The Alps: A Human History from Hannibal to Heidi and Beyond

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Author: Stephen O'Shea

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393634191

Category: Travel

Page: 304

View: 606

A thrilling blend of contemporary travelogue and historical narrative about the Alps from “a graceful and passionate writer” (Washington Post). For centuries the Alps have seen the march of armies, the flow of pilgrims and Crusaders, the feats of mountaineers, and the dreams of engineers?and some 14 million people live among their peaks today. In The Alps, Stephen O’Shea takes readers up and down these majestic mountains, battling his own fear of heights to journey through a 500-mile arc across France, Italy, Switzerland, Liechtenstein, Germany, Austria, and Slovenia. O’Shea, whose style has been hailed for its “engaging combination of candid first-person travel writing and absorbing historical narrative” (Chicago Sun-Times), whisks readers along more than 2,000 years of Alpine history. As he travels pass-by-pass through the mountains, he tells great stories of those (real and imagined) who have passed before him, from Hannibal to Hitler, Frankenstein’s monster to Sherlock Holmes, Napoleon to Nietzsche, William Tell to James Bond. He explores the circumstances behind Hannibal and his elephants’ famous crossing in 218 BCE; he reveals how the Alps have profoundly influenced culture from Heidi to The Sound of Music; and he visits iconic sites, including the Reichenbach Falls, where Arthur Conan Doyle staged Sherlock Holmes’s death scene with Professor Moriarty; Caporetto, the bloody site of the Italians’ retreat in World War I; and the Eagle’s Nest, Hitler’s aerie of a vacation home. O’Shea delves into Alpine myths and legends, such as the lopsided legs of the dahu, the fictitious goatlike creature of the mountains, and reveals why the beloved St. Bernard dog is so often depicted with a cask hanging below its neck. Throughout, he immerses himself in the communities he visits, engagingly recounting his adventures with contemporary road trippers, watchmakers, salt miners, cable-car operators, and yodelers.

Back to the Front

An Accidental Historian Walks the Trenches of World War 1

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Author: Stephen O'Shea

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 9780802719096

Category: History

Page: 216

View: 5021

World War I is beyond the memory of almost everyone alive today. Yet it has left as deep a scar on the imaginative landscape of our century as it has on the land where it was fought. Nowhere is that more evident than on the Western Front-the sinuous, deadly line of trenches that stretched from the coast of Belgium to the border of France and Switzerland, a narrow swath of land in which so many million lives were lost. For journalist Stephen O'Shea, the legacy of the Great War is personal (both his grandfathers fought on the front lines) and cultural. Stunned by viewing the "immense wound" still visible on the battlefield of the Somme, and feeling that "history is too important to be left to the professionals," he set out to walk the entire 450 miles through no-man's-land to discover for himself and for his generation the meaning of the war. Back to the Front is a remarkable combination of vivid history and opinionated travel writing. As his walk progresses, O'Shea recreates the shocking battles of the Western Front, many now legendary-Passchendaele, the Somme, the Argonne, Verdun-and offers an impassioned perspective on the war, the state of the land, and the cultivation of memory. His consummate skill with words and details brings alive the players, famous and faceless, on that horrific stage, and makes us aware of why the Great War, indeed history itself, still matters. An evocative fusion of past and present, Back to the Front will resonate, for all who read it, as few other books on war ever have.

Iceman

Uncovering the Life and Times of a Prehistoric Man Found in an Alpine Glacier

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Author: Brenda Fowler

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 9780226258232

Category: Social Science

Page: 315

View: 7089

Featuring a new Afterword, this is the spectacular story of the 1991 discovery of a Stone Age man in the Alps, a lonely frozen figure who offers clues about the world of 3000 B.C. 33 halftones.

