Search results for: christianity-in-the-middle-ages

Medieval Christianity

Author : Kevin Madigan
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For many, the medieval world seems dark and foreign—a miraculous, brutal, and irrational time of superstition and strange relics. The pursuit of heretics, the Inquisition, the Crusades and the domination of the “Holy Land” come to mind. Yet the medieval world produced much that is part of our world today, including universities, the passion for Roman architecture and the emergence of the gothic style, pilgrimage, the emergence of capitalism, and female saints. This new narrative history of medieval Christianity, spanning from A.D. 500 to 1500, attempts to combine both what is unfamiliar and what is familiar to readers. Elements of novelty in the book include a steady focus on the role of women in Christianity; the relationships among Christians, Jews, and Muslims; the experience of ordinary parishioners; the adventure of asceticism, devotion and worship, and instruction through drama, architecture, and art. Madigan expertly integrates these areas of focus with more traditional themes, such as the evolution and decline of papal power, the nature and repression of heresy, sanctity and pilgrimage, the conciliar movement, and the break between the old Western church and its reformers. Illustrated with more than forty photographs of physical remains, this book promises to become an essential guide to a historical era of profound influence.

Christendom and Christianity in the Middle Ages

Author : Adriaan H. Bredero
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This is a print on demand book and is therefore non- returnable. Though buffeted on all sides by rapid and at times cataclysmic social, political, and economic change, the medieval church was able to make adjustments that kept it from becoming simply a fossil from the past rather than an enduring institution of salvation. The dynamic interaction between the medieval church and society gives form to this compelling and well-informed study by Adriaan Bredero. By considering medieval Christianity in full relation to its historical context, Bredero elucidates complex medieval realities -- many of which run counter to common modern notions about the Middle Ages. Bredero moves beyond the usual treatment of history by framing his overall discussion in terms of a fascinating and relevant question: To what extent is Christianity today still molded by medieval society? The book begins with an overview of religion and the church in medieval society, from the early Christianization of Western Europe through the fifteenth century. Bredero counters earlier romanticized assessments of the Middle Ages as a thoroughly Christian period by arriving at a definition of Christendom, not in its original sense as the empire of Charlemagne, but rather as "the countries, people, and matters which stood under the influence of Christ."

The Genesis of Science

Author : James Hannam
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The Not-So-Dark Dark Ages What they forgot to teach you in school: People in the Middle Ages did not think the world was flat The Inquisition never executed anyone because of their scientific ideologies It was medieval scientific discoveries, including various methods, that made possible Western civilization’s “Scientific Revolution” As a physicist and historian of science James Hannam debunks myths of the Middle Ages in his brilliant book The Genesis of Science: How the Christian Middle Ages Launched the Scientific Revolution. Without the medieval scholars, there would be no modern science. Discover the Dark Ages and their inventions, research methods, and what conclusions they actually made about the shape of the world.

Christendom and Christianity in the Middle Ages

Author : Adriaan Hendrik Bredero
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Though buffetted on all sides by rapid and at times cataclysmic social, political, and economic change, the medieval church was able to make adjustments that kept it from becoming simply a fossil from the past rather than an enduring institution of salvation. The dynamic interaction between the medieval church and society gives form to this compelling and well-informed study by Adriaan Bredero. By considering medieval Christianity in full relation to its historical context, Bredero elucidates complex medieval realities - many of which run counter to common modern notions about the Middle Ages. Bredero moves beyond the usual treatment of history by framing his overall discussion in terms of a fascinating and relevant question: To what extent is Christianity today still molded by medieval society? The book begins with an overview of religion and the church in medieval society, from the early Christianization of Western Europe through the fifteenth century. Bredero counters earlier romanticized assessments of the Middle Ages as a thoroughly Christian period by arriving at a definition of Christendom, not in its original sense as the empire of Charlemagne, but rather as "the countries, people, and matters which stood under the influence of Christ." Other chapters develop the following topics: medieval conceptions of reality that are prone to modern misunderstanding, such as a view of time that distinguished the distant, "ancient" past - an ideal, golden age - from the recent, "modern" past - an inferior, sub-Christian time - a concept that led to the rise of millenarianism; the role of Jerusalem in Western Christian thought - as a goal for pilgrims, a motivation for the Crusades, and a source of holy relics; the "Truce of God" movement as an attempt by bishops to restore peace, along with an analysis of its motives, limitations, and consequences; the rise of the Cistercian and Cluniac orders as reform movements within monasticism, with particular attention to the role of Bernard of Clairvaux; the veneration of saints, the nature of sainthood, and the growing authority of the pope in determining who was to be called a "saint"; Peter Abelard and his peculiar adversities; the evolution from the ideals of Francis of Assisi to the lifestyle of the Franciscan order. In an important and particularly intriguing chapter, Bredero deals with anti-Jewish feelings in the Middle Ages, examining how both the medieval church and society at large persecuted the Jews.

