Search results for: anglo-soviet-relations-1917-1921-volume-3

Anglo Soviet Relations 1917 1921 Volume 3

Author : James Ramsey Ullman
File Size : 56.77 MB
Format : PDF, Docs
Download : 813
Read : 414
Download »
In February 1920 the civil war that had ravaged Russia in the wake of the Bolshevik seizure of power was all but over, and with it the attempt of foreign governments to intervene on behlf of the anti-Communist forces. The government most deeply involved in this intervention was that of Great Britain. Yet scarcely a year later Britain was the first major power to come to terms with the new leadership in Moscow. Richard H. Ullman's account of that cautious coming to terms offers a perspective on the processes by which British foreign policy adjusted to the drastically changed circumstances of the aftermath of World War I. Another important theme is the way in which British policy, and the conceptions of peace and security that underlay it, diverged from that of Britain's closest ally, France. The book is, as well, a contribution of the growing literature on bureaucractic politics and the politics of foreign-policy making, and is a protracted essay on the statecraft and political style of David Lloyd George. It draws on many new sources, among them the interecepted and deciphered telegrams of the Soviet mission in London. Richard H. Ullman is Professor of Politics and International Affairs at Princeton University. The Anglo-Soviet Accord is the third and final volume of his Anglo-Soviet Relations, 1917-1921. Originally published in 1973. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

Anglo Soviet Relations 1917 1921 Volume 3

Author : James Ramsey Ullman
File Size : 42.22 MB
Format : PDF, Kindle
Download : 300
Read : 1221
Download »
In February 1920 the civil war that had ravaged Russia in the wake of the Bolshevik seizure of power was all but over, and with it the attempt of foreign governments to intervene on behlf of the anti-Communist forces. The government most deeply involved in this intervention was that of Great Britain. Yet scarcely a year later Britain was the first major power to come to terms with the new leadership in Moscow. Richard H. Ullman's account of that cautious coming to terms offers a perspective on the processes by which British foreign policy adjusted to the drastically changed circumstances of the aftermath of World War I. Another important theme is the way in which British policy, and the conceptions of peace and security that underlay it, diverged from that of Britain's closest ally, France. The book is, as well, a contribution of the growing literature on bureaucractic politics and the politics of foreign-policy making, and is a protracted essay on the statecraft and political style of David Lloyd George. It draws on many new sources, among them the interecepted and deciphered telegrams of the Soviet mission in London. Richard H. Ullman is Professor of Politics and International Affairs at Princeton University. The Anglo-Soviet Accord is the third and final volume of his Anglo-Soviet Relations, 1917-1921. Originally published in 1973. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

Anglo Soviet Relations 1917 1921 Volume 1

Author : Richard Henry Ullman
File Size : 39.41 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 848
Read : 338
Download »
In an intriguing work based largely on new sources, Richard H. Ullman shows how the British government--the politicians, civil servants, military and naval officers--dealt with the problem of Russia during the critical period bewtween the Bolshevik Revolution in November 1917 and Britain's de facto recognition of the Soviet government in March 1921. Volume 1 describes the tragic misunderstandings and desperate hopes of the British in the troubled year before the Armistice, which stands as a watershed in the history of Anglo-Soviet policy. As diplomacy failed, British forces found themselves fighting not only in North Russia but in the Caucasus and on the frontiers of India. The second volume, to be published later, will cover the story to 1921. Dr. Ullman's exciting portrayal of these evetns is a companion work to George Kennan's several-volume study of the same period, "Soviet-American Relations, 1917-1920." Originally published in 1961. The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

The Russian Revolution and Civil War 1917 1921

Author : Jonathan Smele
File Size : 63.26 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 330
Read : 703
Download »
The Russian Revolution and Civil War in the years 1917 to 1921 is one of the most widely studied periods in history. It is also somewhat inevitably one that has generated a huge flow of literature in the decades that have passed since the events themselves. However, until now, historians of the revolution have had no dedicated bibliography of the period and little claim to bibliographical control over the literature. The Russian Revolution and Civil War, 1917-1921offers for the first time a comprehensive bibliographical guide to this crucial and fascinating period of history. The Bibliography focuses on the key years of 1917 to 1921, starting with the February Revolution of 1917 and concluding with the 10th Party Congress of March 1921, and covers all the key events of the intervening years. As such it identifies these crucial years as something more than simply the creation of a communist state.

Soviet Foreign Policy 1917 1991

Author : Gabriel Gorodetsky
File Size : 24.41 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Docs
Download : 643
Read : 205
Download »
A comprehensive assessment of Soviet relations with the West, set in the context of the emergence of a new Russia. This volume anlayzes the formulation of foreign policy during the period from the first decade of the Bolshevik Revolution, through the gradual erosion of ideological differences.

War and Revolution

Author : Norman E. Saul
File Size : 35.10 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 569
Read : 862
Download »
The third volume in Saul's history of U.S.-Russian relations looks at events surrounding America's entry into the European conflict and its encouragement of continued Russian participation, even in the face of domestic unrest. Saul (history, Russian and East European studies, U. of Kansas) draws on military and diplomatic archives in both countries to provide detailed accounts of the activities of consular, diplomatic, and military staffs as well as American businessmen, Red Cross volunteers, and journalists who were working in Russia. His previous diplomatic histories, Distant friends and Concord and conflict, cover events from the 18th and 19th centuries. c. Book News Inc.

Loans and Legitimacy

Author : Katherine A.S. Siegel
File Size : 75.47 MB
Format : PDF, ePub, Mobi
Download : 161
Read : 279
Download »
In 1919 the Soviet government directed Ludwig Martens to open a trade bureau in New York. Before his deportation two years later, Martens had established contact with nearly one thousand American firms and conducted trade in the face of a stiff Allied embargo. His work planted the seeds for growing commercial ties between the U.S. and the U.S.S.R. throughout the 1920s. Because the United States did not recognize the Soviet Union until 1933, historians have viewed the early Soviet--American relationship as an ideological stand-off. Katherine Siegel, drawing on public, private, and corporate documents as well as newly opened Soviet archives, paints a different picture. She finds that business ties flourished between 1923 and 1930, American sales to the Soviets grew twentyfold and American firms supplied Russians with more than a fourth of their imports. American businesses were only too eager to tap into huge Soviet markets. Under the Soviets' New Economic Policy and first Five Year Plan, American firms invested in the U.S.S.R. and sold technical processes, provided consulting services, built factories, and trained Soviet engineers in the U.S. Most significantly, Siegel shows, this commercial relationship encouraged policy shifts at the highest levels of the U.S. government. Thus when Franklin D. Roosevelt opened diplomatic relations with Russia, he was building on ties that had been carefully constructed over the previous fifteen years. Siegel's study makes an important contribution to a new understanding of early Soviet-American relations.

Labour and Russia

Author : Andrew J. Williams
File Size : 70.92 MB
Format : PDF
Download : 751
Read : 954
Download »

British Policy and European Reconstruction After the First World War

Author : Anne Orde
File Size : 44.19 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 318
Read : 1325
Download »
This book is a study of the political economy of Europe after 1919.

The Lights that Failed

Author : Zara S. Steiner
File Size : 73.43 MB
Format : PDF, ePub
Download : 322
Read : 863
Download »
"In 'The Lights that Failed', Steiner challenges the assumption that the Treaty of Versailles led to the opening of a second European war and provides an analysis of the attempts to reconstruct Europe during the 1920s"-OCLC