History of the Alps, 1500-1900

Environment, Development, and Society

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Author: Jon Mathieu

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781933202341

Category: History

Page: 260

View: 8923

In the 1700s, Jean-Jacques Rousseau celebrated the Alps as the quintessence of the triumph of nature over the "horrors" of civilization. Now available in English, History of the Alps, 1500-1900: Environment, Development, and Society provides a precise history of one of the greatest mountain range systems in the world. Jon Mathieu's work disproves a number of commonly held notions about the Alps, positioning them as neither an inversion of lowland society nor a world apart with respect to Europe. Mathieu's broad historical portrait addresses both the economic and sociopolitical--exploring the relationship between population levels, development, and the Alpine environment, as well as the complex links between agrarian structure, society, and the development of modern civilization. More detailed analysis examines the relationship between various agrarian structures and shifting political configurations, several aspects of family history between the late Middle Ages and the turn of the twentieth century, and exploration of the Savoy, Grisons, and Carinthia regions.

The Alps

A Cultural History

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Author: Andrew Beattie

Publisher: Oxford University Press on Demand

ISBN: 9780195309553

Category: History

Page: 246

View: 7381

The Alps are Europe's highest mountain range: their broad arc stretches right across the center of the continent, encompassing a wide range of traditions and cultures. Andrew Beattie explores the turbulent past and vibrant present of this landscape, where early pioneers of tourism, mountaineering, and scientific research, along with the enduring legacies of historical regimes from the Romans to the Nazis, have all left their mark.

Sea of Faith

Islam and Christianity in the Medieval Mediterranean World

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Author: Stephen O'Shea

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 0802718426

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 8085

In Sea of Faith, O'Shea chronicles both the meeting of minds and the collisions of armies that marked the interaction of Cross and Crescent in the Middle Ages-the better to understand their apparently intractable conflict today. For all the great and everlasting moments of cultural interchange and tolerance-in Cordoba, Palermo, Constantinople-the ultimate "geography of belief " was decided on the battlefield. O'Shea vividly recounts seven pivotal battles between the forces of Christianity and Islam that shaped the Mediterranean world-from the loss of the Christian Middle East to the Muslims at Yarmuk (Turkey) in 636 to the stemming of the seemingly unstoppable Ottoman tide at Malta in 1565. In between, the battles raged round the Mediterranean, from Poitiers in France and Hattin in the Holy Land during the height of the Crusades, to the famed contest for Constantinople in 1453 that signaled the end of Byzantium. As much as the armies were motivated by belief, their exploits were inspired by leaders such as Charles Martel, Saladin, and Mehmet II, whose stirring feats were sometimes accompanied by unexpected changes of heart.

Mountain Lines

A Journey through the French Alps

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Author: Jonathan Arlan

Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing, Inc.

ISBN: 1510709762

Category: Travel

Page: 264

View: 7171

A New York Times best summer travel book recommendation A nonfiction debut about an American’s solo, month-long, 400-mile walk from Lake Geneva to Nice. In the summer of 2015, Jonathan Arlan was nearing thirty. Restless, bored, and daydreaming of adventure, he comes across an image on the Internet one day: a map of the southeast corner of France with a single red line snaking south from Lake Geneva, through the jagged brown and white peaks of the Alps to the Mediterranean sea—a route more than four hundred miles long. He decides then and there to walk the whole trail solo. Lacking any outdoor experience, completely ignorant of mountains, sorely out of shape, and fighting last-minute nerves and bad weather, things get off to a rocky start. But Arlan eventually finds his mountain legs—along with a staggering variety of aches and pains—as he tramps a narrow thread of grass, dirt, and rock between cloud-collared, ice-capped peaks in the High Alps, through ancient hamlets built into hillsides, across sheep-dotted mountain pastures, and over countless cols on his way to the sea. In time, this simple, repetitive act of walking for hours each day in the remote beauty of the mountains becomes as exhilarating as it is exhausting. Mountain Lines is the stirring account of a month-long journey on foot through the French Alps and a passionate and intimate book laced with humor, wonder, and curiosity. In the tradition of trekking classics like A Short Walk in the Hindu Kush, The Snow Leopard, and Tracks, the book is a meditation on movement, solitude, adventure, and the magnetic power of the natural world.

