The Making of Black Revolutionaries

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Author: James Forman

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 9780295976594

Category: Political Science

Page: 568

View: 3271

This eloquent and provocative autobiography, originally published in 1972, records a day by day, sometimes hour by hour, compassionate account of the events that took place in the streets, meetings, churches, jails, and in people's hearts and minds in the 1960s civil rights movement. During the 1960s James Forman served as Executive Secretary and Director of International Affairs of the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. He is now Distinguished Adjunct Professor of Anthropology at American University in Washington, D.C., and President of the Unemployment and Poverty Action Committee. He is the author of six other books.

From Selma to Montgomery

The Long March to Freedom

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Author: Barbara Harris Combs

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1136173765

Category: History

Page: 228

View: 2200

On March 7, 1965, a peaceful voting rights demonstration in Selma, Alabama, was met with an unprovoked attack of shocking violence that riveted the attention of the nation. In the days and weeks following "Bloody Sunday," the demonstrators would not be deterred, and thousands of others joined their cause, culminating in the successful march from Selma to Montgomery. The protest marches led directly to the passage of the Voting Rights Act of 1965, a major piece of legislation, which, ninety-five years after the passage of the Fifteenth Amendment, made the practice of the right to vote available to all Americans, irrespective of race. From Selma to Montgomery chronicles the marches, placing them in the context of the long Civil Rights Movement, and considers the legacy of the Act, drawing parallels with contemporary issues of enfranchisement. In five concise chapters bolstered by primary documents including civil rights legislation, speeches, and news coverage, Combs introduces the Civil Rights Movement to undergraduates through the courageous actions of the freedom marchers.

Richard Wright

An Annotated Bibliography of Criticism and Commentary, 1983–2003

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Author: Keneth Kinnamon

Publisher: McFarland

ISBN: 1476609128

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 499

View: 8149

African-American writer Richard Wright (1908–1960) was celebrated during the early 1940s for his searing autobiography (Black Boy) and fiction (Native Son). By 1947 he felt so unwelcome in his homeland that he exiled himself and his family in Paris. But his writings changed American culture forever, and today they are mainstays of literature and composition classes. He and his works are also the subjects of numerous critical essays and commentaries by contemporary writers. This volume presents a comprehensive annotated bibliography of those essays, books, and articles from 1983 through 2003. Arranged alphabetically by author within years are some 8,320 entries ranging from unpublished dissertations to book-length studies of African American literature and literary criticism. Also included as an appendix are addenda to the author’s earlier bibliography covering the years from 1934 through 1982. This is the exhaustive reference for serious students of Richard Wright and his critics.

Black Power, Yellow Power, and the Making of Revolutionary Identities

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Author: Rychetta Watkins

Publisher: Univ. Press of Mississippi

ISBN: 1617031623

Category: Social Science

Page: 176

View: 4756

Images of upraised fists, afros, and dashikis have long dominated the collective memory of Black Power and its proponents. The “guerilla” figure-taking the form of the black-leather-clad revolutionary within the Black Panther Party-has become an iconic trope in American popular culture. That politically radical figure, however, has been shaped as much by Asian American cultural discourse as by African American political ideology. From the Asian-African Conference held in April of 1955 in Bandung, Indonesia, onward to the present, Afro-Asian political collaboration has been active and influential. In Black Power, Yellow Power, and the Making of Revolutionary Identities, author Rychetta Watkins uses the guerilla figure as a point of departure and shows how the trope’s rhetoric animates discourses of representation and identity in African American and Asian American literature and culture. In doing so, she examines the notion of “Power,” in terms of ethnic political identity, and explores collaborating-and sometimes competing-ethnic interests that have drawn ideas from the concept. The project brings together a range of texts-editorial cartoons, newspaper articles, novels, visual propaganda, and essays-that illustrate the emergence of this subjectivity in Asian American and African American cultural productions during the Power period, roughly 1966 through 1981. After a case study of the cultural politics of academic anthologies and the cooperation between Frank Chin and Ishmael Reed, the volume culminates with analyses of this trope in Sam Greenlee’s The Spook Who Sat by the Door, Alice Walker’s Meridian, and John Okada’s No No Boy.

