Thoreau's Country

Journey through a Transformed Landscape

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Author: David R. Foster,Henry David Thoreau

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674037151

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 7907

In 1977 David Foster took to the woods of New England to build a cabin with his own hands. Along with a few tools he brought a copy of the journals of Henry David Thoreau. Foster was struck by how different the forested landscape around him was from the one Thoreau described more than a century earlier. The sights and sounds that Thoreau experienced on his daily walks through nineteenth-century Concord were those of rolling farmland, small woodlands, and farmers endlessly working the land. As Foster explored the New England landscape, he discovered ancient ruins of cellar holes, stone walls, and abandoned cartways--all remnants of this earlier land now largely covered by forest. How had Thoreau's open countryside, shaped by ax and plough, divided by fences and laneways, become a forested landscape? Part ecological and historical puzzle, this book brings a vanished countryside to life in all its dimensions, human and natural, offering a rich record of human imprint upon the land. Extensive excerpts from the journals show us, through the vividly recorded details of daily life, a Thoreau intimately acquainted with the ways in which he and his neighbors were changing and remaking the New England landscape. Foster adds the perspective of a modern forest ecologist and landscape historian, using the journals to trace themes of historical and social change. Thoreau's journals evoke not a wilderness retreat but the emotions and natural history that come from an old and humanized landscape. It is with a new understanding of the human role in shaping that landscape, Foster argues, that we can best prepare ourselves to appreciate and conserve it today. From the journal: "I have collected and split up now quite a pile of driftwood--rails and riders and stems and stumps of trees--perhaps half or three quarters of a tree...Each stick I deal with has a history, and I read it as I am handling it, and, last of all, I remember my adventures in getting it, while it is burning in the winter evening. That is the most interesting part of its history. It has made part of a fence or a bridge, perchance, or has been rooted out of a clearing and bears the marks of fire on it...Thus one half of the value of my wood is enjoyed before it is housed, and the other half is equal to the whole value of an equal quantity of the wood which I buy." --October 20, 1855

Thoreau Country

Photographs and Text Selections from the Works of H. D. Thoreau

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Author: Herbert Wendell Gleason

Publisher: Random House (NY)

ISBN: N.A

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 143

View: 7114

Walden

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Author: Henry David Thoreau

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Authors, American

Page: 440

View: 9734

The Wildest Country

Exploring Thoreau's Maine

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Author: J. Parker Huber

Publisher: Appalachian Mountain Club

ISBN: 9781934028094

Category: History

Page: 218

View: 8818

Back in print by popular demand, this revised edition follows the famed naturalist Henry David Thoreau s sojourns in Maine and provides today s travelers with modern-day excursions."

Thoreau and the Art of Life

Reflections on Nature and the Mystery of Existence

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Author: Henry David Thoreau

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 1556438834

Category: Art

Page: 95

View: 5483

Combines nearly 100 luminous watercolor illustrations with eloquent passages from the writings of the American transcendentalist author and philosopher, in a book that draws largely from Thoreau's journals to reveal his ideas about nature, creativity, spirituality, aging and wisdom. Original.

Henry David Thoreau

A Life

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Author: Laura Dassow Walls

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 022634472X

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 640

View: 1337

“Walden. Yesterday I came here to live.” That entry from the journal of Henry David Thoreau, and the intellectual journey it began, would by themselves be enough to place Thoreau in the American pantheon. His attempt to “live deliberately” in a small woods at the edge of his hometown of Concord has been a touchstone for individualists and seekers since the publication of Walden in 1854. But there was much more to Thoreau than his brief experiment in living at Walden Pond. A member of the vibrant intellectual circle centered on his neighbor Ralph Waldo Emerson, he was also an ardent naturalist, a manual laborer and inventor, a radical political activist, and more. Many books have taken up various aspects of Thoreau’s character and achievements, but, as Laura Dassow Walls writes, “Thoreau has never been captured between covers; he was too quixotic, mischievous, many-sided.” Two hundred years after his birth, and two generations after the last full-scale biography, Walls restores Henry David Thoreau to us in all his profound, inspiring complexity. Walls traces the full arc of Thoreau’s life, from his early days in the intellectual hothouse of Concord, when the American experiment still felt fresh and precarious, and “America was a family affair, earned by one generation and about to pass to the next.” By the time he died in 1862, at only forty-four years of age, Thoreau had witnessed the transformation of his world from a community of farmers and artisans into a bustling, interconnected commercial nation. What did that portend for the contemplative individual and abundant, wild nature that Thoreau celebrated? Drawing on Thoreau’s copious writings, published and unpublished, Walls presents a Thoreau vigorously alive in all his quirks and contradictions: the young man shattered by the sudden death of his brother; the ambitious Harvard College student; the ecstatic visionary who closed Walden with an account of the regenerative power of the Cosmos. We meet the man whose belief in human freedom and the value of labor made him an uncompromising abolitionist; the solitary walker who found society in nature, but also found his own nature in the society of which he was a deeply interwoven part. And, running through it all, Thoreau the passionate naturalist, who, long before the age of environmentalism, saw tragedy for future generations in the human heedlessness around him. “The Thoreau I sought was not in any book, so I wrote this one,” says Walls. The result is a Thoreau unlike any seen since he walked the streets of Concord, a Thoreau for our time and all time.

