The Art of Law in Shakespeare

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Author: Paul Raffield

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1509905480

Category: Law

Page: 288

View: 415

Through an examination of five plays by Shakespeare, Paul Raffield analyses the contiguous development of common law and poetic drama during the first decade of Jacobean rule. The broad premise of The Art of Law in Shakespeare is that the 'artificial reason' of law was a complex art form that shared the same rhetorical strategy as the plays of Shakespeare. Common law and Shakespearean drama of this period employed various aesthetic devices to capture the imagination and the emotional attachment of their respective audiences. Common law of the Jacobean era, as spoken in the law courts, learnt at the Inns of Court and recorded in the law reports, used imagery that would have been familiar to audiences of Shakespeare's plays. In its juridical form, English law was intrinsically dramatic, its adversarial mode of expression being founded on an agonistic model. Conversely, Shakespeare borrowed from the common law some of its most critical themes: justice, legitimacy, sovereignty, community, fairness, and (above all else) humanity. Each chapter investigates a particular aspect of the common law, seen through the lens of a specific play by Shakespeare. Topics include the unprecedented significance of rhetorical skills to the practice and learning of common law (Love's Labour's Lost); the early modern treason trial as exemplar of the theatre of law (Macbeth); the art of law as the legitimate distillation of the law of nature (The Winter's Tale); the efforts of common lawyers to create an image of nationhood from both classical and Judeo-Christian mythography (Cymbeline); and the theatrical device of the island as microcosm of the Jacobean state and the project of imperial expansion (The Tempest).

Shakespeare and the Legal Imagination

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Author: Ian Ward

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9780406988034

Category: Drama

Page: 241

View: 7083

This work offers an analysis of constitutional law, examining Shakespeare's plays as legal texts. Professor Ward uses the plays as a starting point to investigate the development of constitutional ideas such as sovereignty, commonwealth, conscience and moral law, and the art of government. In the developing area of law and literature, this book examines how Shakespeare's work offers a rich source of textual material on legal subjects.

Shakespearean Tragedy and the Common Law

The Art of Punishment

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Author: William M. Hawley

Publisher: Peter Lang Publishing

ISBN: 9780820438573

Category: Law

Page: 208

View: 7718

Shakespearean Tragedy and the Common Law examines punishment in Shakespeare's tragedies from the perspective of English Renaissance common law cases and theory. William Shakespeare's work is grounded conceptually in the artificial reason of common law as embodied by the great jurist of the age, Sir Edward Coke. Coke's legal rationale is sufficiently distinct from our own to suggest that a reasonable spectator in Renaissance England would interpret key elements of Shakespeare's art differently than we do today. Punishment, the sine qua non of these plays, is treated via a spectrum of legal theories: retribution, restitution, deterrence, and reform. Dr. Hawley's close examination of all ten plays and some fifty cases reveals how law, art, and philosophy shape Shakespeare's tragic vision.

Actors and Acting in Shakespeare's Time

The Art of Stage Playing

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Author: John H. Astington

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139788515

Category: Drama

Page: N.A

View: 8419

John Astington brings the acting style of the Shakespearean period to life, describing and analysing the art of the player in the English professional theatre between Richard Tarlton and Thomas Betterton. The book pays close attention to the cultural context of stage playing, the critical language used about it, and the kinds of training and professional practice employed in the theatre at various times over the course of roughly one hundred years - 1558–1660. Perfect for courses, this survey takes into account recent discoveries about actors and their social networks, about apprenticeship and company affiliations, and about playing outside the major centre of theatre, London. Astington considers the educational tradition of playing, in schools, universities, legal inns, and choral communities, in comparison to the work of the professional players. A comprehensive biographical dictionary of all major professional players of the Shakespearean period is included as a handy reference guide.

Transforming the Teaching of Shakespeare with the Royal Shakespeare Company

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Author: Joe Winston

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

ISBN: 1408184664

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 208

View: 5146

This book tells the story of the Royal Shakespeare Company's acclaimed and influential project to transform the teaching of Shakespeare in schools. It examines their approaches to making his plays more accessible, enjoyable and relevant to young people, describing the innovative classroom practices that the Company has pioneered and locating these within a clearly articulated theory of learning. It also provides evidence of their impact on children and young people's experience of Shakespeare, drawing upon original research as well as research commissioned by the RSC itself. Authoritative but highly readable, the book is relevant to anyone with an interest in the teaching of Shakespeare, and in how a major cultural organisation can have a real impact on the education of young people from a wide range of social backgrounds. It benefits from interviews with key policy makers and practitioners from within the RSC, including their legendary voice coach, Cicely Berry, and with internationally renowned figures such as the writer and academic, Jonathan Bate; the previous artistic director of the RSC, Michael Boyd; and the celebrated playwright, Tim Crouch.