For Freedom of Other Men

Civil Rights, Black Power, and the United Farm Workers, 1965-1973

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Author: Lauren Ashley Araiza

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Black power

Page: 300

View: 6130

"For Freedom of Other Men: Civil Rights, Black Power, and the United Farm Workers, 1965-1973," examines the participation of organizations from the Civil Rights and Black Power Movements in the strikes and boycotts began by the UFW. The organizations examined here are the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People, the Southern Christian Leadership Conference, the Urban League, and the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense. These organizations assisted the UFW in various capacities, including lending staff, sharing resources, walking picket lines, participating in boycotts, writing protest letters, and publicly declaring their support. The activities of these organizations on behalf of the farm workers serve as a case study to indicate the radicalism of each organization. Although each of these organizations sought African-American equality and empowerment, those that were truly radical were those that sought multi-racial equality, cooperation, and solidarity. In the case of the UFW, the most radical Civil Rights and Black Power organizations gave the most substantial support to the farm workers. But regardless of the amount of assistance provided, the aid given to the UFW demonstrates that, to different degrees, the major organizations of the Civil Rights and Black Power Movements were all concerned with the plight of Mexican-Americans. Furthermore, the actions of these organizations prove that both movements benefited all Americans, not just African-Americans, in concrete ways. However, when some of these organizations adopted a nationalistic stance and prioritized the concerns of African-Americans over those of other minorities, they became ineffectual and hastened their own demise.

Negro in the Making of America

Third Edition Revised, Updated, and Expanded

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Author: Benjamin Quarles,V.P. Franklin

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 0684818884

Category: History

Page: 414

View: 6214

This bestselling, definitive study of African Americans throughout history covers the full story of the African-American experience, from the arrival of slave ships in the early 1600s to the 20th century, when the black struggle for social and economic equality came to the forefront of American life. Included are portraits of such notable black figures as Nat Turner, Frederick Douglass, and Malcolm X.

Spectres of 1919

Class and Nation in the Making of the New Negro

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Author: Barbara Foley

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 9780252028465

Category: History

Page: 313

View: 742

"World War I and the Russian Revolution profoundly reshaped the American social landscape, with progressive reforms first halted and then reversed in the name of anti-Bolshevism. Dissent was stifled as labor activists and minority groups came under intense attack, culminating in the racist and antiradical violence of the "Red Summer" of 1919. Foley shows that African Americans had a significant relationship with the organized Left and that the New Negro movement's radical politics of race was also the politics of class."--BOOK JACKET.

The Oxford Illustrated History of the First World War

New Edition

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Author: Hew Strachan

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191640417

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 8710

The First World War, now a century ago, still shapes the world in which we live, and its legacy lives on, in poetry, in prose, in collective memory and political culture. By the time the war ended in 1918, millions lay dead. Three major empires lay shattered by defeat, those of Germany, Austria-Hungary, and the Ottomans. A fourth, Russia, was in the throes of a revolution that helped define the rest of the twentieth century. The Oxford History of the First World War brings together in one volume many of the most distinguished historians of the conflict, in an account that matches the scale of the events. From its causes to its consequences, from the Western Front to the Eastern, from the strategy of the politicians to the tactics of the generals, they chart the course of the war and assess its profound political and human consequences. Chapters on economic mobilization, the impact on women, the role of propaganda, and the rise of socialism establish the wider context of the fighting at sea and in the air, and which ranged on land from the trenches of Flanders to the mountains of the Balkans and the deserts of the Middle East. First published for the 90th anniversary of the 1918 Armistice, this highly illustrated revised edition contains significant new material to mark the 100th anniversary of the war's outbreak.

Slavery and the Making of America

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Author: James Oliver Horton,Lois E. Horton

