Search results for: computability-in-analysis-and-physics

Computability in Analysis and Physics

Author : Marian B. Pour-El
File Size : 65.26 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 677
Read : 914
Download »
Since their inception, the Perspectives in Logic and Lecture Notes in Logic series have published seminal works by leading logicians. Many of the original books in the series have been unavailable for years, but they are now in print once again. In this volume, the first publication in the Perspectives in Logic series, Pour-El and Richards present the first graduate-level treatment of computable analysis within the tradition of classical mathematical reasoning. The book focuses on the computability or noncomputability of standard processes in analysis and physics. Topics include classical analysis, Hilbert and Banach spaces, bounded and unbounded linear operators, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, and equations of mathematical physics. The work is self-contained, and although it is intended primarily for logicians and analysts, it should also be of interest to researchers and graduate students in physics and computer science.

Archaeology Under Dictatorship

Author : Michael L. Galaty
File Size : 81.95 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 369
Read : 1313
Download »
This volume provides a theoretical basis for understanding the specific effects of totalitarian dictatorship upon the practice of archaeology, both during and after the dictator's reign. The nine essays explore experiences from every corner of the Mediterranean. With its wide-range of case-studies and strong theoretical orientation, this volume is a major advance in the study of the history and politics of archaeology.

Computability in Analysis and Physics

Author : Marian B. Pour-El
File Size : 80.38 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 173
Read : 1022
Download »

Computability in Analysis and Physics

Author : Marian Boykan Pour-El
File Size : 31.24 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 756
Read : 1178
Download »
Since their inception, the Perspectives in Logic and Lecture Notes in Logic series have published seminal works by leading logicians. Many of the original books in the series have been unavailable for years, but they are now in print once again. In this volume, the first publication in the Perspectives in Logic series, Pour-El and Richards present the first graduate-level treatment of computable analysis within the tradition of classical mathematical reasoning. The book focuses on the computability or noncomputability of standard processes in analysis and physics. Topics include classical analysis, Hilbert and Banach spaces, bounded and unbounded linear operators, eigenvalues, eigenvectors, and equations of mathematical physics. The work is self-contained, and although it is intended primarily for logicians and analysts, it should also be of interest to researchers and graduate students in physics and computer science.

New Computational Paradigms

Author : S.B. Cooper
File Size : 42.21 MB
Format : PDF, Mobi
Download : 198
Read : 422
Download »
This superb exposition of a complex subject examines new developments in the theory and practice of computation from a mathematical perspective, with topics ranging from classical computability to complexity, from biocomputing to quantum computing. This book is suitable for researchers and graduate students in mathematics, philosophy, and computer science with a special interest in logic and foundational issues. Most useful to graduate students are the survey papers on computable analysis and biological computing. Logicians and theoretical physicists will also benefit from this book.

Models of Computation

Author : Maribel Fernandez
File Size : 85.22 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 338
Read : 922
Download »
A Concise Introduction to Computation Models and Computability Theory provides an introduction to the essential concepts in computability, using several models of computation, from the standard Turing Machines and Recursive Functions, to the modern computation models inspired by quantum physics. An in-depth analysis of the basic concepts underlying each model of computation is provided. Divided into two parts, the first highlights the traditional computation models used in the first studies on computability: - Automata and Turing Machines; - Recursive functions and the Lambda-Calculus; - Logic-based computation models. and the second part covers object-oriented and interaction-based models. There is also a chapter on concurrency, and a final chapter on emergent computation models inspired by quantum mechanics. At the end of each chapter there is a discussion on the use of computation models in the design of programming languages.

Computable Analysis

Author : Klaus Weihrauch
File Size : 63.60 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 674
Read : 850
Download »
Merging fundamental concepts of analysis and recursion theory to a new exciting theory, this book provides a solid fundament for studying various aspects of computability and complexity in analysis. It is the result of an introductory course given for several years and is written in a style suitable for graduate-level and senior students in computer science and mathematics. Many examples illustrate the new concepts while numerous exercises of varying difficulty extend the material and stimulate readers to work actively on the text.

