Search results for: american-disease

American Disease

Author : George C. Lodge
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In this provacative study of the "disease" afflicting American industry today, George Lodge, a distinguished professor at the Harvard Business School, reveals the malady as a psychological disorder, characterized by a refusal to face the facts of interdependence in a competetive world; by a reluctance to confront the grave inadequacies in the operation of our great institutions—business, labor, and government; and by the fact that "leaders do not lead; those with responsibility do not fight. Timidity, born of resignation, discourages change." Lodge begins by defining the disease through its symptoms: failing industries, stubborn unemployment, lagging economic growth, stagnant productivity, overseas competition, focus on short-term financial gain, and, perhaps most telling, the pervasive feeling among Americans that their land of plenty has become a land of want. He examines the gradually changing roles and relationships between government, great corpoations, and trade unions that are nevertheless obscure by traditional and detrimental assumptions, distrust, and a set of ideologies that are increasingly inefficient, ineffective, inconsistent, and irrelevant. And he finds the incoherence of American industrial policy exemplified by the fact the we preach the old virtues of free trade and the sanctity of the market while in actuality we pursue a strategy—including tax incentives and trade subsidies—the misshapes the free market. Based on interviews with more than 150 leaders of the nation's institutions, The American Disease goes beyond diagnosis to offer logical and feasible proposals to cure this dangerous condition. Lodge suggests, for example, that the office of the United States Trade Representative be expanded and strengthened to deal with the growing pressure for protection against imports and with the confusion among our trading partners. He shows why business and labor must work together more closely in a non-adversarial way with federal and local government to determine community needs. He explains why Washington will be forced to direct the future of electric power in America, rather than leave the decisions to fifty different sets of state regulators. And he makes a number of recommendations to alter the ways in which corporations manage themselves and deal with government, and to reduce the social and economic costs that are implicit in these changes. George C. Lodge believes that recovery from our institutional ailments is possible, and this timely and perceptive book offers a resoundingly rational course toward that crucial goal.

Disease in the History of Modern Latin America

Author : Diego Armus
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Challenging traditional approaches to medical history, Disease in the History of Modern Latin America advances understandings of disease as a social and cultural construction in Latin America. This innovative collection provides a vivid look at the latest research in the cultural history of medicine through insightful essays about how disease—whether it be cholera or aids, leprosy or mental illness—was experienced and managed in different Latin American countries and regions, at different times from the late nineteenth century to the present. Based on the idea that the meanings of sickness—and health—are contestable and subject to controversy, Disease in the History of Modern Latin America displays the richness of an interdisciplinary approach to social and cultural history. Examining diseases in Mexico, Brazil, Argentina, Colombia, Peru, and Bolivia, the contributors explore the production of scientific knowledge, literary metaphors for illness, domestic public health efforts, and initiatives shaped by the agendas of international agencies. They also analyze the connections between ideas of sexuality, disease, nation, and modernity; the instrumental role of certain illnesses in state-building processes; welfare efforts sponsored by the state and led by the medical professions; and the boundaries between individual and state responsibilities regarding sickness and health. Diego Armus’s introduction contextualizes the essays within the history of medicine, the history of public health, and the sociocultural history of disease. Contributors. Diego Armus, Anne-Emanuelle Birn, Kathleen Elaine Bliss, Ann S. Blum, Marilia Coutinho, Marcus Cueto, Patrick Larvie, Gabriela Nouzeilles, Diana Obregón, Nancy Lays Stepan, Ann Zulawski

The American Disease

Author : David F. Musto
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The American Disease is a classic study of the development of drug laws in the United States. Supporting the theory that Americans' attitudes toward drugs have followed a cyclic pattern of tolerance and restraint, author David F. Musto examines the relationz between public outcry and the creation of prohibitive drug laws from the end of the Civil War up to the present. Originally published in 1973, and then in an expanded edition in 1987, this third edition contains a new chapter and preface that both address the renewed debate on policy and drug legislation from the end of the Reagan administration to the current Clinton administration. Here, Musto thoroughly investigates how our nation has dealt with such issues as the controversies over prevention programs and mandatory minimum sentencing, the catastrophe of the crack epidemic, the fear of a heroin revival, and the continued debate over the legalization of marijuana.