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 0195304519

Category: History

Page: 254

View: 1282

The history of slavery is central to understanding the history of the United States. Slavery and the Making of America offers a richly illustrated, vividly written history that illuminates the human side of this inhumane institution, presenting it largely through stories of the slaves themselves. Readers will discover a wide ranging and sharply nuanced look at American slavery, from the first Africans brought to British colonies in the early seventeenth century to the end of Reconstruction. The authors document the horrors of slavery, particularly in the deep South, and describe the valiant struggles to escape bondage, from dramatic tales of slaves such as William and Ellen Craft to Dred Scott's doomed attempt to win his freedom through the Supreme Court. We see how slavery set our nation on the road of violence, from bloody riots that broke out in American cities over fugitive slaves, to the cataclysm of the Civil War. Along the way, readers meet such individuals as "Black Sam" Fraunces, a West Indian mulatto who owned the Queen's Head Tavern in New York City, a key meeting place for revolutionaries in the 1760s and 1770s and Sergeant William H. Carney, who won the Congressional Medal of Honor for his bravery at the crucial assault on Fort Wagner duringthe Civil War as well as Benjamin "Pap" Singleton, a former slave who led freed African Americans to a new life on the American frontier.

Patrick Pearse

The Making of a Revolutionary

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Author: J. Augusteijn

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 0230290698

Category: History

Page: 428

View: 9657

Patrick Pearse was not only leader of the 1916 Easter Rising but also one of the main ideologues of the IRA. Based on new material on his childhood and underground activities, this book places him in a European context and provides an intimate account of the development of his ideas on cultural regeneration, education, patriotism and militarism.

Eric Williams and the Making of the Modern Caribbean

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Author: Colin A. Palmer

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807888506

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 7049

Born in Trinidad, Eric Williams (1911-81) founded the Republic of Trinidad and Tobago's first modern political party in 1956, led the country to independence from the British culminating in 1962, and became the nation's first prime minister. Before entering politics, he was a professor at Howard University and wrote several books, including the classic Capitalism and Slavery. In the first scholarly biography of Williams, Colin Palmer provides insights into Williams's personality that illuminate his life as a scholar and politician and his tremendous influence on the historiography and politics of the Caribbean. Palmer focuses primarily on the fourteen-year period of struggles for independence in the Anglophone Caribbean. From 1956, when Williams became the chief minister of Trinidad and Tobago, to 1970, when the Black Power-inspired February Revolution brought his administration face to face with a younger generation intellectually indebted to his revolutionary thought, Williams was at the center of most of the conflicts and challenges that defined the region. He was most aggressive in advocating the creation of a West Indies federation to help the region assert itself in international political and economic arenas. Looking at the ideas of Williams as well as those of his Caribbean and African peers, Palmer demonstrates how the development of the modern Caribbean was inextricably intertwined with the evolution of a regional anticolonial consciousness.

To Wake the Nations

Race in the Making of American Literature

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Author: Eric J. Sundquist

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674893313

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 705

View: 3905

This powerful book argues that white culture in America does not exist apart from black culture. The revolution of the rights of man that established this country collided long ago with the system of slavery, and we have been trying to reestablish a steady course for ourselves ever since. To Wake the Nations is urgent and rousing: we have integrated our buses, schools, and factories, but not the canon of American literature. That is the task Eric Sundquist has assumed in a book that ranges from politics to literature, from Uncle Remus to African American spirituals. But the hallmark of this volume is a sweeping reevaluation of the glory years of American literature--from 1830 to 1930--that shows how white literature and black literature form a single interwoven tradition. By examining African America's contested relation to the intellectual and literary forms of white culture, Sundquist reconstructs the main lines of American literary tradition from the decades before the Civil War through the early twentieth century. An opening discussion of Nat Turner's "Confessions," recorded by a white man, Thomas Gray, establishes a paradigm for the complexity of meanings that Sundquist uncovers in American literary texts. Focusing on Frederick Douglass's autobiographical books, Herman Melville's Benito Cereno, Martin Delany's novel Blake; or the Huts of America, Mark Twain's Pudd'nhead Wilson, Charles Chesnutt's fiction, and W.E.B. Du Bois's The Souls of Black Folk and Darkwater, Sundquist considers each text against a rich background of history, law, literature, politics, religion, folklore, music, and dance. These readings lead to insights into components of the culture at large: slavery as it intersected with postcolonial revolutionary ideology; literary representations of the legal and political foundations of segregation; and the transformation of elements of African and antebellum folk consciousness into the public forms of American literature. "Almost certainly the finest book yet written on race and American literature," writes Arnold Rampersad of Princeton University. To Wake the Nations "amounts to a startlingly penetrating commentary on American culture, a commentary that should have a powerful impact on areas far beyond the texts investigated here."

