Search results for: cornbread-nation-3

Cornbread Nation 3

Author : Ronni Lundy
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Published in association with the Southern Foodways Alliance, a collection of stories, poems, and essays introduces the life and foods of Appalachia, the Ozarks, and hillbilly diaspora, with contributions by Tony Earley, Michael McFee, Jean Ritchie, and others. Original.

Cornbread Nation 2

Author : Lolis Eric Elie
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Southern barbecue and barbecue traditions are the primary focus of Cornbread Nation 2, our second collection of the best of Southern food writing. "Barbecue is the closest thing we have in the United States to Europe's wines or cheeses; drive a hundred miles and the barbecue changes," writes John Shelton Reed. Indeed, no other dish is served a dozen different ways just between Memphis and Birmingham. In tribute to what Vince Staten calls "the slowest of the slow foods," contributors discuss the politics, sociology, and virtual religion of barbecue in the South, where communities are defined by what wood they burn, what sauce they make, and what they serve with barbecue. Jim Auchmutey links barbecue to the success of certain Southern politicians; Marcie Cohen Ferris looks at kosher brisket; and Robb Walsh investigates why black cooks have been omitted from the accepted histories of Texas barbecue, despite their seminal role in its development. Beyond the barbecue pit, John Martin Taylor sings the virtues of boiled peanuts, Calvin Trillin savors Cajun boudin, and Eddie Dean revisits his days driving an ice cream truck deep in the Appalachian Mountains. From barbecue to scuppernongs to popsicles, the forty-three newspaper columns, magazine pieces, poems, and essays collected here confirm that a bounty of good writing exists when it comes to good eating, Southern style.

Writing in the Kitchen

Author : David A. Davis
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Scarlett O’Hara munched on a radish and vowed never to go hungry again. Vardaman Bundren ate bananas in Faulkner’s Jefferson, and the Invisible Man dined on a sweet potato in Harlem. Although food and stories may be two of the most prominent cultural products associated with the South, the connections between them have not been thoroughly explored until now. Southern food has become the subject of increasingly self-conscious intellectual consideration. The Southern Foodways Alliance, the Southern Food and Beverage Museum, food-themed issues of Oxford American and Southern Cultures, and a spate of new scholarly and popular books demonstrate this interest. Writing in the Kitchen explores the relationship between food and literature and makes a major contribution to the study of both southern literature and of southern foodways and culture more widely. This collection examines food writing in a range of literary expressions, including cookbooks, agricultural journals, novels, stories, and poems. Contributors interpret how authors use food to explore the changing South, considering the ways race, ethnicity, class, gender, and region affect how and what people eat. They describe foods from specific southern places such as New Orleans and Appalachia, engage both the historical and contemporary South, and study the food traditions of ethnicities as they manifest through the written word.

Cornbread Nation 7

Author : Francis Lam
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How does Southern food look from the outside? The form is caught in constantly dueling stereotypes: It's so often imagined as either the touchingly down-home feast or the heartstopping health scourge of a nation. But as any Southern transplant will tell you once they've spent time in the region, Southerners share their lives in food, with a complex mix of stories of belonging and not belonging and of traditions that form identities of many kinds. Cornbread Nation 7, edited by Francis Lam, brings together the best Southern food writing from recent years, including well-known food writers such as Sara Roahen and Brett Anderson, a couple of classic writers such as Langston Hughes, and some newcomers. The collection, divided into five sections (“Come In and Stay Awhile,” “Provisions and Providers,” “Five Ways of Looking at Southern Food,” “The South, Stepping Out,” and “Southerners Going Home”), tells the stories both of Southerners as they move through the world and of those who ended up in the South. It explores from where and from whom food comes, and it looks at what food means to culture and how it relates to home.

