Irish Women and Irish Migration

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Author: Patrick O'Sullivan

Publisher: Burns & Oates

ISBN: 9780718501150

Category: Ireland

Page: 238

View: 3217

For significant periods, the majority of Irish emigrants were women. This volume begins with an introduction which explores the connections between women's studies and Irish studies, and includes a women's history reinterpretation of the myths of the Wild Geese. Five chapters on the 19th century look at the motivations and work experiences of women emigrants to the United States, emigration schemes involving Irish pauper women, the experiences of Catholic and Protestant Irish women in Liverpool, and at female-headed households.

Migration and Gender in the Developed World

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Author: Paul Boyle,Keith Halfacree

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134695144

Category: Science

Page: 344

View: 8481

The subject of migration has traditionally been analysed through the lens of economic factors. The importance of adopting a gender sensitive perspective to academic work is now generally appreciated. Migration and Gender in the Developed World contains chapters from a diverse range of leading contributors who apply such a perspective to the study of migration in the countries of the developed world. Each chapter demonstrates how migration is highly gendered, with the experiences of women and men often varying markedly in different migration situations. The volume covers a wide range of migration issues and draws out the importance of gender issues in each area, including: dual career households regional migration patterns emigration from Ireland and Hong Kong elderly migration the migration decision-making process and the costs and benefits attached to migration Approaching the subject from a variety of academic traditions including Geography, Sociology and Social Policy, the volume combines both quantitative analysis of factual data and qualitative analysis of interview material to demonstrate the importance of studying migration through gender sensitive eyes.

The Irish in Ontario

A Study in Rural History

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Author: Donald Harman Akenson

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN: 9780773520295

Category: History

Page: 404

View: 5575

For most of the nineteenth century, the Irish formed the largest non-French ethnic group in central Canada and their presence was particularly significant in Ontario. This study presents a general discussion of the Irish in Ontario during the nineteenth century and a close analysis of the process of settlement and adaptation by the Irish in Leeds and Lansdowne township. Akenson argues that, despite the popular conception of the Irish as a city people, those who settled in Ontario were primarily rural and small-town dwellers. Though it is often claimed that the experience of the Irish in their homeland precluded their successful settlement on the frontier in North America, Akenson's research proves that the Irish migrants to Ontario not only chose to live chiefly in the hinterlands, but that they did so with marked success. Akenson also suggests that by using Ontario as an "historical laboratory" it is possible to make valid assessments of the real differences between Irish Protestants and Irish Catholics, characteristics which he contends are much more precisely measurable in the neutral environment of central Canada than in the turbulent Irish homeland. While Akenson is careful not to over-generalise his findings, he contends that the case of Ontario seriously calls into question conventional beliefs about the cultural limitations of the Irish Catholics not only in Canada but throughout North America. Donald Harman Akenson is professor of history at Queen's University and the author of numerous books on Irish history, includingIf the Irish Ran the Worldand the acclaimedConor: A Biography of Conor Cruise O'Brien. His most recent book is the groundbreakingSurpassing Wonder: The Invention of the Bible and the Talmuds.

Historical Dictionary of Ireland

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Author: Frank A. Biletz

Publisher: Scarecrow Press

ISBN: 0810870916

Category: History

Page: 640

View: 6370

This new edition of Historical Dictionary of Ireland is an excellent resource for discovering the history of Ireland. This is done through a chronology, an introductory essay, and an extensive bibliography. The cross-referenced dictionary section has over 600 entries on significant persons, places and events, political parties and institutions (including the Catholic church) with period forays into literature, music and the arts. This book is an excellent resource for students, researchers, and anyone wanting to know more about Ireland.

The Irish Diaspora

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Author: Andrew Bielenberg

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317878124

Category: History

Page: 376

View: 6071

This book brings together a series of articles which provide an overview of the Irish Diaspora from a global perspective. It combines a series of survey articles on the major destinations of the Diaspora; the USA, Britian and the British Empire. On each of these, there is a number of more specialist articles by historians, demographers, economists, sociologists and geographers. The inter-disciplinary approach of the book, with a strong historical and modern focus, provides the first comprehensive survey of the topic.