Becoming King

Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Making of a National Leader

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Author: Troy Jackson

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 9780813125206

Category: History

Page: 248

View: 9977

"In Becoming King: Martin Luther King, Jr. and the Making of a National Leader, Troy Jackson chronicles King's emergence and effectiveness as a civil rights leader by examining his relationship with the people of Montgomery, Alabama. Using the sharp lens of Montgomery's struggle for racial equality to investigate King's burgeoning leadership. Drawing on countless interviews and archival sources and comparing King's sermons and religious writings before, during, and after the Montgomery bus boycott, Jackson demonstrates how King's voice and message evolved to reflect the shared struggles, challenges, experiences, and hopes of the people with whom he worked." --Book Jacket.

The Cambridge Illustrated History of France

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Author: Colin Jones

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521669924

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 4926

Explores the diversity of the French heritage and offers insight into the formation of the modern nation, in a history of France that includes features on places, people, and events

The Birth of a Nation

Nat Turner and the Making of a Movement

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Author: Nate Parker

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1501156586

Category: History

Page: 192

View: 4888

This tie-in to the film surveys the history and legacy of Nat Turner, the leader of one of the most renowned slave rebellions on American soil, while also exploring Turner's relevance to contemporary dialogues on race relations and offering commentary on the making of the film.

The Making of Portuguese Democracy

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Author: Kenneth Maxwell

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780521585965

Category: History

Page: 268

View: 3598

This vividly-written book is the first comprehensive assessment of the origins of the present-day democratic regime in Portugal to be placed in a broad international historical context. After a vibrant account of the collapse of the old regime in 1974, it studies the complex revolutionary period that followed, and the struggle in Europe and Africa to define the future role of Europe's then poorest country. International repercussions are examined and comparisons are drawn with the more general collapse of communism in the late 1980s.

New Jersey and the Revolutionary War

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Author: Alfred Hoyt Bill

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 9780813507606

Category: History

Page: 128

View: 6671

This is the complete account of New Jersey's important role in the American Revolutionary War, as only the accomplished novelist and historian Alfred Hoyt Bill could tell it. Not only does he survey the major military developments, but he also covers the social and economic effects of the war in New Jersey. Bill tells the story of the war and provides in-depth explanations of war-related problems--victory and defeat, Jerseymen defecting to the British, recruitment difficulties, troop discipline problems, the outbreak of disease and a smallpox epidemic--everything that led to the eventual surrender of Cornwallis. Bill introduces us to the people who were responsible for winning the war and shaping the future of our country, people such as George Washington, General Hugh Mercer, Thomas Paine, Alexander Hamilton, James Monroe, and Thomas Marshall. He also portrays other colorful figures, such as Benedict Arnold, and British officers, including Howe, Cornwallis, and Rall. Alfred Bill has produced that rare species of history book that reads like an exciting adventure story. He not only presents the facts, but clearly illumninates them with pertinent background information. Clearly written and highly readable, this book will be enjoyed by everyone from students to serious historians.

Up Against the Wall

Violence in the Making and Unmaking of the Black Panther Party

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Author: Curtis J. Austin

Publisher: University of Arkansas Press

ISBN: 9781557288271

Category: History

Page: 456

View: 2279

Curtis J. Austin's Up Against the Wall chronicles how violence brought about the founding of the Black Panther Party in 1966 by Huey P. Newton and Bobby Seale, dominated its policies, and brought about the party's destruction as one member after another--Eldridge Cleaver, Fred Hampton, Alex Rackley--left the party, was killed, or was imprisoned. Austin shows how the party's early emphasis in the 1960s on self-defense, though sorely needed in black communities at the time, left it open to mischaracterization, infiltration, and devastation by local, state, and federal police forces and government agencies. Austin carefully highlights the internal tension between advocates of a more radical position than the Panthers took, who insisted on military confrontation with the state and those, such as Newton and David Hilliard, who believed in making community organizing and alliance building their first priorities. Austin interviewed a number of party members who had heretofore remained silent. With the help of these stories, Austin is able to put the violent history of the party in perspective and show that the "survival" programs such as the Free Breakfast for Children program and Free Health Clinics helped the black communities they served to recognize their own bases of power and ability to save themselves.