Civil Disobedience and Other Essays

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Author: Henry David Thoreau

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN: 0486110117

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 96

View: 9859

Representative sampling of Thoreau's most frequently read and cited essays: "On the Duty of Civil Disobedience" (1849), "Life without Principle" (1863), "Slavery in Massachusetts" (1854), "A Plea for Captain John Brown" (1869) and "Walking" (1862).

Cape Cod

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Author: Henry David Thoreau

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Cape Cod

Page: 252

View: 8809

Walking

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Author: Henry David Thoreau

Publisher: Cosimo, Inc.

ISBN: 1596058811

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 60

View: 6168

The philosophies of HENRY DAVID THOREAU (1817-1862)-hero to environmentalists and ecologists, profound thinker on humanity's happiness-have greatly influenced the American character, and his writings on human nature, materialism, and the natural world continue to be of profound import today. In this essay, first published in the Atlantic Monthly in 1862 and vital to any appreciation of the great man's work, Thoreau explores: . the joys and necessities of long afternoon walks . how spending time in untrammeled fields and woods soothes the spirit . how Nature guides us on our walks . the lure of the wild for writers and artists . why "all good things are wild and free" . and more. ALSO FROM COSIMO: Thoreau's Walden and Civil Disobedience

Walden and Other Writings

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Author: Henry David Thoreau

Publisher: Bantam Classics

ISBN: 0553900773

Category: Fiction

Page: 464

View: 7973

With their call for "simplicity, simplicity, simplicity!”, for self-honesty, and for harmony with nature, the writings of Henry David Thoreau are perhaps the most influential philosophical works in all American literature. The selections in this volume represent Thoreau at his best. Included in their entirety are Walden, his indisputable masterpiece, and his two great arguments for nonconformity, Civil Disobedience and Life Without Principle. A lifetime of brilliant observation of nature--and of himself--is recorded in selections from A Week On The Concord And Merrimack Rivers, Cape Cod, The Maine Woods and The Journal. From the Paperback edition.

Thoreau's Wildflowers

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Author: Henry David Thoreau

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300214774

Category: Nature

Page: 344

View: 3383

Some of Henry David Thoreau's most beautiful nature writing was inspired by the flowering trees and plants of Concord. An inveterate year-round rambler and journal keeper, he faithfully recorded, dated, and described his sightings of the floating water lily, the elusive wild azalea, and the late autumn foliage of the scarlet oak. This inviting selection of Thoreau's best flower writings is arranged by day of the year and accompanied by Thoreau's philosophical speculations and his observations of the weather and of other plants and animals. They illuminate the author's spirituality, his belief in nature's correspondence with the human soul, and his sense that anticipation--of spring, of flowers yet to bloom--renews our connection with the earth and with immortality. Thoreau's Wildflowers features more than 200 of the black-and-white drawings originally created by Barry Moser for his first illustrated book, Flowering Plants of Massachusetts. This volume also presents "Thoreau as Botanist," an essay by Ray Angelo, the leading authority on the flowering plants of Concord.

The Journal, 1837-1861

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Author: Henry David Thoreau,Damion Searls

Publisher: New York Review of Books

ISBN: 159017321X

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 667

View: 6973

The largest one-volume edition of the American thinker's journals ever published captures the scope, rhythms, and variety of the work as a whole, exploring the source from which Thoreau drew his timeless books and essays. Original.

Thoreau's Animals

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Author: Henry David Thoreau,Debby Cotter Kaspari,Geoff Wisner

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300223765

Category: Nature

Page: 280

View: 9252

From Thoreau's renowned Journal, a treasury of memorable, funny, and sharply observed accounts of his encounters with the wild and domestic animals of Concord Many of the most vivid writings in the renowned Journal of Henry David Thoreau concern creatures he came upon when rambling the fields, forests, and wetlands of Concord and nearby communities. A keen and thoughtful observer, he wrote frequently about these animals, always sensitive to their mysteries and deeply appreciative of their beauty and individuality. Whether serenading the perch of Walden Pond with his flute, chasing a loon across the water's surface, observing a battle between black and red ants, or engaging in a battle of wits with his family's runaway pig, Thoreau penned his journal entries with the accuracy of a scientist and the deep spirituality of a transcendentalist and mystic. This volume, like its companion Thoreau's Wildflowers, is arranged by the days of the year, following the progress of the turning seasons. A selection of his original sketchbook drawings is included, along with thirty-five exquisite illustrations by naturalist and artist Debby Cotter Kaspari.