Hannibal's Oath

The Life and Wars of Rome's Greatest Enemy

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Author: John Prevas

Publisher: Da Capo Press

ISBN: 0306824256

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 336

View: 9475

According to the ancient sources, Hannibal was nine years old when his father led him to the temple at Carthage and dipped the young boy's hands in the blood of the sacrificial victim. Before those gods, Hannibal swore an oath of eternal hatred toward Rome. Few images in history have managed to capture and hold the popular imagination quite like that of Hannibal, the fearless North African, perched on a monstrous elephant, leading his mercenaries over the Alps, and then, against all odds, descending the ice-covered peaks to challenge Rome in her own backyard for mastery of the ancient world. It was a bold move, and it established Hannibal as one of history's greatest commanders. But this same brilliant tactician is also one of history's most tragic figures; fate condemned him to win his battles but not his war against Rome. An internationally recognized expert on Hannibal for nearly thirty years, historian John Prevas has visited every Hannibal-related site and mountain pass, from Tunisia to Italy, Spain to Turkey, seeking evidence to dispel the myths surrounding Hannibal's character and his wars. Hannibal's Oath is an easily readable yet comprehensive biography of this iconic military leader--an epic account of a monumental and tragic life.

The Friar of Carcassonne

Revolt Against the Inquisition in the Last Days of the Cathars

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Author: Stephen O'Shea

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 0802778011

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 2538

In 1300, the French region of Languedoc had been cowed under the authority of both Rome and France since Pope Innocent III 's Albigensian Crusade nearly a century earlier. That crusade almost wiped out the Cathars, a group of heretical Christians whose beliefs threatened the authority of the Catholic Church. But decades of harrowing repression-enforced by the ruthless Pope Boniface VIII , the Machiavellian French King Philip the Fair of France, and the pitiless grand inquisitor of Toulouse, Bernard Gui (the villain in The Name of the Rose)-had bred resentment. In the city of Carcassonne, anger at the abuses of the Inquisition reached a boiling point and a great orator and fearless rebel emerged to unite the resistance among Cathar and Catholic alike. The people rose up, led by the charismatic Franciscan friar Bernard Délicieux and for a time reclaimed control of their lives and communities. Having written the acclaimed chronicle of the Cathars The Perfect Heresy , Stephen O'Shea returns to the medieval world to chronicle a rare and remarkable story of personal courage and principle standing up to power, amidst the last vestiges of the endlessly fascinating Cathar world. Praise for The Perfect Heresy : "At once a cautionary tale about the corruption of temporal power...and an accounting of the power of faith ...It is also just a darn good read."-Baltimore Sun "An accessible, readable history with lessons ...that were not learned by broad humanity until it saw 20th-century tyrants applying the goals and methods of the Inquisition on a universal scale."-New York Times

Geology of the Alps

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Author: O. Adrian Pfiffner

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1118708113

Category: Science

Page: 392

View: 8202

The Alps, with their outstanding outcrop conditions, represent a superb natural laboratory for many geological processes, and have played a crucial role in the history of geology. This book gives an up-to-date and holistic overview of the key aspects of Alpine geology. After a brief presentation of the plate tectonic framework, the rock suites are discussed, starting with the pre-Triassic crystalline basement, followed by Paleozoic, Mesozoic and Cenozoic sedimentary sequences. The lithological description of the rock types is supplemented by a discussion of their paleogeographic and plate tectonic contexts. The book goes on to describe the structure of the Alps (including the Jura Mountains and the Alpine foreland to the north and south) illustrated by numerous cross-sections. The evolution of the Alps as a mountain chain incorporates a discussion of the Alpine metamorphic history and a compilation of orogenic timetables. The final sections cover the evolution of Alpine drainage patterns and the region’s glacial history. Readership: The book is essential reading for students and lecturers on Alpine courses and excursions, and all earth-scientists interested in the geology of the region.