The Christian World of the Middle Ages

Author : Bernard Hamilton
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This account of the Christian world, East and West, from AD 312 - 1500 challenges the usual Euro-centric view of medieval Christianity. The author reconstructs the faith and heritage of medieval Christendom, revealing its extraordinary impact in both great empires and tiny enclaves.

Peter Abelard Philosophy and Christianity in the Middle Ages

Author : Leif Grane
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Christians and Muslims in the Middle Ages

Author : Michael Frassetto
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The conflict and contact between Muslims and Christians in the Middle Ages is among the most important but least appreciated developments of the period from the seventh to the fourteenth century. Michael Frassetto argues that the relationship between these two faiths during the Middle Ages was essential to the cultural and religious developments of Christianity and Islam—even as Christians and Muslims often found themselves engaged in violent conflict. Frassetto traces the history of those conflicts and argues that these holy wars helped create the identity that defined the essential characteristics of Christians and Muslims. The polemic works that often accompanied these holy wars was important, Frassetto contends, because by defining the essential evil of the enemy, Christian authors were also defining their own beliefs and practices. Holy war was not the only defining element of the relationship between Christians and Muslims during the Middle Ages, and Frassetto explains that everyday contacts between Christian and Muslim leaders and scholars generated more peaceful relations and shaped the literary, intellectual, and religious culture that defined medieval and even modern Christianity and Islam.

History of Christianity in the Middle Ages

Author : William Ragsdale Cannon
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Medieval Christianity

Author : Daniel E. Bornstein
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The fourth volume in A People's History of Christianity series accents the astounding range of cultural and religious experience within medieval Christianity and the ways in which religious life structured all aspects of the daily lives of ordinary Christians. With ranking scholars from the U.S. and the Continent, this volume explores rituals of birth and death, daily parish life, lay-clerical relations, and relations with Jews and Muslims through a thousand years and many lands. Includes 50 illustrations, maps, and an 8-page color gallery.

Places of Worship in the Middle Ages

Author : Kay Eastwood
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Discusses the history, places of worship, and different religions practiced during the Middle Ages.

The Christian Life in the Middle Ages and Other Essays

Author : Frederick Maurice Powicke
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Christianity in the Middle Ages

Author : James Amiraux Jeremie
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Christianity and Violence in the Middle Ages and Early Modern Period

Author : Fernanda Alfieri
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The volume explores the relationship between religion and violence in Europe from the Middle Ages to the Early modern period, involving European and Japanese scholars. It investigates the ideological foundations of the relationship between violence and religion and their development in a varied corpus of sources (political and theological treatises, correspondence of missionaries, pamphlets, and images).

Varieties of Religious Conversion in the Middle Ages

Author : James Muldoon
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"Because conversion gets to the question of how societal change occurs not merely in individuals but in groups, these essays make a valuable contribution to a topic that has generally been treated only in a narrow context. . . . The essays on women and conversion make an especially valuable contribution to the ongoing discussion of women's role in religion."--James M. Powell, Syracuse University "James Muldoon has clearly identified an important, neglected area in medieval studies. . . . Well written and informative. . . . Should pique the interest of future scholars."--Julian Wasserman, Loyola University of New Orleans Contributors describe the wide range of religious experiences characteristic of the conversion of Europe to Christianity in the Middle Ages. From St. Augustine, the model of personal experience, to the conversion of entire societies--like the Saxons in the eighth century or the Lithuanians in the thirteenth--to the role of women in conversion, they examine one of the most important aspects of the spiritual transformation of Europe during the Middle Ages. CONTENTS Introduction: The Conversion of Europe, by James Muldoon Conversion as Personal Experience 1. Augustine: Conversion by the Book, by Frederick H. Russell 2. Monastic Conversion: The Case of Margaret Ebner, by Leonard P. Hindsley O.P. Conversion, Christianization, Acculturation 3. "For Force Is Not of God?" Compulsion and Conversion from Yahweh to Charlemagne, by Lawrence G. Duggan 4. The Conversion of the Physical World: The Creation of a Christian Landscape, by John M. Howe Women in Conversion History 5. Gender and Conversion in the Merovingian Era, by Cordula Nolte 6. God and Man in Medieval Scandinavia: Writing--and Gendering--the Conversion, by Ruth Mazo Karras 7. Marriage and Conversion in Late Medieval Romance, by Jennifer R. Goodman Conversion on the Eastern Frontiers of Christendom 8. Bargaining for Baptism: Lithuanian Negotiations for Conversion, 1250-1358, by Rasa Mazeika 9. Conversion vs. Baptism? European Missionaries in Asia in the Thirteenth and Fourteenth Centuries, by James D. Ryan Jews, Muslims, and Christians as Converts 10. From Jew to Christian? Conversion and Perceptions of Immutability in Medieval Europe, by Jonathan M. Elukin 11. Multidirectional Conversion in the Frankish Levant, by Benjamin Z. Kedar James Muldoon is professor of history at Camden College of Rutgers University and author of The Americas in the Spanish World Order (1994).

