The Scientific Revolution

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Author: Steven Shapin

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226750221

Category: Science

Page: 232

View: 1517

"There was no such thing as the Scientific Revolution, and this is a book about it." With this provocative and apparently paradoxical claim, Steven Shapin begins his bold vibrant exploration of the origins of the modern scientific worldview. "Shapin's account is informed, nuanced, and articulated with clarity. . . . This is not to attack or devalue science but to reveal its richness as the human endeavor that it most surely is. . . .Shapin's book is an impressive achievement."—David C. Lindberg, Science "Shapin has used the crucial 17th century as a platform for presenting the power of science-studies approaches. At the same time, he has presented the period in fresh perspective."—Chronicle of Higher Education "Timely and highly readable . . . A book which every scientist curious about our predecessors should read."—Trevor Pinch, New Scientist "It's hard to believe that there could be a more accessible, informed or concise account of how it [the scientific revolution], and we have come to this. The Scientific Revolution should be a set text in all the disciplines. And in all the indisciplines, too."—Adam Phillips, London Review of Books "Shapin's treatise on the currents that engendered modern science is a combination of history and philosophy of science for the interested and educated layperson."—Publishers Weekly "Superlative, accessible, and engaging. . . . Absolute must-reading."—Robert S. Frey, Bridges "This vibrant historical exploration of the origins of modern science argues that in the 1600s science emerged from a variety of beliefs, practices, and influences. . . . This history reminds us that diversity is part of any intellectual endeavor."—Choice "Most readers will conclude that there was indeed something dramatic enough to be called the Scientific Revolution going on, and that this is an excellent book about it."—Anthony Gottlieb, The New York Times Book Review

The Scientific Revolution: A Very Short Introduction

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Author: Lawrence Principe

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199567417

Category: Science

Page: 148

View: 8894

Lawrence M. Principe takes a fresh approach to the story of the scientific revolution, emphasising the historical context of the society and its world view at the time. From astronomy to alchemy and medicine to geology, he tells this fascinating story from the perspective of the historical characters involved.

Ingenious Pursuits

Building the Scientific Revolution

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Author: Lisa Jardine

Publisher: Anchor

ISBN: 0385720017

Category: History

Page: 444

View: 7052

The author of the critically acclaimed Worldly Goods presents a thoughtful reassessment of the Renaissance in terms of its influence on the history of science, relating the era's imaginative, artistic endeavors to the creative inspiration behind the scientific discoveries of the period. Reprint. 20,000 first printing.

Rethinking the Scientific Revolution

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Author: Margaret J. Osler

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521667906

Category: Science

Page: 340

View: 9343

This collection reconsiders canonical figures and the formation of disciplinary boundaries during the Scientific Revolution.

The Structure of Scientific Revolutions

50th Anniversary Edition

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Author: Thomas S. Kuhn

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226458148

Category: Science

Page: 264

View: 7664

A good book may have the power to change the way we see the world, but a great book actually becomes part of our daily consciousness, pervading our thinking to the point that we take it for granted, and we forget how provocative and challenging its ideas once were—and still are. The Structure of Scientific Revolutions is that kind of book. When it was first published in 1962, it was a landmark event in the history and philosophy of science. Fifty years later, it still has many lessons to teach. With The Structure of Scientific Revolutions, Kuhn challenged long-standing linear notions of scientific progress, arguing that transformative ideas don’t arise from the day-to-day, gradual process of experimentation and data accumulation but that the revolutions in science, those breakthrough moments that disrupt accepted thinking and offer unanticipated ideas, occur outside of “normal science,” as he called it. Though Kuhn was writing when physics ruled the sciences, his ideas on how scientific revolutions bring order to the anomalies that amass over time in research experiments are still instructive in our biotech age. This new edition of Kuhn’s essential work in the history of science includes an insightful introduction by Ian Hacking, which clarifies terms popularized by Kuhn, including paradigm and incommensurability, and applies Kuhn’s ideas to the science of today. Usefully keyed to the separate sections of the book, Hacking’s introduction provides important background information as well as a contemporary context. Newly designed, with an expanded index, this edition will be eagerly welcomed by the next generation of readers seeking to understand the history of our perspectives on science.

Galileo and the Scientific Revolution

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Author: Laura Fermi,Gilberto Bernardini

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN: 0486170020

Category: Science

Page: 128

View: 2263

An absorbing account of the origins of modern science as well as a biography, this book places particular emphasis on Galileo's experiments with telescopes and his observations of the sky.

