Search results for: crime-and-human-rights

Crime and Human Rights

Author : Joachim Savelsberg
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Crimes against humanity are amongst the most shocking violations imaginable. Savelsberg's text provides a much-needed criminological insight to the topic, exploring explanations of and responses to human rights abuses. Linking human rights scholarship with criminological theory, the book is divided into three parts: Part 1: Examines the legal and historical approach to the topic within a criminological framework Part 2: Unpicks the aetiology of human rights offending with real and detailed case studies Part 3: Explores institutional responses to crimes and uses criminological theory to offer solutions. Seminal yet concise, Crime and Human Rights is written for advanced students, postgraduates and scholars of crime, crime control and human rights. With its fresh and original approach to a complex topic, the book's appeal will span across disciplines from politics and sociology to development studies, law, and philosophy. Compact Criminology is an exciting series that invigorates and challenges the international field of criminology. Books in the series are short, authoritative, innovative assessments of emerging issues in criminology and criminal justice – offering critical, accessible introductions to important topics. They take a global rather than a narrowly national approach. Eminently readable and first-rate in quality, each book is written by a leading specialist. Compact Criminology provides a new type of tool for teaching, learning and research, one that is flexible and light on its feet. The series addresses fundamental needs in the growing and increasingly differentiated field of criminology.

Crime Justice and Human Rights

Author : Leanne Weber
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Crime, Justice and Human Rights is an introduction to the philosophy, law and politics of human rights, uniquely tailored to criminologists and criminal justice practitioners. Integrating human rights and criminological frameworks across a range of subject areas – from criminalization and state crime, to crime prevention and critical analyses of the operation of the police, courts and penal system – the authors highlight both the potential and the limitations of human rights in informing new directions in criminology. Featuring case material from Europe, North America, Australia and beyond, this critical, multidisciplinary text supports the teaching of human rights across a wide range of criminological topics, and assists students, researchers and independent readers to incorporate human rights paradigms into their criminological analysis.

Gender and Crime

Author : Marisa Silvestri
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This book is a comprehensive and critical introduction to the field of gender and crime, re-thinking the key themes and debates within a human rights framework. Integrating empirical, theoretical and policy-related material, this Second Edition has been significantly updated, and now includes; Full consideration of the 2010-2015 Coalition Government and its effect on gender and crime within England and Wales A new chapter relating criminological theory to gender and crime A new chapter discussing the history of gender and crime A new chapter analysing contemporary issues in gender and crime in a globalised world Fully updated learning features including; Chapter Overviews, Key Words, Study Questions, Chapter Summaries, Key Further Readings and a Glossary. Gender and Crime: A Human Rights Approach is essential reading for students studying criminology, sociology, social policy and gender studies.

Gender and Crime

Author : Marisa Silvestri
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This text provides a much-needed, comprehensive critical introduction to debates about the relationship between gender and crime. Bringing together both feminist and masculinist perspectives, the book is a 'one stop shop' for gaining knowledge and understanding of the field of gender and crime as a whole. In addition to offering an overview of key themes and issues, Silvestri and Crowther-Dowey breathe new life into existing and well-rehearsed debates by considering the usefulness of drawing on a human rights discourse for making sense of gender, crime and criminal justice. In re-thinking the experiences of women and men as offenders, victims and criminal justice professionals within a human rights framework, the authors encourage a fresh approach to traditional debates about gender and crime. The book integrates empirical, theoretical and policy-related materials in order to encourage a thorough understanding of the field. Complex ideas and debates are grounded with reference to real life examples. The learning process is supported through the use of chapter overviews, key terms, study questions and suggestions for further reading. Gender and Crime is essential reading for students and academics in criminology, sociology, social policy and gender studies. The Key Approaches to Criminology series celebrates the removal of traditional barriers between disciplines and, specifically, reflects criminology’s interdisciplinary nature and focus. It brings together some of the leading scholars working at the intersections of criminology and related subjects. Each book in the series helps readers to make intellectual connections between criminology and other discourses, and to understand the importance of studying crime and criminal justice within the context of broader debates. The series is intended to have appeal across the entire range of undergraduate and postgraduate studies and beyond, comprising books which offer introductions to the fields as well as advancing ideas and knowledge in their subject areas.

War Crimes and Human Rights

Author : William Schabas
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This is a collection of essays and articles on human rights law and international criminal law authored by William Schabas, one of the most prominent contemporary scholars and practitioners. Particular attention is given to such topics as the limitation and abolition of the death penalty, genocide and crimes against humanity, the establishment and operation of the International Criminal Court and the ad hoc international criminal tribunals, truth and reconciliation commissions, reservations to human rights treaties, and the implementation of international human rights norms in domestic law

International Prosecution of Human Rights Crimes

Author : Wolfgang Kaleck
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The book explores recent developments in the international and national prosecution of persons accused of committing war crimes and crimes against humanity. It considers the relationship between national and international law, science and practice, with emphasis on the emerging principle of universial jurisdiction and the effect of "the war on terror" on legal norms.