Moon Nashville

Author : Margaret Littman
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Move to the beat and savor the unique creative energy of Music City. From hot Southern food to warm Southern hospitality, you can experience it all with Moon Nashville. Explore the City: Navigate by neighborhood or by activity with color-coded maps, or follow one of our guided neighborhood walks See the Sites: Visit the Grand Ole Opry, Tennessee State Capitol, and Country Music Hall of Fame, or pay respects to the King on a day trip to Graceland. Stroll the Vanderbilt campus, shop for vintage records and a well-worn pair of cowboy boots, and go honky-tonking late into the night Get a Taste of the City: Sample authentic hot chicken, dine at a classic cafeteria-style meat-and-three, or find your new favorite food truck Bars and Nightlife: Tap your foot to some live music at the Bluebird Café or pull up a barstool for a flight of classic Tennessee whiskeys. Get inspired by up-and-coming singers in The Basement before finding your voice at Lonnie's Western Room karaoke, or try a free dance lesson at Wildhorse Saloon Local Advice from Nashvillian Margaret Littman Flexible, strategic itineraries including a two-day tour, a foodie weekend, and "Music City Without Moola," plus day trips like Land Between the Lakes, Bell Buckle, and the Jack Daniels Distillery in Lynchburg Tips for Travelers including where to stay, how to safely cycle the city, and more, plus advice for LGBTQ visitors, international travelers, and families with children Maps and Tools like background information on the history and culture of Nashville, easy-to-read maps, full-color photos, and neighborhood guides from Midtown to Music Valley With Moon Nashville's practical tips and local know-how, you can plan your trip your way. Hitting the road? Try Moon Blue Ridge Parkway Road Trip or Moon Nashville to New Orleans Road Trip. If you're heading to more of the South's best cities, try Moon Memphis or Moon Atlanta.

Cornbread Nation 6

Author : Brett Anderson
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A colorful celebration of Southern foods, Southern cooking and the people and traditions behind them gathers the best of food writing from magazines, newspapers, books and journals, with contributions by Molly O'Neill, Calvin Trillin, Michael Pollan, Kim Severson and others. Original.

Cornbread Nation 4

Author : Dale Volberg Reed
File Size : 69.36 MB
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A colorful celebration of Southern foods, Southern cooking, and the people and traditions behind them gathers the best of food writing from magazines, newspapers, books, and journals, with contributions by Rick Bragg, Molly O'Neill, Edna Lewis, Jim Ferguson, Amy Evans, Pat Conroy, Candice Dyer, and many others. Original.

Victuals

Author : Ronni Lundy
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Winner of the James Beard Foundation Book of the Year Award and Best Book, American Cooking, Victuals is an exploration of the foodways, people, and places of Appalachia. Written by Ronni Lundy, regarded as the most engaging authority on the region, Victuals guides us through the surprisingly diverse history--and vibrant present--of food in the Mountain South. Victuals explores the diverse and complex food scene of the Mountain South through recipes, stories, traditions, and innovations. Each chapter explores a specific defining food or tradition of the region--such as salt, beans, corn (and corn liquor). The essays introduce readers to their rich histories and the farmers, curers, hunters, and chefs who define the region's contemporary landscape. Sitting at a diverse intersection of cuisines, Appalachia offers a wide range of ingredients and products that can be transformed using traditional methods and contemporary applications. Through 80 recipes and stories gathered on her travels in the region, Lundy shares dishes that distill the story and flavors of the Mountain South. – Epicurious: Best Cookbooks of 2016

Moon Memphis

Author : Margaret Littman
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Travel writer and Tennessee local Margaret Littman reveals the best things Memphis has to offer, from the soul music and blues to the barbecue. Margaret provides travel strategies including the Beale Street Walking Tour and Memphis Juke Joints. Packed with information on dining, transportation and accommodations, Moon Memphis has many options for a range of travel budgets. Complete with details on where to find the best barbecue, learn about the Underground Railroad, or pay homage to The King, Moon Memphis gives travelers the tools they need to create a more personal and memorable experience.

We Eat What A Cultural Encyclopedia of Unusual Foods in the United States

Author : Jonathan Deutsch
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This entertaining and informative encyclopedia examines American regional foods, using cuisine as an engaging lens through which readers can deepen their study of American geography in addition to their understanding of America's collective cultures. • Includes dozens of recipes that students and readers can test for themselves • Highlights and thus preserves the cultural integrity of endangered regional foods • Supports learning through engagingly written entries accessible to readers of all ages • Allows readers to think critically about foods and their origins • Highlights "fun facts" about the entries, including terminology and laws, in sidebars

A Culinary History of Kentucky

Author : Fiona Young-Brown
File Size : 73.4 MB
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Pull up a chair to the kitchen table and enjoy a delicious adventure through Bluegrass food history. Kentucky's cuisine can be traced back to Cherokee, Irish, Scottish, English and German roots, among others. A typical Kentucky meal might have the standard meat and three, but there are many dishes that can't be found anywhere else. Poke sallet, despite its toxic roots and berries, is such a favorite in parts of eastern Kentucky that an annual festival celebrates it. Find recipes for dishes from burgoo to hog to moonshine and frogs. Join author Fiona Young-Brown as she details all the delectable delights sure to make the mouth water.