The American Journal of Syphilis Gonorrhea and Venereal Diseases

Author :
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Disease in the Popular American Press

Author : Terra Diane Ziporyn
File Size : 37.93 MB
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A well-researched, qualitative analysis of how the US mass media covered typhoid fever, diptheria, and syphilis from 1870 to 1920. Ziporyn, a free-lance writer and former American Association for the Advancement of Science mass media fellow, finds consistently high press coverage of typhoid fever contrasted with media disinterest in diptheria and cautious reporting about syphilis. The press's approaches differed, she explains, because the news media responded to dissimilar social values about typhoid fever, diptheria, and syphilis at the turn of the century. Ziporyn's observations are aided by a thorough, well-footnoted analysis of publications across 14 categories. Choice This study explores the depiction of medical science to the American public through the medium of popular magazines in the period 1870 to 1920. To understand the impact of medical advances as conveyed by the popular press, Ziporyn examines articles on diphtheria, typhoid fever, and syphilis in major popular magazines of the time. In search of the common underlying premises, she analyzes the very different depictions of these three diseases: diptheria was associated with children, typhoid fever with uncleanliness, and syphilis with immorality. Although generally conservative in announcing advances, medical popularizers nevertheless presented theory as absolute certainty. Perhaps in anticipation of reader desires, popular articles portrayed medical science as completely devoid of uncertainty of error.

American Plagues

Author : Stephen H. Gehlbach
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American Plagues relates stories of epidemics of our past--smallpox, yellow fever, malaria, polio--offering lessons that help us better understand health problems of today like HIV/AIDS, heart disease and Ebola. Readers learn about these past plagues, those who helped conquer them, and how they shed light on health information of today.

The American Disease

Author : George C. Lodge
File Size : 47.19 MB
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In this provocative study of the "disease" afflicting American industry today, George Lodge, a distinguished professor at the Harvard Business School, reveals the malady as a psychological disorder, characterized by a refusal to face the facts of interdependence in a competitive world; by a reluctance to confront the grave inadequacies in the operation of our great institutions—business, labor, and government; and by the fact that "leaders do not lead; those with responsibility do not fight. Timidity, born of resignation, discourages change." Lodge begins by defining the disease through its symptoms: failing industries, stubborn unemployment, lagging economic growth, stagnant productivity, overseas competition, focus on short-term financial gain, and, perhaps most telling, the pervasive feeling among Americans that their land of plenty has become a land of want. He examines the gradually changing roles and relationships between government, great corporations, and trade unions that are nevertheless obscure by traditional and detrimental assumptions, distrust, and a set of ideologies that are increasingly inefficient, ineffective, inconsistent, and irrelevant. And he finds the incoherence of American industrial policy exemplified by the fact the we preach the old virtues of free trade and the sanctity of the market while in actuality we pursue a strategy—including tax incentives and trade subsidies—the misshapes the free market. Based on interviews with more than 150 leaders of the nation's institutions, The American Disease goes beyond diagnosis to offer logical and feasible proposals to cure this dangerous condition. Lodge suggests, for example, that the office of the United States Trade Representative be expanded and strengthened to deal with the growing pressure for protection against imports and with the confusion among our trading partners. He shows why business and labor must work together more closely in a non-adversarial way with federal and local government to determine community needs. He explains why Washington will be forced to direct the future of electric power in America, rather than leave the decisions to fifty different sets of state regulators. And he makes a number of recommendations to alter the ways in which corporations manage themselves and deal with government, and to reduce the social and economic costs that are implicit in these changes. George C. Lodge believes that recovery from our institutional ailments is possible, and this timely and perceptive book offers a resoundingly rational course toward that crucial goal.

The American Disease

Author : David F. Musto
File Size : 71.89 MB
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The American Disease is a classic study of the development of drug laws in the United States. Supporting the theory that Americans' attitudes toward drugs have followed a cyclic pattern of tolerance and restraint, author David F. Musto examines the relationz between public outcry and the creation of prohibitive drug laws from the end of the Civil War up to the present. Originally published in 1973, and then in an expanded edition in 1987, this third edition contains a new chapter and preface that both address the renewed debate on policy and drug legislation from the end of the Reagan administration to the current Clinton administration. Here, Musto thoroughly investigates how our nation has dealt with such issues as the controversies over prevention programs and mandatory minimum sentencing, the catastrophe of the crack epidemic, the fear of a heroin revival, and the continued debate over the legalization of marijuana.

