Search results for: art-and-representation

Art and Representation

Author : John Willats
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In Art and Representation, John Willats presents a radically new theory of pictures. To do this, he has developed a precise vocabulary for describing the representational systems in pictures: the ways in which artists, engineers, photographers, mapmakers, and children represent objects. His approach is derived from recent research in visual perception and artificial intelligence, and Willats begins by clarifying the key distinction between the marks in a picture and the features of the scene that these marks represent. The methods he uses are thus closer to those of a modern structural linguist or psycholinguist than to those of an art historian. Using over 150 illustrations, Willats analyzes the representational systems in pictures by artists from a wide variety of periods and cultures. He then relates these systems to the mental processes of picture production, and, displaying an impressive grasp of more than one scholarly discipline, shows how the Greek vase painters, Chinese painters, Giotto, icon painters, Picasso, Paul Klee, and David Hockney have put these systems to work. But this book is not only about what systems artists use but also about why artists from different periods and cultures have used such different systems, and why drawings by young children look so different from those by adults. Willats argues that the representational systems can serve many different functions beyond that of merely providing a convincing illusion. These include the use of anomalous pictorial devices such as inverted perspective, which may be used for expressive reasons or to distance the viewer from the depicted scene by drawing attention to the picture as a painted surface. Willats concludes that art historical changes, and the developmental changes in children's drawings, are not merely arbitrary, nor are they driven by evolutionary forces. Rather, they are determined by the different functions that the representational systems in pictures can serve. Like readers of Ernst Gombrich's famous Art and Illusion (still available from Princeton University Press), on which Art and Representation makes important theoretical advances, or Rudolf Arnheim's Art and Visual Perception, Willats's readers will find that they will never again return to their old ways of looking at pictures.

Richard Wollheim on the Art of Painting

Author : Richard Wollheim
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A collection of essays on Wollheim's philosophy of art; includes a response from Wollheim himself.

Art and Representation

Author : Ananta Charana Sukla
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A multidisciplinary approach to the concept of representation as it applies to art, music, dance, literature, and film.

Beyond Mimesis and Convention

Author : Roman Frigg
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Representation is a concern crucial to the sciences and the arts alike. Scientists devote substantial time to devising and exploring representations of all kinds. From photographs and computer-generated images to diagrams, charts, and graphs; from scale models to abstract theories, representations are ubiquitous in, and central to, science. Likewise, after spending much of the twentieth century in proverbial exile as abstraction and Formalist aesthetics reigned supreme, representation has returned with a vengeance to contemporary visual art. Representational photography, video and ever-evolving forms of new media now figure prominently in the globalized art world, while this "return of the real" has re-energized problems of representation in the traditional media of painting and sculpture. If it ever really left, representation in the arts is certainly back. Central as they are to science and art, these representational concerns have been perceived as different in kind and as objects of separate intellectual traditions. Scientific modeling and theorizing have been topics of heated debate in twentieth century philosophy of science in the analytic tradition, while representation of the real and ideal has never moved far from the core humanist concerns of historians of Western art. Yet, both of these traditions have recently arrived at a similar impasse. Thinking about representation has polarized into oppositions between mimesis and convention. Advocates of mimesis understand some notion of mimicry (or similarity, resemblance or imitation) as the core of representation: something represents something else if, and only if, the former mimics the latter in some relevant way. Such mimetic views stand in stark contrast to conventionalist accounts of representation, which see voluntary and arbitrary stipulation as the core of representation. Occasional exceptions only serve to prove the rule that mimesis and convention govern current thinking about representation in both analytic philosophy of science and studies of visual art. This conjunction can hardly be dismissed as a matter of mere coincidence. In fact, researchers in philosophy of science and the history of art have increasingly found themselves trespassing into the domain of the other community, pilfering ideas and approaches to representation. Cognizant of the limitations of the accounts of representation available within the field, philosophers of science have begun to look outward toward the rich traditions of thinking about representation in the visual and literary arts. Simultaneously, scholars in art history and affiliated fields like visual studies have come to see images generated in scientific contexts as not merely interesting illustrations derived from "high art", but as sophisticated visualization techniques that dynamically challenge our received conceptions of representation and aesthetics. "Beyond Mimesis and Convention: Representation in Art and Science" is motivated by the conviction that we students of the sciences and arts are best served by confronting our mutual impasse and by recognizing the shared concerns that have necessitated our covert acts of kleptomania. Drawing leading contributors from the philosophy of science, the philosophy of literature, art history and visual studies, our volume takes its brief from our title. That is, these essays aim to put the evidence of science and of art to work in thinking about representation by offering third (or fourth, or fifth) ways beyond mimesis and convention. In so doing, our contributors explore a range of topics-fictionalism, exemplification, neuroaesthetics, approximate truth-that build upon and depart from ongoing conversations in philosophy of science and studies of visual art in ways that will be of interest to both interpretive communities. To put these contributions into context, the remainder of this introduction aims to survey how our communities have discretely arrived at a place wherein the perhaps-surprising collaboration between philosophy of science and art history has become not only salubrious, but a matter of necessity.