Intellectual Curiosity and the Scientific Revolution

A Global Perspective

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Author: Toby E. Huff

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139495356

Category: Technology & Engineering

Page: N.A

View: 8106

Seventeenth-century Europe witnessed an extraordinary flowering of discoveries and innovations. This study, beginning with the Dutch-invented telescope of 1608, casts Galileo's discoveries into a global framework. Although the telescope was soon transmitted to China, Mughal India, and the Ottoman Empire, those civilizations did not respond as Europeans did to the new instrument. In Europe, there was an extraordinary burst of innovations in microscopy, human anatomy, optics, pneumatics, electrical studies, and the science of mechanics. Nearly all of those aided the emergence of Newton's revolutionary grand synthesis, which unified terrestrial and celestial physics under the law of universal gravitation. That achievement had immense implications for all aspects of modern science, technology, and economic development. The economic implications are set out in the concluding epilogue. All these unique developments suggest why the West experienced a singular scientific and economic ascendancy of at least four centuries.

The Scientific Revolution

An Encyclopedia

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Author: William E. Burns

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 0874368758

Category: Reference

Page: 386

View: 5369

An encyclopedic collection of key scientists and the tools and concepts they developed that transformed our understanding of the physical world. * Includes over 200 A–Z entries covering topics ranging from Gregorian reform of the calendar to Thomas Hobbes, navigation, thermometers, and the trial of Galileo * Provides a chronology of the scientific revolution from the founding of the Casa de la Contratacion, a repository of navigational and cartographic knowledge, in 1503, to the death of Antoni van Leeuwenhoek in 1727

The Scientific Revolution

The Essential Readings

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Author: Marcus Hellyer

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 047075477X

Category: Science

Page: 272

View: 5873

This book introduces students to the best recent writings on the Scientific Revolution of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Introduces students to the best recent writings on the Scientific Revolution of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Covers a wide range of topics including astronomy, science and religion, natural philosophy, technology, medicine and alchemy. Represents a broad range of approaches from the seminal to the innovative. Presents work by scholars who have been at the forefront of reinterpreting the Scientific Revolution.

Encyclopedia of the Scientific Revolution

From Copernicus to Newton

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Author: Wilbur Applebaum

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135582556

Category: History

Page: 800

View: 7737

With unprecedented current coverage of the profound changes in the nature and practice of science in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century Europe, this comprehensive reference work addresses the individuals, ideas, and institutions that defined culture in the age when the modern perception of nature, of the universe, and of our place in it is said to have emerged. Covering the historiography of the period, discussions of the Scientific Revolution's impact on its contemporaneous disciplines, and in-depth analyses of the importance of historical context to major developments in the sciences, The Encyclopedia of the Scientific Revolution is an indispensible resource for students and researchers in the history and philosophy of science.

Copernicus and his Successors

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Author: Edwards Rosen

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 0826441106

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 5337

The essays in Copernirus and his Successors deal both with the influences on Copernicus, including that of Greek and Arabic thinkers, and with his own life and attitudes. They also examine how he was seen by contemporaries and finally describe his relationship to other scientists, including Galileo, Brahe and Kepler.

Representing Space in the Scientific Revolution

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Author: David Marshall Miller

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107046734

Category: History

Page: 246

View: 5417

Using an integrated philosophical and historical approach, this book explores the fundamental shift in understandings of space in the scientific revolution.

The Scientific Revolution

A Historiographical Inquiry

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Author: H. F. Cohen

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226112800

Category: History

Page: 662

View: 9742

In this first book-length historiographical study of the Scientific Revolution, H. Floris Cohen examines the body of work on the intellectual, social, and cultural origins of early modern science. Cohen critically surveys a wide range of scholarship since the nineteenth century, offering new perspectives on how the Scientific Revolution changed forever the way we understand the natural world and our place in it. Cohen's discussions range from scholarly interpretations of Galileo, Kepler, and Newton, to the question of why the Scientific Revolution took place in seventeenth-century Western Europe, rather than in ancient Greece, China, or the Islamic world. Cohen contends that the emergence of early modern science was essential to the rise of the modern world, in the way it fostered advances in technology. A valuable entrée to the literature on the Scientific Revolution, this book assesses both a controversial body of scholarship, and contributes to understanding how modern science came into the world.

Reappraisals of the Scientific Revolution

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Author: David C. Lindberg,Robert S. Westman

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521348041

Category: Science

Page: 551

View: 7884

A compendium offering broad reflections on the Scientific Revolution from a spectrum of scholars engaged in the study of 16th and 17th century science. Many accepted views and interpretations of the scientific revolution are challenged.