Saving Seeds Preserving Taste

Author : Bill Best
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The Brown Goose, the White Case Knife, Ora’s Speckled Bean, Radiator Charlie’s Mortgage Lifter — these are just a few of the heirloom fruits and vegetables you’ll encounter in Bill Best’s remarkable history of seed saving and the people who preserve both unique flavors and the Appalachian culture associated with them. As one of the people at the forefront of seed saving and trading for over fifty years, Best has helped preserve numerous varieties of beans, tomatoes, corn, squashes, and other fruits and vegetables, along with the family stories and experiences that are a fundamental part of this world. While corporate agriculture privileges a few flavorless but hardy varieties of daily vegetables, seed savers have worked tirelessly to preserve genetic diversity and the flavors rooted in the Southern Appalachian Mountains — referred to by plant scientists as one of the vegetative wonders of the world. Saving Seeds, Preserving Taste will introduce readers to the cultural traditions associated with seed saving, as well as the remarkable people who have used grafting practices and hand-by-hand trading to keep alive varieties that would otherwise have been lost. As local efforts to preserve heirloom seeds have become part of a growing national food movement, Appalachian seed savers play a crucial role in providing alternatives to large-scale agriculture and corporate food culture. Part flavor guide, part people’s history, Saving Seeds, Preserving Taste will introduce you to a world you’ve never known — or perhaps remind you of one you remember well from your childhood.

Tupelo Honey Cafe

Author : Elizabeth Sims
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“From burgoo thick with chorizo and chicken to a cocktail that sloshes with bourbon and sorghum, this book showcases innovative Appalachian food and drink.” —John T. Edge, series editor of Cornbread Nation: The Best of Southern Food Writing Tupelo Honey Cafe, now with locations throughout the Mountain South, brings fans the restaurant’s second cookbook. Tupelo Honey Cafe: New Southern Flavors from the Blue Ridge Mountains, provides a gastronomic tour of the flavors and tastes of the region considered the Mountain South—but interpreted through Tupelo’s own lexicon. From Appalachian Egg Rolls with Smoked Jalapeno Sauce, Pickled Onions and Pulled Pork to Acorn Squash Stuffed with Bacon Bread Pudding to Upsy Daisy Peach Upside-Down Cake, each recipe tells a story about the traditions, inspiration and history of the southern mountains, using the Blue Ridge Parkway, a 469-mile National Scenic By-way as a narrative jumping-off point. The result is an assembly of 125 imaginative, delicious and approachable recipes to be enjoyed by the home cook, the avid reader and book collector, and the hungry appetite alike. A foreword by Chef Sean Brock and gorgeous photos of the surrounding area and food complete this collection. “As a proud product of my beloved Blue Ridge Mountains, I am heartened by the Ode to Muddy Pond cocktail, intrigued by the Pimento Cheese Fondue, lured by Appalachian Egg Rolls, and astonished by Southern Poutine with Double Sausage Gravy . . . a beautiful cookbook that sent me running into the kitchen.” —Sheri Castle, author of Instantly Southern “Elizabeth Sims’s thoughtfully written stories and histories of the mountain South provid[e] both setting and inspiration for this distinctive American restaurant. It’s nourishment for both belly and heart.” —Ronni Lundy, James Beard Award–winning author of Victuals

Cornbread Nation 1

Author : Southern Foodways Alliance
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Presents a collection of essays that celebrate the food customs of the South from such writers as Roy Blount, Jr., Jessica Harris, and James Villas.

Culturally Responsive Methodologies

Author : Mere Berryman
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Offers new methodologies that require the researcher to develop relationships that may enable them to intimately come to respect and know the "Other" with whom they seek to study. This book is suitable for qualitative research work and therefore would be used in Research Qualitative Methods courses.