Criminology

Author : John F. Galliher
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Human Rights and Criminal Justice

Author : Ben Emmerson
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This work provides a full and systematic analysis of the impact of UK human rights law on both the substantive criminal law and criminal procedure. It examines first the applicable human rights principles before moving on to consider their impact on specific areas, including the investigation of crime, court procedure, and sentencing.

The Protection of Human Rights in African Criminal Proceedings

Author : M. Cherif Bassiouni
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Preface.

Human Rights in the Investigation and Prosecution of Crime

Author : Madeleine Colvin
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This new book is partly based on an earlier book, Criminal Justice, Police Powers and Human Rights (Blackstone's, 2001), which was published immediately after the Human Rights Act came into force. The subsequent developments in the criminal justice/human rights field have been so numerous, that a new dedicated text on the subject is required as opposed to just a new edition of the authors' previous book. This new book provides a detailed and practical analysis of the impact of UK human rights law on the investigation and prosecution of crime. It deals systematically with the various stages of investigation, arrest and detention in police custody, court procedure, evidence, sentencing, and appeals. The narrative provides a comprehensive, in-depth examination of the Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act (RIPA), looking in detail at the relationship between human rights and police investigatory and surveillance powers. The book is aimed directly at practitioners, and is logically divided into chapters dealing with a particular aspect of human rights in relation to the criminal process, including; the interception of communications and surveillance and intelligence issues; arrest and detention; bail; disclosure; mental health and capacity; sentencing; the rights of victims; extradition; and proceeds of crime.

Legal Studies

Author : Mohan Dhall
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Criminal Theory and International Human Rights Law

Author : Steven Malby
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The development of an international human rights jurisprudence on criminalization is in its relative infancy. Nonetheless, systematic examination of international decisions on acts engaging the criminal law reveals an emerging human rights approach to the acceptability, or not, of criminalization. This book provides an in-depth characterization of the reasoning and principles that underpin those decisions. The work builds upon and adds value to existing literature by bringing together two fields of study - international human rights law and criminal theory - that usually receive separate treatment. It provides an in-depth analysis of human rights criminalization jurisprudence and presents a systematic identification of underlying reasoning and concepts that influence international human rights decisions on criminalization. The work thus advances both fields independently, as well as providing an example of inter-(sub)disciplinary analysis. The book will be a valuable resource for academics and students working in the areas of International Human Rights Law, Criminal Law, and Moral Philosophy.

Criminal Punishment and Human Rights Convenient Morality

Author : Adnan Sattar
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This book examines the relationship between international human rights discourse and the justifi cations for criminal punishment. Using interdisciplinary discourse analysis, it exposes certain paradoxes that underpin the ‘International Bill of Human Rights’, academic commentaries on human rights law, and the global human rights monitoring regime in relation to the aims of punishment in domestic penal systems. It argues that human rights discourse, owing to its theoretical kinship with Kantian philosophy, embodies a paradoxical commitment to human dignity on the one hand, and retributive punishment on the other. Further, it sustains the split between criminal justice and social justice, which results in a sociologically ill-informed understanding of punishment. Human rights discourse plays a paradoxical role vis-à-vis the punitive power of the state as it seeks to counter criminalisation in some areas and backs the introduction of new criminal offences – and longer prison sentences – in others. The underlying priorities, it is argued, have been shaped by a number of historical circumstances. Drawing on archival material, the study demonstrates that the international penal discourse produced during the late nineteenth and early twentieth century laid greater emphasis on offender rehabilitation and was more attentive to the social context of crime than is the case with the modern human rights discourse.

Crime Prevention and Justice in 2030

Author : Helmut Kury
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This book analyzes human rights and crime prevention challenges from the perspective of the 1948 Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the 2030 United Nations Sustainable Development Agenda, in particular its goal 16 on promoting peaceful, inclusive and just societies, the creation and development of which depend on the interplay between various secular and non-secular (f)actors. The book reflects on the implementation of these two legal instruments from a “back to the future” standpoint, that is, drawing on the wisdom of contributors to the 2030 Agenda from the past and present in order to offer a constructive inter-disciplinary and intergenerational approach. The book’s intended readership includes academics and educationists, criminal justice practitioners and experts, diplomats, spiritual leaders and non-governmental actors; its goal is to encourage them to pursue a socially and human rights oriented drive for “larger freedom,” which is currently jeopardized by adverse political currents.