Disease and Distinctiveness in the American South

Author : Todd L. Savitt
File Size : 88.66 MB
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This book looks at disease entities (yellow fever, hookworm, pellagra) especially associated with the American South and wrestles with the relation of diseases to an issue of perennial concern to southern historians, that of southern distinctiveness.

The American Review of Respiratory Diseases

Author :
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Includes Abstracts section, previously issued separately.

Bacteria and Bayonets

Author : David Petriello
File Size : 81.26 MB
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A fascinating look at how microbes have affected war outcomes from colonial times to the present. Various powerful enemies from the British to the Nazis, and legendary individuals including Tecumseh and Robert E. Lee, have all fallen before the arms of the American soldier. Yet the deadliest enemy faced by the nation, one that has killed more warriors than all its foes combined, is disease. But illness has been more than just a historical cause of casualties for the American military. In numerous wars, it has helped to decide battles, drive campaigns, and determine strategy. In fact, the Patriots owed pestilence as much for their victory in the Revolution as they did their own force of arms. Likewise, disease helped to prevent the conquest of Canada in 1812, drove strategy in the Mexican War, handicapped Lee’s 1862 advance, and helped lead to World War II. Disease also provided an edge in the wars against Native Americans, yet just as soon turned on the United States when unacclimated US troops were dispatched to the southern Pacific. This book not only traces the path of disease in American military history but also recounts numerous episodes and anecdotes related to the history of illness. It is a compelling story, one that has been overlooked and underappreciated. Yellow fever, malaria, tuberculosis, glanders, bubonic plague, smallpox, and numerous other bacteria and viruses all conspired to defeat America—and remain enemies that need to be recognized.

The Topography of Wellness

Author : Sara Jensen Carr
File Size : 69.90 MB
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The COVID-19 pandemic has re-ignited discussions of how architects, landscapes, and urban planners can shape the environment in response to disease. This challenge is both a timely topic and one with an illuminating history. In The Topography of Wellness, Sara Jensen Carr offers a chronological narrative of how six epidemics transformed the American urban landscape, reflecting changing views of the power of design, pathology of disease, and the epidemiology of the environment. From the infectious diseases of cholera and tuberculosis, to so-called "social diseases" of idleness and crime, to the more complicated origins of today's chronic diseases, each illness and its associated combat strategies has left its mark on our surroundings. While each solution succeeded in eliminating the disease on some level, sweeping environmental changes often came with significant social and physical consequences. Even more unexpectedly, some adaptations inadvertently incubated future epidemics. From the Industrial Revolution to present day, this book illuminates the constant evolution of our relationship to wellness and the environment by documenting the shifting grounds of illness and the urban landscape.

Common Enemies

Author : Rachel Kahn Best
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For over a hundred years, millions of Americans have joined together to fight a common enemy by campaigning against diseases. In Common Enemies, Rachel Kahn Best asks why disease campaigns have dominated a century of American philanthropy and health policy and how the fixation on diseases shapes efforts to improve lives. Combining quantitative and qualitative analyses in an unprecedented history of disease politics, Best shows that to achieve consensus, disease campaigns tend to neglect stigmatized diseases and avoid controversial goals. But despite their limitations, disease campaigns do not crowd out efforts to solve other problems. Instead, they teach Americans to give and volunteer and build up public health infrastructure, bringing us together to solve problems and improve our lives.

American Trypanosomiasis Chagas Disease

Author : Jenny Telleria
File Size : 57.49 MB
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American Trypanosomiasis, Chagas Disease: One Hundred Years of Research, Second Edition, provides a comprehensive overview of Chagas disease and discusses the latest discoveries concerning the three elements that compose the transmission chain of the disease, the host, the insect vectors, and the causative parasite. In addition, new insights on the molecular biology and diagnostics of Chagas diseases, the persistence of infections in the host, and the interaction of the parasite and host metabolism are now included in this new and updated edition. Provides a thoroughly revised, updated, and streamlined new edition with contributions from leading authorities and industry experts Informs and updates on all the latest developments of Chagas disease, covering biology, clinical aspects, and human sciences Includes a summarizing chapter that provides key insights of practical significance for prevention efforts

III Inter American Meeting on Foot and Mouth Disease and Zoonoses Control

Author :
File Size : 22.82 MB
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The American Review of Respiratory Disease

Author :
File Size : 53.61 MB
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Includes Abstracts section, previously issued separately.