The Cult of Authority

The Political Philosophy of the Saint-Simonians

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Author: G. Iggers

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9401031703

Category: Philosophy

Page: 224

View: 2875

There exists an extensive literature on the history of the Saint Simonian movement as well as on various phases of Saint-Simo nian economic, literary, aesthetic, feminist, and pacifist thought and activity. However, until the first edition of the present work, no larger study had undertaken an examination of the important topic of the political thought of the Saint-Simonians. This book attempts a systematic analysis of the political ideas of the Saint Simonians in the crucial years between 1828 and 1832 during which the Saint-Simonians, briefly organized as a well structured movement, formulated the diverse ideas of their master into a systematic doctrine. These were also the years of the greatest influence of the Saint-Simonians on the European public. After 1832 the Saint-Simonian movement dissolved into an informal fellowship of likeminded individuals and the tightly knit Saint Simonian doctrine into a set of loosely related ideas. This study uses as its main sources the rich collection of lectures, sermons, pamphlets, and newspapers published by the Saint-Simonians between 1828 and 1832. Except for minor corrections and an expanded bibliography, the present second edition is identical with the first. I have purposely eliminated the phrase, "A Chapter in the Intellectual History of Totalitarianism," from the subtitle.

Shakespeare's Humanism

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Author: Robin Headlam Wells

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 9781139447478

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: N.A

View: 1615

Renaissance humanists believed that if you want to build a just society you must begin with the facts of human nature. This book argues that the idea of a universal human nature was as important to Shakespeare as it was to every other Renaissance writer. In doing so it questions the central principle of post-modern Shakespeare criticism. Postmodernists insist that the notion of defining a human essence was alien to Shakespeare and his contemporaries; as radical anti-essentialists, the Elizabethans were, in effect, postmodernists before their time. In challenging this claim Shakespeare's Humanism shows that for Shakespeare, as for every other humanist writer in this period, the key to all wise action was 'the knowledge of our selves and our human condition'.

The Art of Solidarity in the Middle Ages

Guilds in England 1250-1550

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Author: Gervase Rosser

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191054577

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 5492

Guilds and fraternities, voluntary associations of men and women, proliferated in medieval Europe. The Art of Solidarity in the Middle Ages explores the motives and experiences of the many thousands of men and women who joined together in these family-like societies. Rarely confined to a single craft, the diversity of guild membership was of its essence. Setting the English evidence in a European context, this study is not an institutional history, but instead is concerned with the material and non-material aims of the brothers and sisters of the guilds. Gervase Rosser addresses the subject of medieval guilds in the context of contemporary debates surrounding the identity and fulfilment of the individual, and the problematic question of his or her relationship to a larger society. Unlike previous studies, The Art of Solidarity in the Middle Ages does not focus on the guilds as institutions but on the social and moral processes which were catalysed by participation. These bodies founded schools, built bridges, managed almshouses, governed small towns, shaped religious ritual, and commemorated the dead, perceiving that association with a fraternity would be a potential catalyst of personal change. Participants cultivated the formation of new friendships between individuals, predicated on the understanding that human fulfilment depended upon a mutually transformative engagement with others. The peasants, artisans, and professionals who joined the guilds sought to change both their society and themselves. The study sheds light on the conception and construction of society in the Middle Ages, and suggests further that this evidence has implications for how we see ourselves.

The Art of Literature

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Author: Arthur Schopenhauer

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN: 0486146081

Category: Literary Collections

Page: 128

View: 5173

Profound and witty, these essays by the noted philosopher analyze elements of literature and the literary scene. Schopenhauer's observations on style, criticism, reputation, and genius constitute a handbook on writing of enduring value.

Male Friendship in Shakespeare and his Contemporaries

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Author: Thomas MacFaul

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139464418

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: N.A

View: 5372

Renaissance Humanism developed a fantasy of friendship in which men can be absolutely equal to one another, but Shakespeare and other dramatists quickly saw through this rhetoric and developed their own ideas about friendship more firmly based on a respect for human difference. They created a series of brilliant and varied fictions for human connection, as often antagonistic as sympathetic, using these as a means for individuals to assert themselves in the face of social domination. Whilst the fantasy of equal and permanent friendship shaped their thinking, dramatists used friendship most effectively as a way of shaping individuality and its limitations. Dealing with a wide range of Shakespeare's plays and poems, and with many works of his contemporaries, this study gives readers a deeper insight into a crucial aspect of Shakespeare's culture and his use of it in art.