Pawpaw

Author : Andrew Moore
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The largest edible fruit native to the United States tastes like a cross between a banana and a mango. It grows wild in twenty-six states, gracing Eastern forests each fall with sweet-smelling, tropical-flavored abundance. Historically, it fed and sustained Native Americans and European explorers, presidents, and enslaved African Americans, inspiring folk songs, poetry, and scores of place names from Georgia to Illinois. Its trees are an organic grower’s dream, requiring no pesticides or herbicides to thrive, and containing compounds that are among the most potent anticancer agents yet discovered. So why have so few people heard of the pawpaw, much less tasted one? In Pawpaw—a 2016 James Beard Foundation Award nominee in the Writing & Literature category—author Andrew Moore explores the past, present, and future of this unique fruit, traveling from the Ozarks to Monticello; canoeing the lower Mississippi in search of wild fruit; drinking pawpaw beer in Durham, North Carolina; tracking down lost cultivars in Appalachian hollers; and helping out during harvest season in a Maryland orchard. Along the way, he gathers pawpaw lore and knowledge not only from the plant breeders and horticulturists working to bring pawpaws into the mainstream (including Neal Peterson, known in pawpaw circles as the fruit’s own “Johnny Pawpawseed”), but also regular folks who remember eating them in the woods as kids, but haven’t had one in over fifty years. As much as Pawpaw is a compendium of pawpaw knowledge, it also plumbs deeper questions about American foodways—how economic, biologic, and cultural forces combine, leading us to eat what we eat, and sometimes to ignore the incredible, delicious food growing all around us. If you haven’t yet eaten a pawpaw, this book won’t let you rest until you do.

The New Encyclopedia of Southern Culture

Author : John T. Edge
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When the original Encyclopedia of Southern Culture was published in 1989, the topic of foodways was relatively new as a field of scholarly inquiry. Food has always been central to southern culture, but the past twenty years have brought an explosion in interest in foodways, particularly in the South. This volume marks the first encyclopedia of the food culture of the American South, surveying the vast diversity of foodways within the region and the collective qualities that make them distinctively southern. Articles in this volume explore the richness of southern foodways, examining not only what southerners eat but also why they eat it. The volume contains 149 articles, almost all of them new to this edition of the Encyclopedia. Longer essays address the historical development of southern cuisine and ethnic contributions to the region's foodways. Topical essays explore iconic southern foods such as MoonPies and fried catfish, prominent restaurants and personalities, and the food cultures of subregions and individual cities. The volume is destined to earn a spot on kitchen shelves as well as in libraries.

A Savory History of Arkansas Delta Food Potlikker Coon Suppers Chocolate Gravy

Author : Cindy Grisham
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Up and down the Arkansas Delta, food tells a story. Whether the time Bill Clinton nearly died on the way to a coon dinner or the connections made over biscuits and gravy or the more common chicken and dumpling feuds, the area is no stranger to history. One of America's last frontiers, it was settled in the late nineteenth century by a rough-and-tumble collection of timber men, sharecroppers and entrepreneurs from all over the world who embraced the traditional foodways and added their own twists. Today, the Arkansas Delta is the nation's largest producer of rice and adds other crops like catfish and sweet potatoes. Join author Cindy Grisham for this delicious look into Delta cuisine.

The Month of Their Ripening

Author : Georgann Eubanks
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Telling the stories of twelve North Carolina heritage foods, each matched to the month of its peak readiness for eating, Georgann Eubanks takes readers on a flavorful journey across the state. She begins in January with the most ephemeral of southern ingredients—snow—to witness Tar Heels making snow cream. In March, she takes a midnight canoe ride on the Trent River in search of shad, a bony fish with a savory history. In November, she visits a Chatham County sawmill where the possums are always first into the persimmon trees. Talking with farmers, fishmongers, cooks, historians, and scientists, Eubanks looks at how foods are deeply tied to the culture of the Old North State. Some have histories that go back thousands of years. Garlicky green ramps, gathered in April and traditionally savored by many Cherokee people, are now endangered by their popularity in fine restaurants. Oysters, though, are enjoying a comeback, cultivated by entrepreneurs along the coast in December. These foods, and the stories of the people who prepare and eat them, make up the long-standing dialect of North Carolina kitchens. But we have to wait for the right moment to enjoy them, and in that waiting is their treasure.

The Edible South

Author : Marcie Cohen Ferris
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Discusses how food has shaped Southern identity, including the food slaves served in the Plantation South, how home economics and domestic science became part of the school curriculum in the South, and Southern-style food counterculture.