Human Rights Serious Crime and Criminal Procedure

Author : Andrew Ashworth
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Criminal Evidence and Human Rights

Author : Paul Roberts
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Criminal procedure in the common law world is being recast in the image of human rights. The cumulative impact of human rights laws, both international and domestic, presages a revolution in common law procedural traditions. Comprising 16 essays plus the editors' thematic introduction, this volume explores various aspects of the 'human rights revolution' in criminal evidence and procedure in Australia, Canada, England and Wales, Hong Kong, Malaysia, New Zealand, Northern Ireland, the Republic of Ireland, Singapore, Scotland, South Africa and the USA. The contributors provide expert evaluations of their own domestic law and practice with frequent reference to comparative experiences in other jurisdictions. Some essays focus on specific topics, such as evidence obtained by torture, the presumption of innocence, hearsay, the privilege against self-incrimination, and 'rape shield' laws. Others seek to draw more general lessons about the context of law reform, the epistemic demands of the right to a fair trial, the domestic impact of supra-national legal standards (especially the ECHR), and the scope for reimagining common law procedures through the medium of human rights. This edited collection showcases the latest theoretically informed, methodologically astute and doctrinally rigorous scholarship in criminal procedure and evidence, human rights and comparative law, and will be a major addition to the literature in all of these fields.

The Criminal Process and Human Rights

Author : Mireille Delmas-Marty
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The title of this work illustrates the two difficulties which the chosen theme poses, difficulties which arise from the confrontation between collective and individual interests. On the one hand, the criminal process is based on the protection of society; on the other hand, human rights implies respect for all individuals implicated in that process, be they victim, witness or accused. A third difficulty arises in relation to the new influence of European law. While the right to judge has long appeared to be the most obvious indication of national sovereignty, it is now subject to supranational control and a State can be censured by the European Court of Human Rights. Part One of this volume analyses the period of reform in various Eastern and Western European countries; Part Two explores the debate among jurists, historians, sociologists and philosophers on the subject of the criminal trial in a democratic society. Finally, Part Three reflects on the issue within the context of the European Community and the European Council and explores the question of a future model for the European criminal trial. Professor "Mireille Delmas-Marty" teaches at l'Universite de Paris I - Pantheon Sorbonne and is a member of l'Institut Universitaire de France. She is the editor of "The European Convention" "for the Protection of Human Rights, International Protection versus" "National Restrictions" (Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, 1992.)

Introduction to International Criminal Law

Author : Curtis F. J. Doebbler
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Human Rights and Policing

Author : Ralph Crawshaw
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This is a second, thoroughly revised and expanded edition of a book that has four clear objectives: to provide a concise account and analysis of international human rights and humanitarian law standards relevant to policing; to set out arguments for compliance with those standards; to show how they may be met in two key areas of policing, interviewing suspects of crime, and policing in times of armed conflict, disturbance and tension; and to make practical recommendations on the management of police agencies.

China and International Human Rights

Author : Na Jiang
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This book is designed to introduce law students, legal actors and human rights activists, particularly participants in human rights dialogues with China, to the process and reality of a newly confident China’s participation in the international human rights system, albeit with inherent challenges. From an international and comparative perspective, one of the key findings of the author's research is that progress towards human rights depends more on judges than on legislators. Chinese legislators have enacted a series of reforms in order to better protect human rights. Unfortunately, these reforms have not led to greater adherence to China’s international human rights obligations in practice. The reforms failed because they have generally been misunderstood by Chinese judges, who often have a limited understanding of international human rights norms. Specifically, this book will examine how judicial misunderstandings have blocked reforms in one specific area, the use of severe punishments, based on international human rights theory and case studies and data analyses. This examination has several purposes. The first is to suggest that China ratify the ICCPR as the next step for its substantive progress in human rights and as a good preparation for its re-applying to be a member of the UN Human Right Council in the future. The second is to explain how judges could be better educated in international human rights norms so as to greatly reduce the use of severe punishments and better comply with China's human rights obligations. The third is to demonstrate how the international community could better engage with China in a manner that is more conducive to human rights improvements. The author's ultimate goal is to enhance dialogue on human rights in China between judges and the Chinese government, between Chinese judges and their foreign counterparts and between China's government and the international community. Another significant aim of this book is to clarify the controversial question of what obligations China should undertake before its ratification of the ICCPR and to re-examine trends in its developing human rights policy after standing down from the Council in late 2012. The tortuous progress of China’s criminal law and criminal justice reforms has confirmed that Chinese judges need further instruction on how to apply severe punishments in a manner consistent with international standards. Judges should be encouraged to exercise more discretion when sentencing so that penalties reflect the intent of relevant domestic laws as well as the international human rights standards enumerated in the ICCPR. In order to better educate and train judges, this book contains introductory chapters that examine the severe punishments currently available to Chinese judges from an international human rights perspective. To illustrate how Chinese justice currently falls short of international norms, this paper also examines several cases that are considered to be indicative of China’s progress towards greater respect for human rights and the rule of law. These cases demonstrate that China still has a long way to go to achieve its goals, at least before abolishing the death penalty, forced labor and torture.