Imagining Nations

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Author: Geoffrey Cubitt

Publisher: Manchester University Press

ISBN: 9780719054600

Category: History

Page: 260

View: 7900

The concept of the nation is central to modern understandings both of political community and of personal identity. Dealing chiefly with British and German examples, but relating these to wider conceptual and theoretical issues, the essays in this book illustrate both the diversity and the potential of a cultural approach to nationhood and nationalism. 55 illustrations.

Genesis and Geology

A Study in the Relations of Scientific Thought, Natural Theology, and Social Opinion in Great Britain, 1790-1850

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Author: Charles Coulston Gillispie

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674344815

Category: History

Page: 315

View: 2529

First published in 1951, Genesis and Geology describes the background of social and theological ideas and the progress of scientific researches which, between them, produced the religious difficulties that afflicted the development of science in early industrial England. The book makes clear that the furor over On the Origin of Species was nothing new: earlier discoveries in science (particularly geology) had presented major challenges, not only to the literal interpretation of the Book of Genesis, but even more seriously to the traditional idea that Providence controls the order of nature with an eye to fulfilling divine purpose. A new Foreword by Nicolaas A. Rupke places this book in the context of the last forty-five years of scholarship in the social history of evolutionary thought.

Popularizing Classical Economics

Henry Brougham and William Ellis

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Author: W.D. Sockwell

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1349235695

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 224

View: 1050

Popularizing Classical Economics analyzes the theoretical contributions of two British Economists, Henry Brougham and William Ellis, and describes how they popularized economic ideas from the early 1800s through the 1860s. Efforts to spread economic ideas to the lay public have been little studied and few individuals have been recognized for their efforts. This book traces the efforts of Brougham and Ellis to spread classical economic ideas through education of both adults and children.

A Library of the World's Best Literature - Ancient and Modern - Vol.XLII (Forty-Five Volumes); Dictionary of Authors (A-J)

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Author: Charles Dudley Warner

Publisher: Cosimo, Inc.

ISBN: 1605202487

Category: History

Page: 308

View: 9049

Popular American essayist, novelist, and journalist CHARLES DUDLEY WARNER (1829-1900) was renowned for the warmth and intimacy of his writing, which encompassed travelogue, biography and autobiography, fiction, and more, and influenced entire generations of his fellow writers. Here, the prolific writer turned editor for his final grand work, a splendid survey of global literature, classic and modern, and it's not too much to suggest that if his friend and colleague Mark Twain-who stole Warner's quip about how "everybody complains about the weather, but nobody does anything about it"-had assembled this set, it would still be hailed today as one of the great achievements of the book world. Volume 42 is Part One of a dictionary of authors-from Alexis Aar to Juvenal-that serves as a handy, condensed reference to the authors quoted in the first 40 volumes, as well as a guide to thousands more authors whose works are notable but not featured in this set.

Amiens and Munich

Comparisons in Appeasement

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Author: E.L. Presseisen

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9400997183

Category: History

Page: 158

View: 4360

It has not been my intention to write a definitive study of appeasement. Such a work would have to include the French variety, Stalin's appeasement of Hitler between 1939 and 1941, or the appeasement of Japan in 1938 and 1939. I chose the British case for a number of reasons. The opportunity of a comparative model was a challenge, British appeasement was well known, and the structure of the British government remained rather the same in the intervening period between Waterloo and Dunkirk. I admit that Amiens and Munich represent the most dramatic episodes in the story of appeasement, but then the British struggles against Bonaparte and Hitler were of epic proportions. It was of course unnecessary "to prove" appeasement at Munich, but very few historians had looked at the treaty of Amiens in this way. Much of my research effort was therefore devoted to examining the published material of the earlier period. While I have used some original Addington documents, this work is not primarily an inquiry into unpublished sources but a rein terpretation of well known events that were made public long ago. The flood of publications and revelations of the 1930's continues unabated. I have tried to use the latest studies, especially those that have benefited from the thirty year rule. My debts of gratitude extend over a long period since two stints as chairman of the department have delayed this book by at least four years.

Notes & Queries

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Author: William White

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Questions and answers

Page: N.A

View: 1640

The Athenaeum

Journal of Literature, Science, the Fine Arts, Music and the Drama

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Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: England

Page: N.A

View: 415

The Condition of the Working-Class in England in 1844

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Author: Frederick Engels

Publisher: BookRix GmbH & Company KG

ISBN: 3730964852

Category: History

Page: 466

View: 4692

The Condition of the Working Class in England is one of the best-known works of Friedrich Engels. Originally written in German as Die Lage der arbeitenden Klasse in England, it is a study of the working class in Victorian England. It was also Engels' first book, written during his stay in Manchester from 1842 to 1844. Manchester was then at the very heart of the Industrial Revolution, and Engels compiled his study from his own observations and detailed contemporary reports. Engels argues that the Industrial Revolution made workers worse off. He shows, for example, that in large industrial cities mortality from disease, as well as death-rates for workers were higher than in the countryside. In cities like Manchester and Liverpool mortality from smallpox, measles, scarlet fever and whooping cough was four times as high as in the surrounding countryside, and mortality from convulsions was ten times as high as in the countryside. The overall death-rate in Manchester and Liverpool was significantly higher than the national average (one in 32.72 and one in 31.90 and even one in 29.90, compared with one in 45 or one in 46). An interesting example shows the increase in the overall death-rates in the industrial town of Carlisle where before the introduction of mills (1779-1787), 4,408 out of 10,000 children died before reaching the age of five, and after their introduction the figure rose to 4,738. Before the introduction of mills, 1,006 out of 10,000 adults died before reaching 39 years old, and after their introduction the death rate rose to 1,261 out of 10,000.