The Adventures of Henry Thoreau

A Young Man's Unlikely Path to Walden Pond

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Author: Michael Sims

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1408838230

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 384

View: 3994

From Mahatma Gandhi and John F. Kennedy to Martin Luther King and Leo Tolstoy, the works of Henry David Thoreau – author, poet, philosopher, abolitionist, naturalist, surveyor, schoolteacher, engineer – have long been an inspiration to many. But who was the unsophisticated young man who in 1837 became a protégé of Ralph Waldo Emerson? The Adventures of Henry Thoreau tells the colourful story of a complex man seeking a meaningful life in a tempestuous era. In rich, evocative prose Michael Sims brings to life the insecure, youthful Henry, as he embarks on the path to becoming the literary icon Thoreau. Using the letters and diaries of Thoreau's family, friends and students, Michael Sims charts his coming of age within a family struggling to rise above poverty in 1830s America. From skating and boating with Nathaniel Hawthorne, to travels with his brother, John Thoreau, and the launching of their progressive school, Sims paints a vivid portrait of the young writer struggling to find his voice through communing with nature, whether mountain climbing in Maine or building his life-changing cabin at Walden Pond. He explores Thoreau's infatuation with the beautiful young woman who rejected his proposal of marriage, the influence of his mother and sisters – who were passionate abolitionists – and that of the powerful cultural currents of the day. With emotion and texture, The Adventures of Henry Thoreau sheds fresh light on one of the most iconic figures in American history.

The Portable Thoreau

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Author: Henry David Thoreau

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781101128107

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 656

View: 5612

An updated edition of Thoreau's most widely read works Self-described as "a mystic, a transcendentalist, and a natural philosopher to boot," Henry David Thoreau dedicated his life to preserving his freedom as a man and as an artist. Nature was the fountainhead of his inspiration and his refuge from what he considered the follies of society. Heedless of his friends' advice to live in a more orthodox manner, he determinedly pursued his own inner bent-that of a poet-philosopher-in prose and verse. Edited by noted Thoreau scholar Jeffrey S. Cramer, this edition promises to be the new standard for those interested in discovering the great thinker's influential ideas about everything from environmentalism to limited government. For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators. From the Trade Paperback edition.

The Boatman

Henry David Theoreau's River Years

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Author: Robert M. Thorson

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674977726

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 336

View: 3931

Robert Thorson gives readers a Thoreau for the Anthropocene. The boatman and backyard naturalist was keenly aware of the way humans had altered the waterways and meadows of his beloved Concord River Valley. Yet he sought out for solace and pleasure those river sites most dramatically altered by human invention and intervention—for better and worse.

Faith in a Seed

The Dispersion Of Seeds And Other Late Natural History Writings

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Author: Henry D. Thoreau

Publisher: Island Press

ISBN: 9781597262873

Category: Nature

Page: 301

View: 6024

Faith in a Seed contains the hitherto unpublished work The Dispersion of Seeds, one of Henry D. Thoreau's last important research and writing projects, and now his first new book to appear in 125 years.With the remarkable clarity and grace that characterize all of his writings, Thoreau describes the ecological succession of plant species through seed dispersal. The Dispersion of Seeds, which draws on Charles Darwin's theory of natural selection, refutes the then widely accepted theory that some plants spring spontaneously to life, independent of roots, cuttings, or seeds. As Thoreau wrote: "Though I do not believe a plant will spring up where no seed has been, I have great faith in a seed. Convince me that you have a seed there, and I am prepared to expect wonders." Henry D. Thoreau's Faith in a Seed, was first published in hardcover in 1993 by Island Press under the Shearwater Books imprint, which unifies scientific views of nature with humanistic ones. This important work, the first publication of Thoreau's last manuscript, is now available in paperback. Faith in a Seed contains Thoreau's last important research and writing project, The Dispersion of Seeds, along with other natural history writings from late in his life. Edited by Bradley P. Dean, professor of English at East Carolina University and editor of the Thoreau Society Bulletin, these writings demonstrate how a major American author at the height of his career succeeded in making science and literature mutually enriching.