produce donation) and contribute to dialogue at the intersections of people, place, and food (through collaborations with academic departments and student organizations). A summary of program outcomes is informed by interviews with key stakeholders, produce data analysis, and participant observation. I assess program efficacy against goals identified by the UC Food Security Model described in the conclusion to the Global Food Initiative’s (GFI) 2016 Student Food Access and Security study. Results demonstrate that the UCD SF rapidly scaled produce donations to campus distribution partners from 700 lbs. to 10,000 lbs. annually. In addition, CTP provided farm visits 380 students in academic departments not previously engaged in land-based learning. This research indicates that Student Farms and campus agricultural projects are unique and appropriate partners in work intended to address college and university student food insecurity because of their dual emergency food relief and educational foci. The UCD SF directly responds to GFI food access and security objectives by increasing the quantity of free produce on campus, stimulating food systems student leadership, connecting campus efforts to regional efforts, and assembling and increasing awareness about campus food security resources.

Hunger and Food Insecurity in California

Author : Linda Neuhauser
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Food is a Right

Author : Esperanza Monica Aceves
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Abstract: The problem of food insecurity among students in higher education, specifically students who belong to historically marginalized populations, is a serious national problem that is under researched. While data are not being collected universally, higher education institutions are beginning to report on this issue. Research reflects that 1 in 5 California State University students is experiencing chronic food insecurity and 1 in 10 is reporting experiences of homelessness. Higher education colleges are beginning to address this problem by casting a net of resources like food pantries, meal donations on student cards from other students, emergency funds through grants, CalFresh outreach and enrollment (federally funded program known as Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program), and other campus-unique programming to serve hard-to-reach, vulnerable students. This study explores such services at a public California State University-Hispanic Serving Institution with the goal of understanding students’ lived experiences related to accessibility of food programming and resources in higher education. By exploring the perceptions of four students that are female who were food insecure related to their utilization of food programs directed at ensuring student food security, this study intends: (1) to explore students’ satisfaction with campus food programming, (2) to describe the participants’ knowledge of campus food programs and healthy food options, and (3) to explore the relationship between food programming and policies and the lived experiences of students. This study is important because oftentimes research is missing the unheard voices of students. By embracing students’ stories, researchers can learn of their real-life experiences. This allows for a greater understanding of the significance of food insecurity and its impact on students using food programs in higher education settings.

Oregon s Agricultural Progress

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Human Ecology

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Impact

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Sustainable Agriculture

Author :
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Development Implementation and Maintenance of Dedicated Responses to Food Insecurity at Institutions of Higher Education

Author : Margaret Serritella Tennant
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At institutions of higher education across the country, since the economic downturn of 2008, student affairs professionals have been hearing anecdotal evidence that students are hungry. In 2009, Chaparro, Zaghloul, Holck, and Dobbs conducted one of the first studies on food insecurity in higher education and found that there was a need to create a dedicated response to the problem. Cady (2014) noted that while data on food insecurity is scarce, based on the campus food bank movement, it is a salient concern in higher education. This multi-site case study was designed to elicit knowledge associated with developing, implementing, and maintaining dedicated responses focused on alleviating food insecurity at institutions of higher education. This qualitative study was conducted at three sites: a private research university in the nation's capital, a Hispanic-serving institution in the south central United States, and an independent liberal arts college in the northwest United States. The purpose of this study is to provide a qualitative understanding of how institutions of higher education develop, implement, and maintain dedicated responses focused on alleviating food insecurity so that the results can be used by other institutions. The case study was designed to identify barriers and opportunities involved in designing campus-based dedicated responses to food insecurity. For this multi-site case study, experiences of professionals were explored through semi-structured interviews based on the work of the College and University Food Bank Alliance (CUFBA) (2017); through reviewing relevant documents such as policies, processes, procedures, and marketing; and through a photo representation project that allowed the researcher to visually observe each of the dedicated responses (Bignante, 2010; Johnson & Christensen, 2014). For each of the sites, the primary response was the establishment of a campus food pantry. In an effort to identify the emergence of both potential common themes or patterns and differences from the data there was a review of the interview transcripts and researcher notes as well as of the documents and photos provided. Findings were aligned with CUFBA recommendations and reflected the importance of documenting campus need, establishing a steering committee, identifying appropriate space, creating strong partnerships, developing effective operational strategies, and focusing on sustainability through marketing and fundraising. Recommendations for practice are included.

The Official GRE CGS Directory of Graduate Programs

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Food Management

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Who Cares for Our Children

Author : Valerie Polakow
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Lack of access to affordable high-quality child care is frequently the tipping point that catapults a family into poverty, joblessness, and homelessness—a constant threat to the well-being of women and children. Polakow spent a year traveling around the country listening to low-income women from diverse backgrounds tell their stories of struggle, resilience, distress, and occasional success as they encountered ongoing child care crises. The resulting work is both a compelling account of the lived realities of the child care crisis, and an incisive critique of public policy that points to the United States as an outlier in the international community. Drawing on historical and international perspectives, Polakow creates a groundbreaking analysis of child care as a human right, persuasively arguing for a universal child care system. Among the provocative issues the book addresses are: Child care as a private or public responsibility The segregated history of child care Poor children and the child care nightmare Working-poor mothers and their deficit of choices “Woman-friendly” policies in international context Recommendations for universal child care Child Care as a human right

DNS Alert

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The Cultivar

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Effects of Student Nutrition on Academic Performance

Author : Anna Malki
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This research looks as the influence student nutrition has on academic performance. More specifically, how food insecurity, and school food consumption impacts grade point average. The data for the research was collected from an in person survey and an online student database. The data was then synthesized together, creating one holistic database. From that database I was able to them run an ordinary least square regression analysis. The findings revealed that for each increment a student got closer to being food insecure on the survey, their grade point average went down by.12 points. Additionally, students that are consuming two meals a day at school, breakfast and lunch, have grade point average that is .139 points lower than students who don't, and students who feel it is important to choose healthy food have a grade point average that is .629 points higher than students that don't. The conclusions of this research defines that educators need a better system to access more nutritious food on campus. Through new policy and program implementation, educators can eliminate the lack of nutrition as a hindrance in academics.