Backroads & Byways of Georgia (First Edition) (Backroads & Byways)

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Author: David B. Jenkins

Publisher: The Countryman Press

ISBN: 1581575416

Category: Travel

Page: 304

View: 1136

A road guide to the Peach State Georgia’s varying but always lovely landscapes have long made its roads some of the most well-travelled and much-loved in the country. Backroads & Byways of Georgia offers twenty-five of the best short and long rides the state has to offer. Take a ride down through historic Savannah and the Atlantic Coastal Plain in the south, or cruise along the Appalachians in the northwest, or catch sight of the sublime Blue Ridge Mountains of Georgia’s northeast. At the intersection of so much geographical diversity, Georgia makes a remarkable driver’s getaway, always with something new to discover—whether you’re looking to get lost in its abundant natural beauty or experience the cityscapes of Atlanta or Columbus. As with all of our Backroads & Byways titles, this book equips you with itineraries appropriate for visits of differing durations and in different seasons, tips for comfortable accommodations, great food, and good shopping too.

The Not-Quite States of America: Dispatches from the Territories and Other Far-Flung Outposts of the USA

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Author: Doug Mack

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393247619

Category: Travel

Page: 320

View: 8062

An eye-opening journey to the most overlooked parts of America. Everyone knows that America is 50 states and…some other stuff. Scattered shards in the Pacific and the Caribbean, the not-quite states—American Samoa, Guam, Puerto Rico, the Northern Mariana Islands, and the U.S. Virgin Islands—and their 4 million people are often forgotten, even by most Americans. But they’re filled with American flags, U.S. post offices, and Little League baseball games. How did these territories come to be part of the United States? What are they like? And why aren’t they states? When Doug Mack realized just how little he knew about the territories, he set off on a globe-hopping quest covering more than 30,000 miles to see them all. In the U.S. Virgin Islands, Mack examines the Founding Fathers’ arguments over expansion. He explores Polynesia’s outsize influence on American culture, from tiki bars to tattoos, in American Samoa. He tours Guam with members of a military veterans’ motorcycle club, who offer personal stories about the territory’s role in World War II and its present-day importance for the American military. In the Northern Mariana Islands, he learns about star-guided seafaring from one of the ancient tradition’s last practitioners. And everywhere he goes in Puerto Rico, he listens in on the lively debate over political status—independence, statehood, or the status quo. The Not-Quite States of America is an entertaining account of the territories’ place in the USA, and it raises fascinating questions about the nature of empire. As Mack shows, the territories aren’t mere footnotes to American history; they are a crucial part of the story.

How the English Made the Alps

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Author: Jim Ring

Publisher: Faber & Faber

ISBN: 0571276490

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 6852

For English read British which is not to quibble with the title but, as Jim Ring himself explains, 'During the period on which this book focuses, it was the custom - in the words of a Scot - ''to let the part - the larger part - speak for the whole.'' Those countries which received them - France, Italy, Austria, Germany, and above all Switzerland - all talked of the English, and the presence of the English in the Alps was precisely so described. To use the term British would thus have been an anachronism.' The nineteenth century will forever be associated with the growth of the British Empire, but nearer home there was a quieter conquest taking place. Gradually the English were taking over the Alps, scaling their peaks, driving railways through them, and introducing both winter sports and those quintessential English institutions - tea, baths, lawn tennis and churches - to remote mountain villages. Jim Ring tells the remarkable story of the English love affair with the Alps, from its beginnings with the Romantic movement, when poets such as Byron and Shelly wrote of the mountains with awed delight, through the great days of the 1850s and 1860s and the formation of the Alpine Club, to the inter-war years when the English assured the future prosperity of the alpine resorts by virtually inventing and then popularizing downhill-skiing. Part history, part biography, How the English made the Alps brings the characters - the artists, the scientists, the gentleman-adventurers, the invalids, the aristocrats, eccentrics and mountain-scramblers - vividly to life. 'Jim Rings's book cannot be bettered.' Daily Mail 'Fascinating' Stephen Venables, Daily Telegraph 'Evocative and entertaining' Financial Times 'A comprehensive, well-written account of a fascinating subject' Guardian