Righteous Persecution

Author : Christine Caldwell Ames
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Righteous Persecution examines the long-controversial involvement of the Order of Preachers, or Dominicans, with inquisitions into heresy in medieval Europe. From their origin in the thirteenth century, the Dominicans were devoted to a ministry of preaching, teaching, and pastoral care, to "save souls" particularly tempted by the Christian heresies popular in western Europe. Many persons then, and scholars in our own time, have asked how members of a pastoral order modeled on Christ and the apostles could engage themselves so enthusiastically in the repressive persecution that constituted heresy inquisitions: the arrest, interrogation, torture, punishment, and sometimes execution of those who deviated in belief from Roman Christianity. Drawing on an extraordinarily wide base of ecclesiastical documents, Christine Caldwell Ames recounts how Dominican inquisitors and their supporters crafted and promoted explicitly Christian meanings for their inquisitorial persecution. Inquisitors' conviction that the sin of heresy constituted the graver danger to the Christian soul and to the church at large led to the belief that bringing the individual to repentance—even through the harshest means—was indeed a pious way to carry out their pastoral task. However, the resistance and criticism that inquisition generated in medieval communities also prompted Dominicans to consider further how this new marriage of persecution and holiness was compatible with authoritative Christian texts, exemplars, and traditions. Dominican inquisitors persecuted not despite their faith but rather because of it, as they formed a medieval Christianity that permitted—or demanded—persecution. Righteous Persecution deviates from recent scholarship that has deemphasized religious belief as a motive for inquisition and illuminates a powerful instance of the way Christianity was itself vulnerable in a context of persecution, violence, and intolerance.

The Christian Church in the Middle Ages

Author : Walter Hazen
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In addition to valuable historical and practical information, this packet will teach your students about the state of the church in the Middle Ages, the crusades, and more. Includes review questions, questions for discussion, key word lists, and an answer key.

The Legend of the Middle Ages

Author : Rémi Brague
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Modern interpreters have variously cast the Middle Ages as a benighted past from which the West had to evolve and, more recently, as the model for a potential future of intercultural dialogue and tolerance. The Legend of the Middle Ages cuts through such oversimplifications to reconstruct a complicated and philosophically rich period that remains deeply relevant to the contemporary world. Featuring a penetrating interview and sixteen essays only three of which have previously appeared in English this volume explores key intersections of medieval religion and philosophy. With characteristic erudition and insight, Remi Brague focuses less on individual Christian, Jewish, and Muslim thinkers than on their relationships with one another. Their disparate philosophical worlds, Brague shows, were grounded in different models of revelation that engendered divergent interpretations of the ancient Greek sources they held in common. So, despite striking similarities in their solutions for the philosophical problems they all faced, intellectuals in each theological tradition often viewed the others ideas with skepticism, if not disdain.

Augsburg Historical Atlas of Christianity in the Middle Ages and Reformation

Author : Charles S. Anderson
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Muslim and Christian Contact in the Middle Ages

Author : Jarbel Rodriguez
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To study the interactions between Muslims and Christians in the medieval period is to observe a history of conflict and co-existence encompassing warfare, piracy, and raiding as well as commerce, intellectual exchanges, and personal relationships that transcended religious differences. With particular focus on the Mediterranean world, this collection of more than 80 readings includes sources from Byzantine, Jewish, Muslim, and Latin Christian authors that explore the conflicts and contacts between Muslims and Christians from the seventh to the fifteenth century. Jarbel Rodriguez has selected geographically diverse readings and multiple sources on the same event or topic so that readers gain a better understanding of the relationship that existed between Muslims and Christians in the Middle Ages.

The Routledge History of Medieval Christianity

Author : R. N. Swanson
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The Routledge History of Medieval Christianity explores the role of Christianity in European society from the middle of the eleventh-century until the dawning of the Reformation. Arranged in four thematic sections and comprising 23 originally commissioned chapters plus introductory overviews to each part by the editor, this book provides an authoritative survey of a vital element of medieval history. Comprehensive and cohesive, the volume provides a holistic view of Christianity in medieval Europe, examining not only the church itself but also its role in, influence on, and tensions with, contemporary society. Chapters therefore range from examinations of structures, theology and devotional practices within the church to topics such as gender, violence and holy warfare, the economy, morality, culture, and many more besides, demonstrating the pervasiveness and importance of the church and Christianity in the medieval world. Despite the transition into an increasingly post-Christian age, the historic role of Christianity in the development of Europe remains essential to the understanding of European history – particularly in the medieval period. This collection will be essential reading for students and scholars of medieval studies across a broad range of disciplines.