Ireland and Irish America

Culture, Class, and Transatlantic Migration

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Author: Kerby A. Miller

Publisher: Field Day Publications

ISBN: 0946755396

Category: Ireland

Page: 411

View: 5212

Between 1600 and 1929, perhaps seven million men and women left Ireland and crossed the Atlantic. Ireland and Irish America is concerned with Catholics and Protestants, rural and urban dwellers, men and women on both sides of that vast ocean. Drawing on over thirty years of research, in sources as disparate as emigrants' letters and demographic data, it recovers the experiences and opinions of emigrants as varied as the Rev. James McGregor, who in 1718 led the first major settlement of Presbyterians from Ulster to the New World, Mary Rush, a desperate refugee from the Great Famine in County Sligo, and Tom Brick, an Irish-speaking Kerryman on the American prairie in the early 1900s. Above all, Ireland and Irish America offers a trenchant analysis of mass migration's causes, its consequences, and its popular and political interpretations. In the process, it challenges the conventional 'two traditions' (Protestant versus Catholic) paradigm of Irish and Irish diasporan history, and it illuminates the hegemonic forces and relationships that governed the Irish and Irish-American worlds created and linked by transatlantic capitalism.

Wurzeln

Roman

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Author: Alex Haley

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9783596224487

Category:

Page: 717

View: 6547

The Irish Diaspora in Britain, 1750-1939

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Author: Donald M. MacRaild

Publisher: Macmillan International Higher Education

ISBN: 1137268034

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 2325

Until the 1950s, the Irish were by far the largest ethnic minority in Britain. This leading study focuses on the most important phase of Irish migration, providing an analytical discussion of why and how the Irish settled in such numbers. The Irish Diaspora in Britain, 1750-1939, second edition: • examines key aspects of the social, religious and political worlds of these migrants • explores both Catholic and Protestant immigrants • explains why they were so often the victims of native hostility • adopts a truly Britain-wide approach • draws upon the latest research and a wide range of printed primary sources. Thoroughly revised, updated and expanded, the new edition of this essential text broadens the analysis to 1939 and now features additional chapters on gender and the Irish diaspora in transnational perspective.

Irish Nationalists and the Making of the Irish Race

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Author: Bruce Nelson

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 0691153124

Category: History

Page: 333

View: 7396

This is a book about Irish nationalism and how Irish nationalists developed their own conception of the Irish race. Bruce Nelson begins with an exploration of the discourse of race--from the nineteenth--century belief that "race is everything" to the more recent argument that there are no races. He focuses on how English observers constructed the "native" and Catholic Irish as uncivilized and savage, and on the racialization of the Irish in the nineteenth century, especially in Britain and the United States, where Irish immigrants were often portrayed in terms that had been applied mainly to enslaved Africans and their descendants. Most of the book focuses on how the Irish created their own identity--in the context of slavery and abolition, empire, and revolution. Since the Irish were a dispersed people, this process unfolded not only in Ireland, but in the United States, Britain, Australia, South Africa, and other countries. Many nationalists were determined to repudiate anything that could interfere with the goal of building a united movement aimed at achieving full independence for Ireland. But others, including men and women who are at the heart of this study, believed that the Irish struggle must create a more inclusive sense of Irish nationhood and stand for freedom everywhere. Nelson pays close attention to this argument within Irish nationalism, and to the ways it resonated with nationalists worldwide, from India to the Caribbean.

The Cambridge Social History of Modern Ireland

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Author: Eugenio F. Biagini,Mary E. Daly

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107095581

Category: History

Page: 650

View: 5194

Covering three centuries of unprecedented demographic and economic changes, this textbook is an authoritative and comprehensive view of the shaping of Irish society, at home and abroad, from the famine of 1740 to the present day. The first major work on the history of modern Ireland to adopt a social history perspective, it focuses on the experiences and agency of Irish men, women and children, Catholics and Protestants, and in the North, South and the diaspora. An international team of leading scholars survey key changes in population, the economy, occupations, property ownership, class and migration, and also consider the interaction of the individual and the state through welfare, education, crime and policing. Drawing on a wide range of disciplinary approaches and consistently setting Irish developments in a wider European and global context, this is an invaluable resource for courses on modern Irish history and Irish studies.