Handbook of Computability and Complexity in Analysis

Author : Vasco Brattka
File Size : 58.5 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 375
Read : 180
Download »
Computable analysis is the modern theory of computability and complexity in analysis that arose out of Turing's seminal work in the 1930s. This was motivated by questions such as: which real numbers and real number functions are computable, and which mathematical tasks in analysis can be solved by algorithmic means? Nowadays this theory has many different facets that embrace topics from computability theory, algorithmic randomness, computational complexity, dynamical systems, fractals, and analog computers, up to logic, descriptive set theory, constructivism, and reverse mathematics. In recent decades computable analysis has invaded many branches of analysis, and researchers have studied computability and complexity questions arising from real and complex analysis, functional analysis, and the theory of differential equations, up to (geometric) measure theory and topology. This handbook represents the first coherent cross-section through most active research topics on the more theoretical side of the field. It contains 11 chapters grouped into parts on computability in analysis; complexity, dynamics, and randomness; and constructivity, logic, and descriptive complexity. All chapters are written by leading experts working at the cutting edge of the respective topic. Researchers and graduate students in the areas of theoretical computer science and mathematical logic will find systematic introductions into many branches of computable analysis, and a wealth of information and references that will help them to navigate the modern research literature in this field.

Randomness Undecidability in Physics

Author : Karl Svozil
File Size : 80.57 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 431
Read : 810
Download »
Recent findings in the computer sciences, discrete mathematics, formal logics and metamathematics have opened up a royal road for the investigation of undecidability and randomness in physics. A translation of these formal concepts yields a fresh look into diverse features of physical modelling such as quantum complementarity and the measurement problem, but also stipulates questions related to the necessity of the assumption of continua.Conversely, any computer may be perceived as a physical system: not only in the immediate sense of the physical properties of its hardware. Computers are a medium to virtual realities. The foreseeable importance of such virtual realities stimulates the investigation of an ?inner description?, a ?virtual physics? of these universes of computation. Indeed, one may consider our own universe as just one particular realisation of an enormous number of virtual realities, most of them awaiting discovery.One motive of this book is the recognition that what is often referred to as ?randomness? in physics might actually be a signature of undecidability for systems whose evolution is computable on a step-by-step basis. To give a flavour of the type of questions envisaged: Consider an arbitrary algorithmic system which is computable on a step-by-step basis. Then it is in general impossible to specify a second algorithmic procedure, including itself, which, by experimental input-output analysis, is capable of finding the deterministic law of the first system. But even if such a law is specified beforehand, it is in general impossible to predict the system behaviour in the ?distant future?. In other words: no ?speedup? or ?computational shortcut? is available. In this approach, classical paradoxes can be formally translated into no-go theorems concerning intrinsic physical perception.It is suggested that complementarity can be modelled by experiments on finite automata, where measurements of one observable of the automaton destroys the possibility to measure another observable of the same automaton and it vice versa.Besides undecidability, a great part of the book is dedicated to a formal definition of randomness and entropy measures based on algorithmic information theory.

Computability on Open and Closed Subsets of Euclidean Space

Author : Qing Zhou
File Size : 39.56 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 370
Read : 410
Download »

Computability and Complexity in Analysis

Author : Jens Blanck
File Size : 42.28 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 157
Read : 1215
Download »
The workshop on Computability and Complexity in Analysis, CCA 2000, was hosted by the Department of Computer Science of the University of Wales Swansea, September 17{19, 2000. It was the fourth workshop in a successful series of workshops: CCA’95 in Hagen, Germany, CCA’96 in Trier, Germany, and CCA’98 in Brno, Czech Republic. About 40 participants from the countries United Kingdom, Germany, Japan, Italy, Russia, France, Denmark, Greece, and Ireland contributed to the success of this meeting. Altogether, 28 talkswere p- sented in Swansea. These proceedings include 23 papers which represent a cro- section through recent research on computability and complexity in analysis. The workshop succeeded in bringing together people interested in computability and complexity aspects of analysis and in exploring connections with nume- cal methods, physics and, of course, computer science. It was rounded o by a number of talks and papers on exact computer arithmetic and by a competition of v e implemented systems. A report on this competition has been included in these proceedings. We would like to thank the authors for their contributions and the referees for their careful work, and we hope for further inspiring and constructive meetings of the same kind. April 2001 Jens Blanck Vasco Brattka Peter Hertling Organization CCA2000was hosted by the Department of Computer Science of the University of Wales Swansea and took place on September 17{19, 2000.