What is Painting

Author : Julian Bell
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Explores the issues of what defines paintings, what happened to the idea of representation in modern art, and how the twenty-first century will redefine the practice of painting

Identity Fetishism and the Art of Representation

Author : Martijn van Beek
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Art Beyond Representation

Author : Barbara Bolt
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Refuting the assumption that art is a representational practice, this book engages with the work of Heidegger, Deleuze and Guattari, C.S. Pierce and Judith Butler. It argues for a performative relationship between art and artist. Drawing on themes as diverse as the work of Cezanne and Francis Bacon, the transubstantiation of the Catholic sacrament, and Wilde's novel "The Picture of Dorian Gray", she challenges the metaphor of light as entertainment. She suggests that too much "light" may in fact reveal nothing. Finally, she asks: how does an "embodied" practice fare within the culture of conceptual art?

Art Encounters Deleuze and Guattari

Author : S. O'Sullivan
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In a series of philosophical discussions and artistic case studies, this volume develops a materialist and immanent approach to modern and contemporary art. The argument is made for a return to aesthetics - an aesthetics of affect - and for the theorization of art as an expanded and complex practice. Staging a series of encounters between specific Deleuzian concepts - the virtual, the minor, the fold, etc. - and the work of artists that position their work outside of the gallery or 'outside' of representation - Simon O'Sullivan takes Deleuze's thought into other milieus, allowing these 'possible worlds' to work back on philosophy.

Textured Lives

Author : Claudia Schaefer
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Mexican culture has long been the object of scholarly interest and popular curiosity, notably since the 1910 Revolution and most recently in the 1990 Metropolitan Museum of Art exhibit "Mexico: Splendors of Thirty Centuries". During these eight decades in the evolution of the modern Mexican nation, shifting relations of power have constantly met with voices of opposition that have challenged the national vision of progress and unity. Textured Lives explores some of these cracks in the Mexican national edifice by examining the works of women in literature and the arts, with focus on individuals who represent crucial phases in Mexico's cultural history: Frida Kahlo and postrevolutionary nationalism, Rosario Castellanos and the promises of institutionalized revolution, Elena Poniatowska and the legacy of 1968, and Angeles Mastretta and the "golden age" of the oil boom. Schaefer argues that exploring the social context of cultural representation highlights the tensions between master narratives and these women's transgressive forays into those spaces of power. Combining literary theory, cultural analysis, gender study, and theories of artistic representation, her book embraces painting, literary journalism, the epistolary novel, and autobiographical narrative to question the traditional forms of these genres as well as to debate the boundaries between the self and the national identity.

Beyond Mimesis and Convention

Author : Roman Frigg
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Representation is a concern crucial to the sciences and the arts alike. Scientists devote substantial time to devising and exploring representations of all kinds. From photographs and computer-generated images to diagrams, charts, and graphs; from scale models to abstract theories, representations are ubiquitous in, and central to, science. Likewise, after spending much of the twentieth century in proverbial exile as abstraction and Formalist aesthetics reigned supreme, representation has returned with a vengeance to contemporary visual art. Representational photography, video and ever-evolving forms of new media now figure prominently in the globalized art world, while this "return of the real" has re-energized problems of representation in the traditional media of painting and sculpture. If it ever really left, representation in the arts is certainly back. Central as they are to science and art, these representational concerns have been perceived as different in kind and as objects of separate intellectual traditions. Scientific modeling and theorizing have been topics of heated debate in twentieth century philosophy of science in the analytic tradition, while representation of the real and ideal has never moved far from the core humanist concerns of historians of Western art. Yet, both of these traditions have recently arrived at a similar impasse. Thinking about representation has polarized into oppositions between mimesis and convention. Advocates of mimesis understand some notion of mimicry (or similarity, resemblance or imitation) as the core of representation: something represents something else if, and only if, the former mimics the latter in some relevant way. Such mimetic views stand in stark contrast to conventionalist accounts of representation, which see voluntary and arbitrary stipulation as the core of representation. Occasional exceptions only serve to prove the rule that mimesis and convention govern current thinking about representation in both analytic philosophy of science and studies of visual art. This conjunction can hardly be dismissed as a matter of mere coincidence. In fact, researchers in philosophy of science and the history of art have increasingly found themselves trespassing into the domain of the other community, pilfering ideas and approaches to representation. Cognizant of the limitations of the accounts of representation available within the field, philosophers of science have begun to look outward toward the rich traditions of thinking about representation in the visual and literary arts. Simultaneously, scholars in art history and affiliated fields like visual studies have come to see images generated in scientific contexts as not merely interesting illustrations derived from "high art", but as sophisticated visualization techniques that dynamically challenge our received conceptions of representation and aesthetics. "Beyond Mimesis and Convention: Representation in Art and Science" is motivated by the conviction that we students of the sciences and arts are best served by confronting our mutual impasse and by recognizing the shared concerns that have necessitated our covert acts of kleptomania. Drawing leading contributors from the philosophy of science, the philosophy of literature, art history and visual studies, our volume takes its brief from our title. That is, these essays aim to put the evidence of science and of art to work in thinking about representation by offering third (or fourth, or fifth) ways beyond mimesis and convention. In so doing, our contributors explore a range of topics-fictionalism, exemplification, neuroaesthetics, approximate truth-that build upon and depart from ongoing conversations in philosophy of science and studies of visual art in ways that will be of interest to both interpretive communities. To put these contributions into context, the remainder of this introduction aims to survey how our communities have discretely arrived at a place wherein the perhaps-surprising collaboration between philosophy of science and art history has become not only salubrious, but a matter of necessity.

