The Color of Citizenship

Race, Modernity and Latin American / Hispanic Political Thought

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Author: Diego A. von Vacano

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199368880

Category: History

Page: 226

View: 8997

Looking to the way that race has been conceived through the tradition of Latin American political thought, The Color of Citizenship examines the centrality of race in the making of modern citizenship. It posits race as synthetic, dynamic, and fluid - a concept that will have methodological, historical, and normative value for understanding race in other diverse societies.

The Color of Success

Asian Americans and the Origins of the Model Minority

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Author: Ellen D. Wu

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400848873

Category: History

Page: 376

View: 3779

The Color of Success tells of the astonishing transformation of Asians in the United States from the "yellow peril" to "model minorities"--peoples distinct from the white majority but lauded as well-assimilated, upwardly mobile, and exemplars of traditional family values--in the middle decades of the twentieth century. As Ellen Wu shows, liberals argued for the acceptance of these immigrant communities into the national fold, charging that the failure of America to live in accordance with its democratic ideals endangered the country's aspirations to world leadership. Weaving together myriad perspectives, Wu provides an unprecedented view of racial reform and the contradictions of national belonging in the civil rights era. She highlights the contests for power and authority within Japanese and Chinese America alongside the designs of those external to these populations, including government officials, social scientists, journalists, and others. And she demonstrates that the invention of the model minority took place in multiple arenas, such as battles over zoot suiters leaving wartime internment camps, the juvenile delinquency panic of the 1950s, Hawaii statehood, and the African American freedom movement. Together, these illuminate the impact of foreign relations on the domestic racial order and how the nation accepted Asians as legitimate citizens while continuing to perceive them as indelible outsiders. By charting the emergence of the model minority stereotype, The Color of Success reveals that this far-reaching, politically charged process continues to have profound implications for how Americans understand race, opportunity, and nationhood.

The Color of the Land

Race, Nation, and the Politics of Landownership in Oklahoma, 1832-1929

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Author: David A. Chang

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807895764

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 4103

The Color of the Land brings the histories of Creek Indians, African Americans, and whites in Oklahoma together into one story that explores the way races and nations were made and remade in conflicts over who would own land, who would farm it, and who would rule it. This story disrupts expected narratives of the American past, revealing how identities--race, nation, and class--took new forms in struggles over the creation of different systems of property. Conflicts were unleashed by a series of sweeping changes: the forced "removal" of the Creeks from their homeland to Oklahoma in the 1830s, the transformation of the Creeks' enslaved black population into landed black Creek citizens after the Civil War, the imposition of statehood and private landownership at the turn of the twentieth century, and the entrenchment of a sharecropping economy and white supremacy in the following decades. In struggles over land, wealth, and power, Oklahomans actively defined and redefined what it meant to be Native American, African American, or white. By telling this story, David Chang contributes to the history of racial construction and nationalism as well as to southern, western, and Native American history.

The Color of Freedom

Race and Contemporary American Liberalism

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Author: David Carroll Cochran

Publisher: SUNY Press

ISBN: 9780791441855

Category: Political Science

Page: 207

View: 7930

Offers a fresh, distinctive, and compelling analysis of the United States's continuing dilemma of race.

Southern Institutes

Or, an Inquiry Into the Origin and Early Prevalence of Slavery and the Slave-trade, with an Analysis of the Laws, History, and Government of the Institution in the Principal Nations, Ancient and Modern, from the Earliest Ages Down to the Present Time, with Notes and Comments in Defence of the Southern Institutions

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Author: George S. Sawyer

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Slavery

Page: 381

View: 3457

The Color of Wealth

The Story Behind the U.S. Racial Wealth Divide

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Author: Barbara Robles,Betsy Leondar-Wright,Rose Brewer

Publisher: The New Press

ISBN: 1595585621

Category: Business & Economics

Page: 336

View: 3556

For every dollar owned by the average white family in the United States, the average family of color has less than a dime. Why do people of color have so little wealth? The Color of Wealth lays bare a dirty secret: for centuries, people of color have been barred by laws and by discrimination from participating in government wealth-building programs that benefit white Americans. This accessible book—published in conjunction with one of the country’s leading economics education organizations—makes the case that until government policy tackles disparities in wealth, not just income, the United States will never have racial or economic justice. Written by five leading experts on the racial wealth divide who recount the asset-building histories of Native Americans, Latinos, African Americans, Asian Americans, and European Americans, this book is a uniquely comprehensive multicultural history of American wealth. With its focus on public policies—how, for example, many post–World War II GI Bill programs helped whites only—The Color of Wealth is the first book to demonstrate the decisive influence of government on Americans’ net worth.