Models of Computation

Author : Maribel Fernández
File Size : 58.53 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 966
Read : 188
Download »
A Concise Introduction to Computation Models and Computability Theory provides an introduction to the essential concepts in computability, using several models of computation, from the standard Turing Machines and Recursive Functions, to the modern computation models inspired by quantum physics. An in-depth analysis of the basic concepts underlying each model of computation is provided. Divided into two parts, the first highlights the traditional computation models used in the first studies on computability: - Automata and Turing Machines; - Recursive functions and the Lambda-Calculus; - Logic-based computation models. and the second part covers object-oriented and interaction-based models. There is also a chapter on concurrency, and a final chapter on emergent computation models inspired by quantum mechanics. At the end of each chapter there is a discussion on the use of computation models in the design of programming languages.

Randomness and Undecidability in Physics

Author : K Svozil
File Size : 86.10 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 117
Read : 170
Download »
Recent findings in the computer sciences, discrete mathematics, formal logics and metamathematics have opened up a royal road for the investigation of undecidability and randomness in physics. A translation of these formal concepts yields a fresh look into diverse features of physical modelling such as quantum complementarity and the measurement problem, but also stipulates questions related to the necessity of the assumption of continua. Conversely, any computer may be perceived as a physical system: not only in the immediate sense of the physical properties of its hardware. Computers are a medium to virtual realities. The foreseeable importance of such virtual realities stimulates the investigation of an “inner description”, a “virtual physics” of these universes of computation. Indeed, one may consider our own universe as just one particular realisation of an enormous number of virtual realities, most of them awaiting discovery. One motive of this book is the recognition that what is often referred to as “randomness” in physics might actually be a signature of undecidability for systems whose evolution is computable on a step-by-step basis. To give a flavour of the type of questions envisaged: Consider an arbitrary algorithmic system which is computable on a step-by-step basis. Then it is in general impossible to specify a second algorithmic procedure, including itself, which, by experimental input-output analysis, is capable of finding the deterministic law of the first system. But even if such a law is specified beforehand, it is in general impossible to predict the system behaviour in the “distant future”. In other words: no “speedup” or “computational shortcut” is available. In this approach, classical paradoxes can be formally translated into no-go theorems concerning intrinsic physical perception. It is suggested that complementarity can be modelled by experiments on finite automata, where measurements of one observable of the automaton destroys the possibility to measure another observable of the same automaton and it vice versa. Besides undecidability, a great part of the book is dedicated to a formal definition of randomness and entropy measures based on algorithmic information theory. Contents:Algorithmic Physics: The Universe as a ComputerAlgorithmics and Recursive Function TheoryMechanism and DeterminismDiscrete PhysicsSource CodingLattice TheoryExtrinsic-Intrinsic ConceptAlgorithmic InformationComputational ComplexityUndecidabilityClassical ResultsComplementarityExtrinsic IndeterminismIntrinsic IndeterminismWeak Physical ChaosRandomnessRandomness in MathematicsRandom Fractals and 1/f NoiseChaotic Systems are Optimal Analogues of ThemselvesQuantum ChaosAlgorithmic EntropyEpilogue: Afterthoughts, Speculations and Metaphysics Readership: Physicists, computer scientists and mathematicians. keywords:Undecidability;Randomness;Algorithmic Information Theory;Automaton Logic;Quantum Logic;Recursive Function Theory;Discrete Physics;Lattice Theory;Intrinsic Perception;Halting ProblemCristian Calude

