Biography of Silence

An Essay on Meditation

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Author: Pablo d'Ors

Publisher: Parallax Press

ISBN: 1946764248

Category: Body, Mind & Spirit

Page: 112

View: 2813

A publishing phenomenon in Spain: a moving, lyrical, far-ranging meditation on the deep joys of confronting oneself through silence by a Spanish priest and Zen disciple. With silence increasingly becoming a stranger to us, one man set out to become its intimate: Pablo d'Ors, a Catholic priest whose life was changed by Zen meditation. With disarming honesty and directness, as well as a striking clarity of language, d'Ors shares his struggles as a beginning meditator: the tedium, restlessness, and distraction. But, persevering, the author discovers not only a deep peace and understanding of his true nature, but also that silence, rather than being a retreat from life, offers us an intense engagement with life just as it is. Imbued with a rare beauty, Biography of Silence shows us the deep joy of silence that is available to us all.

World Literature in Spanish: G-Q

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Author: N.A

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 0313337705

Category: African literature

Page: 1294

View: 8021

Contains roughly 850 entries on both major and minor authors, themes, genres, and topics of Spanish literature from the Middle Ages to the present day. Describes the growing diversity within national borders, the increasing interdependence among nations, and the myriad impacts of Spanish literature across the globe.

The Inner Life of Mestizo Nationalism

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Author: Estelle Tarica

Publisher: U of Minnesota Press

ISBN: 0816650047

Category: Social Science

Page: 240

View: 5409

The only recent English-language work on Spanish-American indigenismo from a literary perspective, Estelle Tarica’s work shows how modern Mexican and Andean discourses about the relationship between Indians and non-Indians create a unique literary aesthetic that is instrumental in defining the experience of mestizo nationalism. Engaging with narratives by Jess Lara, Jos Mara Arguedas, and Rosario Castellanos, among other thinkers, Tarica explores the rhetorical and ideological aspects of interethnic affinity and connection. In her examination, she demonstrates that these connections posed a challenge to existing racial hierarchies in Spanish America by celebrating a new kind of national self at the same time that they contributed to new forms of subjection and discrimination. Going beyond debates about the relative merits of indigenismo and mestizaje, Tarica puts forward a new perspective on indigenista literature and modern mestizo identities by revealing how these ideologies are symptomatic of the dilemmas of national subject formation. The Inner Life of Mestizo Nationalism offers insight into the contemporary resurgence and importance of indigenista discourses in Latin America. Estelle Tarica is associate professor of Latin American literature and culture at the University of California, Berkeley.

Tierra del fuego

a biography of the end of the world

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Author: Sylvia Iparraguirre

Publisher: Photo Design Ediciones - Florian von der Fecht

ISBN: 9879916697

Category: Tierra del Fuego (Argentina and Chile)

Page: 217

View: 9245

José Martí

A Revolutionary Life

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Author: Alfred J. López

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 0292759355

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 430

View: 9496

José Martí (1853–1895) was the founding hero of Cuban independence. In all of modern Latin American history, arguably only the "Great Liberator" Simón Bolívar rivals Martí in stature and legacy. Beyond his accomplishments as a revolutionary and political thinker, Martí was a giant of Latin American letters, whose poetry, essays, and journalism still rank among the most important works of the region. Today he is revered by both the Castro regime and the Cuban exile community, whose shared veneration of the "apostle" of freedom has led to his virtual apotheosis as a national saint. In José Martí: A Revolutionary Life, Alfred J. López presents the definitive biography of the Cuban patriot and martyr. Writing from a nonpartisan perspective and drawing on years of research using original Cuban and U.S. sources, including materials never before used in a Martí biography, López strips away generations of mythmaking and portrays Martí as Cuba's greatest founding father and one of Latin America's literary and political giants, without suppressing his public missteps and personal flaws. In a lively account that engrosses like a novel, López traces the full arc of Martí's eventful life, from his childhood and adolescence in Cuba, to his first exile and subsequent life in Spain, Mexico City, and Guatemala, through his mature revolutionary period in New York City and much-mythologized death in Cuba on the battlefield at Dos Ríos. The first major biography of Martí in over half a century and the first ever in English, José Martí is the most substantial examination of Martí's life and work ever published.

How and why I Write

Redefining Hispanic Women's Writing and Experience

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Author: Marisa Herrera Postlewate

Publisher: Peter Lang Pub Incorporated

ISBN: N.A

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 193

View: 9995

Spanish and Latin American women writers share their writing techniques, discuss their professional identities as writers, and explore Hispanic women's writing in the twenty-first century.

The Columbia Guide to the Latin American Novel Since 1945

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Author: Raymond L. Williams

Publisher: Columbia University Press

ISBN: 0231501692

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 400

View: 3884

In this expertly crafted, richly detailed guide, Raymond Leslie Williams explores the cultural, political, and historical events that have shaped the Latin American and Caribbean novel since the end of World War II. In addition to works originally composed in English, Williams covers novels written in Spanish, Portuguese, French, Dutch, and Haitian Creole, and traces the profound influence of modernization, revolution, and democratization on the writing of this era. Beginning in 1945, Williams introduces major trends by region, including the Caribbean and U.S. Latino novel, the Mexican and Central American novel, the Andean novel, the Southern Cone novel, and the novel of Brazil. He discusses the rise of the modernist novel in the 1940s, led by Jorge Luis Borges's reaffirmation of the right of invention, and covers the advent of the postmodern generation of the 1990s in Brazil, the Generation of the "Crack" in Mexico, and the McOndo generation in other parts of Latin America. An alphabetical guide offers biographies of authors, coverage of major topics, and brief introductions to individual novels. It also addresses such areas as women's writing, Afro-Latin American writing, and magic realism. The guide's final section includes an annotated bibliography of introductory studies on the Latin American and Caribbean novel, national literary traditions, and the work of individual authors. From early attempts to synthesize postcolonial concerns with modernist aesthetics to the current focus on urban violence and globalization, The Columbia Guide to the Latin American Novel Since 1945 presents a comprehensive, accessible portrait of a thoroughly diverse and complex branch of world literature.

Críticas

an English speaker's guide to the latest Spanish language titles

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Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 1237