Art and Illusion

Author : Ernst Hans Gombrich
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Aspects of representation in contemporary art

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The Art of Representation

Author : Nacho García
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The Responsibility of Forms

Author : Roland Barthes
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This collection of studies, reviews, and recollections focuses on music and the visual arts deals with Arcimboldo, Erte, the American artist Cy Twombley, Greek theater, and romantic art song

Art After Modernism

Author : Brian Wallis
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Essays present critical analyses of the current trends in arts such as painting, film, and photography

Ritual and Representation in Buddhist Art

Author : Jindal Bae
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This publication investigates the ritual and cultural contexts in which art and representations of Buddhist thought were used in East and Central Asia. The book contains nine essays by specialists in the field. The contributions range from the Buddhist cult of relics in ancient China and material evidences for Buddhist rituals of confession and repentance in North Chinese cave temples of the 6th and early 7th centuries to aspects of cultural exchange, regional innovation, and traditions of imperial workmanship as means of dynastic power. The development of popular iconographies based on Avatamsaka doctrine in Tang China and the Korean kingdom of unified Silla is discussed.

Picture this

Author : Philip Hayward
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""An exciting and informative anthology which will serve as an inspiration to both researchers and teachers."" -- European Journal of Communication With the proliferation of films, television programs, and videos about the arts, this book tackles how these media outlets have approached their subject. It invites debate about the relations between art forms, popular cultural practices (including watching TV), and audiences, as more people receive their understanding of culture and the arts through television than through visits to opera houses, theaters, or art galleries. This collection of articles addresses topics such as the history of art coverage on British television, how the media represents feminist art, and the impact of various postmodern arts practices.

Incendiary Art

Author : Kevin Salatino
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Incendiary Art uses the collections of the Getty Research Institute for the History of Art and the Humanities - prints, drawings, illustrated books, manuscripts, and other objects - to investigate the vibrant imagery produced in an unprecedented flourishing of representations of fireworks and fireworks spectacles in Europe from the sixteenth to the early nineteenth centuries. Concentrating more on the records of these events than the events themselves, Incendiary Art examines these images as vehicles of meaning within the larger context of European culture and politics, without losing sight of their status as artifacts with an independent aesthetic life. Incendiary Art examines pyrotechnics within categories ranging from the theory of the sublime, to politics, poetics, erotics, aesthetics, and volcano lust.

Relate North 2014

Author :
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The Ethics of Representation in Literature Art and Journalism

Author : Caroline Rooney
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This transnational collection of essays, interviews, and creative pieces on the 1982 Siege of Beirut explores literary representations of the siege by a diverse set of writers alongside journalism and other media including film and art. The book investigates and promotes an awareness of an ethics of representation on questions of extreme emotional investment, comparing representations of the siege to representations of other traumatic events, visiting responses from those of different cultural backgrounds to the same event and considering implications with respect to comparative approaches. Chapters explore how literature, journalism and art contribute to overcoming the dangers of forgetting and denial, memorial excess and fundamentalism, the radicalization of violence, and the complete breakdown of trust on international levels, asking how they challenge geopolitical, intellectual, and psychological states of siege and instead promote awareness, acknowledgement, mourning, and justice across divided communities. The book extends the use of postcolonial methodologies affiliated with history, international relations, and psychoanalysis (memory, trauma) to Middle-Eastern studies, and visits the siege�s effect on different forms of memory and memorialization: selective memory, trauma, gaps and fissures in historical accounts, recording of eyewitness reports, and artistic re-imaginings and realizations of alternative archives.