Higher Order Computability

Author : John Longley
File Size : 35.56 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 417
Read : 1248
Download »
This book offers a self-contained exposition of the theory of computability in a higher-order context, where 'computable operations' may themselves be passed as arguments to other computable operations. The subject originated in the 1950s with the work of Kleene, Kreisel and others, and has since expanded in many different directions under the influence of workers from both mathematical logic and computer science. The ideas of higher-order computability have proved valuable both for elucidating the constructive content of logical systems, and for investigating the expressive power of various higher-order programming languages. In contrast to the well-known situation for first-order functions, it turns out that at higher types there are several different notions of computability competing for our attention, and each of these has given rise to its own strand of research. In this book, the authors offer an integrated treatment that draws together many of these strands within a unifying framework, revealing not only the range of possible computability concepts but the relationships between them. The book will serve as an ideal introduction to the field for beginning graduate students, as well as a reference for advanced researchers

Computability in Context

Author : S. Barry Cooper
File Size : 79.35 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 870
Read : 501
Download »
Addresses various ways computability and theoretical computer science enable scientists and philosophers to deal with mathematical and real-world issues. This book covers problems related to logic, mathematics, physical processes, real computation and learning theory.

Computability and Models

Author : Barry S. Cooper
File Size : 71.2 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 310
Read : 1191
Download »
There are few notions as fundamental to contemporary science as those of computability and modelling. Computability and Models attempts to make some of the exciting and important new research developments in this area accessible to a wider readership. Written by international leaders drawn from major research centres both East and West, this book is an essential addition to scientific libraries serving both specialist and the interested non-specialist reader.

Deduction Computation Experiment

Author : Rossella Lupacchini
File Size : 80.18 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 638
Read : 376
Download »
This volume is located in a cross-disciplinary ?eld bringing together mat- matics, logic, natural science and philosophy. Re?ection on the e?ectiveness of proof brings out a number of questions that have always been latent in the informal understanding of the subject. What makes a symbolic constr- tion signi?cant? What makes an assumption reasonable? What makes a proof reliable? G ̈ odel, Church and Turing, in di?erent ways, achieve a deep und- standing of the notion of e?ective calculability involved in the nature of proof. Turing’s work in particular provides a “precise and unquestionably adequate” de?nition of the general notion of a formal system in terms of a machine with a ?nite number of parts. On the other hand, Eugene Wigner refers to the - reasonable e?ectiveness of mathematics in the natural sciences as a miracle. Where should the boundary be traced between mathematical procedures and physical processes? What is the characteristic use of a proof as a com- tation, as opposed to its use as an experiment? What does natural science tell us about the e?ectiveness of proof? What is the role of mathematical proofs in the discovery and validation of empirical theories? The papers collected in this book are intended to search for some answers, to discuss conceptual and logical issues underlying such questions and, perhaps, to call attention to other relevant questions.

A Computable Universe

Author : Hector Zenil
File Size : 53.41 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 796
Read : 812
Download »
This volume discusses the foundations of computation in relation to nature. It focuses on two main questions: What is computation? and How does nature compute?

Computation Dynamics and Cognition

Author : Marco Giunti
File Size : 21.50 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 487
Read : 216
Download »
This book explores the application of dynamical theory to cognitive science. Giunti shows how the dynamical approach can illuminate problems of cognition, information processing, consciousness, meaning, and the relation between body and mind.