Pride of Carthage

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Author: David Anthony Durham

Publisher: Anchor

ISBN: 9780307276995

Category: Fiction

Page: 592

View: 5167

This epic retelling of the legendary Carthaginian military leader’s assault on the Roman empire begins in Ancient Spain, where Hannibal Barca sets out with tens of thousands of soldiers and 30 elephants. After conquering the Roman city of Saguntum, Hannibal wages his campaign through the outposts of the empire, shrewdly befriending peoples disillusioned by Rome and, with dazzling tactics, outwitting the opponents who believe the land route he has chosen is impossible. Yet Hannibal’s armies must take brutal losses as they pass through the Pyrenees mountains, forge the Rhone river, and make a winter crossing of the Alps before descending to the great tests at Cannae and Rome itself. David Anthony Durham draws a brilliant and complex Hannibal out of the scant historical record–sharp, sure-footed, as nimble among rivals as on the battlefield, yet one who misses his family and longs to see his son grow to manhood. Whether portraying the deliberations of a general or the calculations of a common soldier, vast multilayered scenes of battle or moments of introspection when loss seems imminent, Durham brings history alive.

Escape by Bike

Adventure Cycling, Bikepacking and Touring Off-Road

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Author: Joshua Cunningham

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780500293508

Category:

Page: 264

View: 7910

A practical and inspirational guide to planning every kind of off-road cycling, from nearby "microadventures" to global itineraries, drawing on the author's own epic journeys

Beyond Human

Fully Identified in the New Creation

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Author: Justin Paul Abraham

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780994433558

Category:

Page: N.A

View: 5063

We stand fully identified in the new creation renewed in knowledge according to the pattern of the exact image of our Creator (Col 3:10, MIR). There is a Voice calling us as a species back to the Blueprint of our Design. A Voice calling us out of ignorance into an expansive future beyond our wildest dreams. A future beyond the limitations of space and time, the mind and the physical body. A future "Beyond Human."

The Maze

A Desert Journey

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Author: Lucy Rees

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780816518319

Category: History

Page: 198

View: 1904

Author Lucy Rees and a companion travel across the Arizona desert to the Hopi Indian mesas, where they search for an ancient stone carving similar to one in their native Wales. The stone's intricate design becomes a purpose for their trek as well as a metaphor for the journey itself. Humorous and wise, the book is both a bold adventure and a moving account of tragedy and hope.

Alp

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Author: Olaf Unverzart

Publisher: Prestel Pub

ISBN: 9783791349954

Category: Photography

Page: 192

View: 3207

An accomplished young photographer, Olaf Unverzart, takes on an age-old subject and transforms the way we see the Alps. Much more than another collection of nature photographs, this volume is a powerful reminder of the ramifications of human intervention toward Earth's most majestic features--a story told without ideology or didactics, through the eyes of a keen and hopeful observer.

A Florence Diary

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Author: Diana Athill

Publisher: House of Anansi

ISBN: 1487002211

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 80

View: 6723

In August 1947, Diana Athill travelled to Florence by the Golden Arrow train for a two-week holiday with her cousin Pen. In this playful diary of that trip, delightfully illustrated with photographs of the period, Athill recorded her observations and adventures — eating with (and paid for by) the hopeful men they meet on their travels, admiring architectural sights, sampling delicious pastries, eking out their budget, and getting into scrapes. Written with an arresting immediacy and infused with an exhilarating joie de vivre, A Florence Diary is a bright, colourful evocation of a time long lost and a vibrant portrait of a city that will be deliciously familiar to any contemporary traveller.