The Irish in the New Communities

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Author: Patrick O'Sullivan

Publisher: Leicester University

ISBN: N.A

Category: Ireland

Page: 266

View: 1242

A series of case studies and theoretical chapters to continue the exploration of major themes within Irish migration studies. The emphasis is the migrant Irish relationship with the great cities of Britain, America and Australia. Includes a chapter about Butte, Montana, which had an Irish population of 8,000, out of a total of 30,000, in 1900.

The Irish in Post-War Britain

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Author: Enda Delaney

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 4877

Exploring the neglected history of Britain's largest migrant population, this new major historical study looks at the Irish in Britain after 1945. It reconstructs the histories of the lost generation who left independent Ireland in huge numbers to settle in Britain from the 1940s until the 1960s. Drawing on a wide range of previously neglected materials, Enda Delaney illustrates the complex process of negotiation and renegotiation that was involved in adapting and adjusting to lifein Britain. Less visible than other newcomers, it is widely assumed that the Irish assimilated with relative ease shortly after arrival. The Irish in Post-war Britain challenges this view, and shows that the Irish often perceived themselves to be outsiders, located on the margins of this theiradopted home. Many contemporaries frequently lumped all the Irish together as all being essentially the same, but Delaney argues the experiences of Britain's Irish population after the Second World War were much more diverse than previously assumed, and shaped by social class, geography and gender as well as nationality.This book's original approach demonstrates that any understanding of a migrant group must take account of both elements of the society that they had left, as well as the social landscape of their new country. Proximity ensured that even though these people had left Ireland, home as an imagined sense of place was never far away in the minds of those who had settled in Britain.

Making the Irish American

History and Heritage of the Irish in the United States

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Author: J.J. Lee,Marion R. Casey

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 081475208X

Category: History

Page: 733

View: 1875

Explores the history of the Irish in America, offering an overview of Irish history, immigration to the United States, and the transition of the Irish from the working class to all levels of society.

Ireland

The Emigrant Nursery and the World Economy

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Author: Jim Mac Laughlin

Publisher: Cork University Press

ISBN: 9781859180280

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 88

View: 4026

Irish Music Abroad

Diasporic Sounds in Birmingham

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Author: Angela Moran

Publisher: Cambridge Scholars Publishing

ISBN: 1443843806

Category: Music

Page: 225

View: 4566

Irish music enjoyed popularity across Europe and North America in the second half of the twentieth century. Regional circumstances created a unique reception for such music in the English Midlands. This book is a musical ethnography of Birmingham, 1950–2010. Initially establishing geographical and chronological parameters, the book cites Birmingham’s location at the hub of a road and communications network as key to the development of Irish music across a series of increasingly visible, public sites: Birmingham’s branch of Comhaltas Ceoltóirí Éireann was established in the domestic space of an amateur musician; Birmingham’s folk clubs encouraged a blend of Irish music with socialist politics, from which the Dublin singer Luke Kelly honed his trade; Irish solidarity was fostered in Birmingham’s churches. Each of these examples begins with a performance at Birmingham Town Hall in order to show how a single venue also provides musical representations that are mutable over time. The culmination is Birmingham’s St Patrick’s Parade. This, the largest Irish procession outside Dublin and New York, manifests an incoherent blend of sounds. The audio montage, nevertheless, creates a coherent metanarrative: one in which the local community has conquered a number of challenges (most especially that of the IRA bombings of the area) and has moved Irish music from private arenas to the centre of this large civic event.

The Cambridge Companion to Twentieth-Century British and Irish Women's Poetry

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Author: Jane Dowson

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 0521197856

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 208

View: 9643

This Companion is aimed at students and poetry enthusiasts wanting to deepen their knowledge of some of the finest modern poets. It provides new approaches to a wide range of influential women's poetry, a chronology and guide to further reading.

The Oxford Handbook of Modern Irish History

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Author: Alvin Jackson

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199549346

Category: History

Page: 640

View: 8554

Draws from a wide range of disciplines to bring together 36 leading scholars writing about 400 years of modern Irish history