The New American Disease tularemia

Author : State board of Indiana--Health
File Size : 58.27 MB
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American Trypanosomiasis Chagas Disease One Hundred Years of Research

Author : Micahel Tibayrenc
File Size : 80.4 MB
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Chagas disease causes severe socioeconomic impact and a high medical cost in Latin America. WHO and the World Bank consider Chagas disease as the fourth most transmittable disease to have a major impact on public health in Latin America: 120 million persons are potentially exposed, 16 to 18 million of whom are presently infected, causing 45,000 to 50,000 deaths per year. It has been calculated that approximately 2.4 million potential working years are lost because of incapacity and mortality due to the disease, for an annual cost estimated at 20 billion Euros. This book provides a comprehensive overview of Chagas disease and discusses the latest discoveries concerning the three elements that compose the transmission chain of the disease: The host: human and mammalian reservoirsThe insect vectors: domestic and sylvatic vectorsThe causative parasite: "Trypanosoma cruzi" * Informs and updates on all the latest developments in the field * Contributions from leading authorities and industry experts

Neglected Tropical Diseases Latin America and the Caribbean

Author : Carlos Franco-Paredes
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This book addresses the major neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) – based on their prevalence and the years of healthy life lost to disability – in Latin American and Caribbean countries. These include Chagas disease, leishmaniasis, hookworm infection, and other soil-transmitted helminth infections, followed by dengue, schistosomiasis, leishmaniasis, leprosy, cysticercosis, bartonellosis, Plasmodium vivax malaria, and onchocerciasis. Topics like disease burden, major manifestations and approaches to the control and elimination of NTDs in Latin America and the Caribbean are discussed in detail. As such, the book will be of general interest to basic researchers and clinicians engaged in infectious disease, tropical medicine, and parasitology, and a must-have for scientists specialized in the characteristics of this region of the world.​

The American Psychiatric Publishing Textbook of Alzheimer Disease and Other Dementias

Author : Myron F. Weiner
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The American Psychiatric Publishing Textbook of Alzheimer Disease and Other Dementias is an up-to-date and comprehensive overview of dementia for psychiatrists and other health care practitioners who deal with cognitively impaired adults in outpatient, inpatient, and long-term care settings. With content ranging from clinical guidance to basic research, it contains information on nearly every subject related to dementing conditions or illnesses -- not only providing extensive coverage of clinical management issues but also enabling a deeper understanding of the causes of dementia. Designed to assist the practitioner faced with everyday dilemmas, from dosages of antipsychotic drugs to legal and ethical issues, this textbook describes in detail the most common conditions and diseases leading to dementia and covers pharmacologic, behavioral, and environmental treatments. It also considers a broader range of cognitive disorders and impairment in order to help practitioners recognize and treat primary brain diseases and systemic disorders affecting the brain before they reach the stage of dementia. Building on the editors' earlier work The Dementias: Diagnosis, Treatment, and Research, this new book expands on its scope, with nearly twice the number of contributors -- all clinicians or researchers at the vanguard of the field. New to this edition are chapters on epidemiology, history of dementia, biomarkers for Alzheimer disease, care of the late-stage dementia patient, prevention of dementia, and chapters devoted to: Vascular cognitive impairment, emphasizing the importance of early detection with development of appropriate treatments and risk factor control Dementia with Lewy bodies and other synucleinopathies, describing differences in cognitive profile between synucleinopathies and Alzheimer disease Frontotemporal dementias, including behavioral and language variants Traumatic brain injury, distinguishing between proximal and distal effects and risk factors for dementia later in life An abundance of charts and illustrations, extensive references and additional readings, and chapter-end key points make this a practical volume for learning, while appendixes include easily administered instruments useful in daily practice for grading cognition, day-to-day function, neuropsychiatric symptoms, and quality of life. Whether used as a clinical guide or as a sourcebook on technical and scientific developments, The American Psychiatric Publishing Textbook of Alzheimer Disease and Other Dementias is an important reference for psychiatrists, neurologists, geriatricians, primary care physicians, and other health professionals who deal with cognitively impaired adults.