A Computable Universe

Author : Hector Zenil
File Size : 24.26 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 648
Read : 829
Download »
This volume, with a Foreword writer Sir Roger Penrose, discusses the foundations of computation in relation to nature. It focuses on two main questions: What is computation?How does nature compute? The contributors are world-renowned experts who have helped shape a cutting-edge computational understanding of the universe. They discuss computation in the world from a variety of perspectives, ranging from foundational concepts to pragmatic models to ontological conceptions and philosophical implications. The volume provides a state-of-the-art collection of technical papers and non-technical essays, representing a field that assumes information and computation to be key in understanding and explaining the basic structure underpinning physical reality. It also includes a new edition of Konrad Zuse's “Calculating Space” (the MIT translation), and a panel discussion transcription on the topic, featuring worldwide experts in quantum mechanics, physics, cognition, computation and algorithmic complexity. The volume is dedicated to the memory of Alan M Turing — the inventor of universal computation, on the 100th anniversary of his birth, and is part of the Turing Centenary celebrations. Contents:Foreword (R Penrose)PrefaceAcknowledgementsIntroducing the Computable Universe (H Zenil)Historical, Philosophical & Foundational Aspects of Computation:Origins of Digital Computing: Alan Turing, Charles Babbage, & Ada Lovelace (D Swade)Generating, Solving and the Mathematics of Homo Sapiens. E Post's Views on Computation (L De Mol)Machines (R Turner)Effectiveness (N Dershowitz & E Falkovich)Axioms for Computability: Do They Allow a Proof of Church's Thesis? (W Sieg)The Mathematician's Bias — and the Return to Embodied Computation (S B Cooper)Intuitionistic Mathematics and Realizability in the Physical World (A Bauer)What is Computation? Actor Model versus Turing's Model (C Hewitt)Computation in Nature & the Real World:Reaction Systems: A Natural Computing Approach to the Functioning of Living Cells (A Ehrenfeucht, J Kleijn, M Koutny & G Rozenberg)Bacteria, Turing Machines and Hyperbolic Cellular Automata (M Margenstern)Computation and Communication in Unorganized Systems (C Teuscher)The Many Forms of Amorphous Computational Systems (J Wiedermann)Computing on Rings (G J Martínez, A Adamatzky & H V McIntosh)Life as Evolving Software (G J Chaitin)Computability and Algorithmic Complexity in Economics (K V Velupillai & S Zambelli)Blueprint for a Hypercomputer (F A Doria)Computation & Physics & the Physics of Computation:Information-Theoretic Teleodynamics in Natural and Artificial Systems (A F Beavers & C D Harrison)Discrete Theoretical Processes (DTP) (E Fredkin)The Fastest Way of Computing All Universes (J Schmidhuber)The Subjective Computable Universe (M Hutter)What Is Ultimately Possible in Physics? (S Wolfram)Universality, Turing Incompleteness and Observers (K Sutner)Algorithmic Causal Sets for a Computational Spacetime (T Bolognesi)The Computable Universe Hypothesis (M P Szudzik)The Universe is Lawless or “Pantôn chrêmatôn metron anthrôpon einai” (C S Calude, F W Meyerstein & A Salomaa)Is Feasibility in Physics Limited by Fantasy Alone? (C S Calude & K Svozil)The Quantum, Computation & Information:What is Computation? (How) Does Nature Compute? (D Deutsch)The Universe as Quantum Computer (S Lloyd)Quantum Speedup and Temporal Inequalities for Sequential Actions (M Żukowski)The Contextual Computer (A Cabello)A Gödel-Turing Perspective on Quantum States Indistinguishable from Inside (T Breuer)When Humans Do Compute Quantum (P Zizzi)Open Discussion Section:Open Discussion on A Computable Universe (A Bauer, T Bolognesi, A Cabello, C S Calude, L De Mol, F Doria, E Fredkin, C Hewitt, M Hutter, M Margenstern, K Svozil, M Szudzik, C Teuscher, S Wolfram & H Zenil)Live Panel Discussion (transcription):What is Computation? (How) Does Nature Compute? (C S Calude, G J Chaitin, E Fredkin, A J Leggett, R de Ruyter, T Toffoli & S Wolfram)Zuse's Calculating Space:Calculating Space (Rechnender Raum) (K Zuse)Afterword to Konrad Zuse's Calculating Space (A German & H Zenil) Readership: Graduate students who are specialized researchers in computer science, information theory, quantum theory and modern philosophy and the general public who are interested in these subject areas. Keywords:Digital Physics;Computational Universe;Digital Philosophy;Reality Theories of the Universe;Models of the World;Thring Computation RandomnessKey Features:The authors are all prominent researchersNo competing titlesState-of-the-art collection of technical papers and non-technical essays