A Dictionary of the English Language

In which the Words are Deduced from Their Originals, Explained in Their Different Meanings, and Authorized by the Names of the Writers in Whose Works They are Found

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Author: Samuel Johnson

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: English language

Page: N.A

View: 6678

Open-Space Learning

A Study in Transdisciplinary Pedagogy

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Author: Nicholas Monk,Carol Chillington Rutter,Jonothan Neelands,Jonathan Heron

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 1849660549

Category: Drama

Page: 146

View: 6320

A resource for educators showing how the techniques of the theatrical rehearsal room can be effectively applied to other disciplines.

Shakespeare and His Contemporaries

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Author: J. Hart

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 0230118143

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 254

View: 9013

This book is concerned with language, genre, drama, and literary and historical narrative and examines the comedy of Shakespeare in the context of comedies from Italy, Spain, and France in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries.

Law and the Arts

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Author: Hofstra University

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780313308055

Category: Art

Page: 256

View: 3229

This interdisciplinary study examines the relationships between law and the humanities. On the one side, chapters focus attention on legal restraints in the media, censorship of the arts, copyright protection on the Internet, and artists' rights in the past and in the present cyberspace era. On the other, the role played by law in literature and the theatre is explored, and one essay examines the architectural design of the U.S. Supreme Court and how its architect fit into political history.

The Art of Dramatic Writing

Its Basis in the Creative Interpretation of Human Motives

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Author: Lajos Egri

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 9781439123799

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 320

View: 9362

Amid the hundreds of "how-to" books that have appeared in recent years, there have been very few which attempted to analyze the mysteries of play-construction. This book does that -- and its principles are so valid that they apply equally well to the short story, novel and screenplay. Lajos Egri examines a play from the inside out, starting with the heart of any drama: its characters. For it is people -- their private natures and their inter-relationships -- that move a story and give it life. All good dramatic writing depends upon an understanding of human motives. Why do people act as they do? What forces transform a coward into a hero, a hero into a coward? What is it that Romeo does early in Shakespeare's play that makes his later suicide seem inevitable? Why must Nora leave her husband at the end of A Doll's House? These are a few of the fascinating problems which Egri analyzes. He shows how it is essential for the author to have a basic premise -- a thesis, demonstrated in terms of human behavior -- and to develop his dramatic conflict on the basis of that behavior. Premise, character, conflict: this is Egri's ABC. His book is a direct, jargon-free approach to the problem of achieving truth in a literary creation.

The Art of Scandal

Modernism, Libel Law, and the Roman a Clef

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Author: Sean Latham

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199701784

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 202

View: 8779

The Art of Scandal advances a relatively simple claim with far-reaching consequences for modernist studies: writers and readers throughout the early twentieth century revived the long-despised codes and habits of the roman ? clef as a key part of that larger assault on Victorian realism we now call modernism. In the process, this resurgent genre took on a life of its own, reconfiguring the intricate relationship between literature, celebrity, and the law. Latham uses the genre to reconfigure modernism's development as a cultural practice diffused across texts and the networks of reception and circulation in which they are embedded. Writers like James Joyce, Jean Rhys, Oscar Wilde, and D.H. Lawrence deliberately employed elements of the roman ? clef, only to find that it possessed an uncanny and even dangerous agency of its own--one that resonated through a complex system of publicity and constraint. Bringing these effects fully into view requires a mixture of close reading and archival excavation that proceeds here in chapters on the anonymous case study, Oscar Wilde's trial, libel law, celebrity salons, and Parisian bohemia. The Art of Scandal thus both salvages the roman ? clef and traces its weird itinerary through the early twentieth century. In the process, it elaborates an expansive concept of modernism that interweaves coterie culture with the mass media, psychology with celebrity, and literature with the law.

Edinburgh Companion to Shakespeare and the Arts

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Author: Mark Thornton Burnett

Publisher: Edinburgh University Press

ISBN: 0748649344

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 588

View: 7133

This authoritative and innovative volume explores the place of Shakespeare in relation to a wide range of artistic practices and activities, past and present.