What Galileo Saw

Imagining the Scientific Revolution

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Author: Lawrence Lipking

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 0801454840

Category: Science

Page: 312

View: 367

The Scientific Revolution of the seventeenth century has often been called a decisive turning point in human history. It represents, for good or ill, the birth of modern science and modern ways of viewing the world. In What Galileo Saw, Lawrence Lipking offers a new perspective on how to understand what happened then, arguing that artistic imagination and creativity as much as rational thought played a critical role in creating new visions of science and in shaping stories about eye-opening discoveries in cosmology, natural history, engineering, and the life sciences. When Galileo saw the face of the Moon and the moons of Jupiter, Lipking writes, he had to picture a cosmos that could account for them. Kepler thought his geometry could open a window into the mind of God. Francis Bacon's natural history envisioned an order of things that would replace the illusions of language with solid evidence and transform notions of life and death. Descartes designed a hypothetical "Book of Nature" to explain how everything in the universe was constructed. Thomas Browne reconceived the boundaries of truth and error. Robert Hooke, like Leonardo, was both researcher and artist; his schemes illuminate the microscopic and the macrocosmic. And when Isaac Newton imagined nature as a coherent and comprehensive mathematical system, he redefined the goals of science and the meaning of genius. What Galileo Saw bridges the divide between science and art; it brings together Galileo and Milton, Bacon and Shakespeare. Lipking enters the minds and the workshops where the Scientific Revolution was fashioned, drawing on art, literature, and the history of science to reimagine how perceptions about the world and human life could change so drastically, and change forever.

Copernicus' Secret

How the Scientific Revolution Began

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Author: Jack Repcheck

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 074328951X

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 239

View: 4174

Repcheck's riveting story tells of the enigmatic genius responsible for one of the most important scientific theories ever--and why it took several decades and a stranger's intervention before his groundbreaking "On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres" was published.

Third Culture

Beyond the Scientific Revolution

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Author: John Brockman

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 0684823446

Category: Science

Page: 416

View: 2399

This eye-opening look at the intellectual culture of today--in which science, not literature or philosophy, takes center stage in the debate over human nature and the nature of the universe--is certain to spark fervent intellectual debate.

Controversies Within the Scientific Revolution

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Author: Marcelo Dascal,Victor D. Boantza

Publisher: John Benjamins Publishing

ISBN: 9027218951

Category: History

Page: 287

View: 7783

From the beginning of the Scientific Revolution around the late sixteenth century to its final crystallization in the early eighteenth century, hardly an observational result, an experimental technique, a theory, a mathematical proof, a methodological principle, or the award of recognition and reputation remained unquestioned for long. The essays collected in this book examine the rich texture of debates that comprised the Scientific Revolution from which the modern conception of science emerged. Were controversies marginal episodes, restricted to certain fields, or were they the rule in the majority of scientific domains? To what extent did scientific controversies share a typical pattern, which distinguished them from debates in other fields? Answers to these historical and philosophical questions are sought through a close attention to specific controversies within and across the changing scientific disciplines as well as across the borders of the natural and the human sciences, philosophy, theology, and technology.

Blood Work: A Tale of Medicine and Murder in the Scientific Revolution

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Author: Holly Tucker

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393080420

Category: Science

Page: 336

View: 3711

“Excellent. . . . Tucker’s chronicle of the world of 17th-century science in London and Paris is fascinating.”—The Economist In December 1667, maverick physician Jean Denis transfused calf’s blood into one of Paris’s most notorious madmen. Days later, the madman was dead and Denis was framed for murder. A riveting exposé of the fierce debates, deadly politics, and cutthroat rivalries behind the first transfusion experiments, Blood Work takes us from dissection rooms in palaces to the streets of Paris, providing an unforgettable portrait of an era that wrestled with the same questions about morality and experimentation that haunt medical science today.

The Jewel House

Elizabethan London and the Scientific Revolution

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Author: Deborah E. Harkness

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 0300185758

Category: Science

Page: 384

View: 9408

This book explores the streets, shops, back alleys, and gardens of Elizabethan London, where a boisterous and diverse group of men and women shared a keen interest in the study of nature. These assorted merchants, gardeners, barber-surgeons, midwives, instrument makers, mathematics teachers, engineers, alchemists, and other experimenters Deborah Harkness contends formed a patchwork scientific community whose practices set the stage for the Scientific Revolution. While Francis Bacon has been widely regarded as the father of modern science, scores of his London contemporaries also deserve a share in this distinction. It was their collaborative, yet often contentious, ethos that helped to develop the ideals of modern scientific research. The book examines six particularly fascinating episodes of scientific inquiry and dispute in sixteenth-century London, bringing to life the individuals involved and the challenges they faced. These men and women experimented and invented, argued and competed, waged wars in the press, and struggled to understand the complexities of the natural world. Together their stories illuminate the blind alleys and surprising twists and turns taken as medieval philosophy gave way to the empirical, experimental culture that became a hallmark of the Scientific Revolution.