The Color of Liberty

Histories of Race in France

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Author: Sue Peabody

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 9780822331179

Category: History

Page: 384

View: 7562

DIVTraces the multiple histories of race and racial thinking over time in France and in Francophone areas of the globe./div

Under the Color of Law

The Bush Administration's Subversion of U.S. Constitutional and International Law in the War on Terror

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Author: Martin J. Henn

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 0739143298

Category: Law

Page: 282

View: 7465

"This will be the classic analysis of the legal aspects of the Bush wars. Martin Henn gives---first---a brilliant study of the Bush administration's orders and written opinions. On the other side, he presents the relevant details of the U.S. Constitution and applicable international laws. In this impressive and most careful consideration of all the significant documents on both sides, Under the Color of Law makes clear that the Bush administration was illegal, immoral, and inefficient in its 'war on terror.' Nothing else that I have seen on these matters is more important."---Sidney winn. University of South Florida and Temple University --

Say It Plain

A Century of Great African American Speeches

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Author: Catherine Ellis,Stephen Smith

Publisher: The New Press

ISBN: 1595587438

Category: Social Science

Page: 254

View: 1488

Say It Plain is a vivid, moving portrait of how black Americans have sounded the charge against injustice, exhorting the country to live up to its democratic principles. In “full-throated public oratory, the kind that can stir the soul” (Minneapolis Star Tribune), this unique anthology collects the transcribed speeches of the twentieth century’s leading African American cultural, literary, and political figures, many of them never before available in printed form. From an 1895 speech by Booker T. Washington to Julian Bond’s harp assessment of school segregation on the fiftieth anniversary of Brown v. Board in 2004, the collection captures a powerful tradition of oratory—by political activists, civil rights organizers, celebrities, and religious leaders—going back more than a century. The paperback edition includes the text of each speech along with an introduction placing it in its historical context. Say It Plain is a remarkable historical record—from the back-to-Africa movement to the civil rights era and the rise of black nationalism and beyond—riveting in its power to convey the black freedom struggle.

The Color of Politics: Racism in the American Political Arena Today

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Author: Chris Danielson

Publisher: ABC-CLIO

ISBN: 1440802769

Category: Political Science

Page: 249

View: 7428

This detailed analysis examines the role of race and racism in American politics since the 1980s, and contends that—despite the election of Barack Obama—the effects of white supremacy still divide American society and affect voter behavior today.

The color of social policy

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Author: King E. Davis,Tricia B. Bent-Goodley

Publisher: Council on Social Work Educ

ISBN: N.A

Category: Political Science

Page: 250

View: 3473

The Color of Christ

The Son of God and the Saga of Race in America

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Author: Edward J. Blum,Paul Harvey

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 0807837377

Category: Religion

Page: 352

View: 7435

How is it that in America the image of Jesus Christ has been used both to justify the atrocities of white supremacy and to inspire the righteousness of civil rights crusades? In The Color of Christ, Edward J. Blum and Paul Harvey weave a tapestry of American dreams and visions--from witch hunts to web pages, Harlem to Hollywood, slave cabins to South Park, Mormon revelations to Indian reservations--to show how Americans remade the Son of God visually time and again into a sacred symbol of their greatest aspirations, deepest terrors, and mightiest strivings for racial power and justice. The Color of Christ uncovers how, in a country founded by Puritans who destroyed depictions of Jesus, Americans came to believe in the whiteness of Christ. Some envisioned a white Christ who would sanctify the exploitation of Native Americans and African Americans and bless imperial expansion. Many others gazed at a messiah, not necessarily white, who was willing and able to confront white supremacy. The color of Christ still symbolizes America's most combustible divisions, revealing the power and malleability of race and religion from colonial times to the presidency of Barack Obama.

The Color of Democracy in Women's Regional Writing

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Author: Jean Carol Griffith

Publisher: University of Alabama Press

ISBN: 0817316612

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 217

View: 3415

An exciting addition to the ongoing debate about the place of regionalism in American literary history. American regionalism has become a contested subject in literary studies alongside the ubiquitous triad of race, class, and gender. The Color of Democracy in Women's Regional Writing enters into the heart of an ongoing debate in the field about the significance of regional fiction at the end of the 19th century. Jean Griffith presents the innovative view that regional writing provided Edith Wharton, Ellen Glasgow, and Willa Cather with the means to explore social transformation in a form of fiction already closely associated with women readers and writers. Griffith provides new readings of texts by these authors; she places them alongside the works of their contemporaries, including William Faulkner and Langston Hughes, to show regionalism's responses to the debate over who was capable of democratic participation and reading regionalism's changing mediations between natives and strangers as reflections of the changing face of democracy. This insightful work enriches the current debate about whether regionalism critiques hierarchies or participates in nationalist and racist agendas and will be of great interest to those invested in regional writing or the works of these significant authors.

Queering the Biopolitics of Citizenship in the Age of Obama

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Author: J. Rohrer

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137488204

Category: Political Science

Page: 85

View: 4810

The book from the interdisciplinary fields of queer theory, critical race theory, feminist political theory, disability studies, and indigenous studies to demonstrate that analyzing contemporary notions of citizenship requires understanding the machinations of governmentality and biopolitics in the (re)production of the proper citizen.

Journal of the Civil War Era

Summer 2014 Issue

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Author: William A. Blair

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469615983

Category: History

Page: 203

View: 6584

The Journal of the Civil War Era Volume 4, Number 2 June 2014 TABLE OF CONTENTS Tom Watson Brown Book Award John Fabian Witt Civil War Historians and the Laws of War Articles Chandra Manning Working for Citizenship in Civil War Contraband Camps Michael F. Conlin The Dangerous Isms and the Fanatical Ists: Antebellum Conservatives in the South and the North Confront the Modernity Conspiracy Nicholas Guyatt "An Impossible Idea?" The Curious Career of Internal Colonization Review Essay John Craig Hammond Slavery, Sovereignty, and Empires: North American Borderlands and the American Civil War, 1660-1860 Book Reviews Books Received Professional Notes Jill Ogline Titus An Unfinished Struggle: Sesquicentennial Interpretations of Slavery and Emancipation