Reading the Forested Landscape

A Natural History of New England

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Author: Tom Wessels

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780881504200

Category: Nature

Page: 199

View: 1963

Chronicles the forest in New England from the Ice Age to current challenges

Forest Forensics: A Field Guide to Reading the Forested Landscape

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Author: Tom Wessels

Publisher: The Countryman Press

ISBN: 1581578571

Category: Nature

Page: 160

View: 2123

Take some of the mystery out of a walk in the woods with this new field guide from the author of Reading the Forested Landscape. Thousands of readers have had their experience of being in a forest changed forever by reading Tom Wessels's Reading the Forested Landscape. Was this forest once farmland? Was it logged in the past? Was there ever a major catastrophe like a fire or a wind storm that brought trees down? Now Wessels takes that wonderful ability to discern much of the history of the forest from visual clues and boils it all down to a manageable field guide that you can take out to the woods and use to start playing forest detective yourself. Wessels has created a key—a fascinating series of either/or questions—to guide you through the process of analyzing what you see. You’ll feel like a woodland Sherlock Holmes. No walk in the woods will ever be the same.

Stone by Stone

The Magnificent History in New England's Stone Walls

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Author: Robert Thorson

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 9780802719201

Category: History

Page: 224

View: 2265

There once may have been 250,000 miles of stone walls in America's Northeast, stretching farther than the distance to the moon. They took three billion man-hours to build. And even though most are crumbling today, they contain a magnificent scientific and cultural story-about the geothermal forces that formed their stones, the tectonic movements that brought them to the surface, the glacial tide that broke them apart, the earth that held them for so long, and about the humans who built them. Stone walls layer time like Russian dolls, their smallest elements reflecting the longest spans, and Thorson urges us to study them, for each stone has its own story. Linking geological history to the early American experience, Stone by Stone presents a fascinating picture of the land the Pilgrims settled, allowing us to see and understand it with new eyes.

Reading the Landscape of America

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Author: May Theilgaard Watts

Publisher: Nature Study Guild Publishers

ISBN: 9780912550237

Category: Science

Page: 354

View: 1743

In this natural history classic, the author takes the reader on field trips to landscapes across America, both domesticated and wild. She shows how to read the stories written in the land, interpreting the clues laid down by history, culture, and natural forces. A renowned teacher, writer and conservationist in her native Midwest, Watts studied with Henry Cowles, the pioneering American ecologist. She was the first to explain his theories of plant succesion to the general public. Her graceful, witty essays, with charming illustrations by the author, are still relevant and engaging today, as she invites us to see the world around us with fresh eyes.

Forests in Time

The Environmental Consequences of 1,000 Years of Change in New England

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Author: David R. Foster

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300115376

Category: History

Page: 477

View: 3509

The Eastern Hemlock, massive and majestic, has played a unique role in structuring northeastern forest environments, from Nova Scotia to Wisconsin and through the Appalachian Mountains to North Carolina, Tennessee, and Alabama. A "foundation species” influencing all the species in the ecosystem surrounding it, this iconic North American tree has long inspired poets and artists as well as naturalists and scientists. Five thousand years ago, the hemlock collapsed as a result of abrupt global climate change. Now this iconic tree faces extinction once again because of an invasive insect, the hemlock woolly adelgid. Drawing from a century of studies at Harvard University’s Harvard Forest, one of the most well-regarded long-term ecological research programs in North America, the authors explore what hemlock’s modern decline can tell us about the challenges facing nature and society in an era of habitat changes and fragmentation, as well as global change.

The Myth of Progress

Toward a Sustainable Future

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Author: Tom Wessels

Publisher: UPNE

ISBN: 1611684161

Category: Science

Page: 155

View: 4374

A provocative critique of Western progress from a scientific perspective

Kaufman Field Guide to Nature of New England

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Author: Kenn Kaufman,Kimberly Kaufman

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 061845697X

Category: Nature

Page: 416

View: 5358

Presents an illustrated field guide to the plants, wildlife, night sky, and natural environments of New England.

Trees of New England

A Natural History

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Author: Charles Fergus,Amelia Hansen

Publisher: Falcon Guides

ISBN: 9780762737956

Category: Nature

Page: 313

View: 6940

"Trees of New England is a natural history of the more than seventy tree species that grow in New England. The book includes detailed illustrations and range maps"--Provided by publisher.

The Granite Landscape

A Natural History of America's Mountain Domes, from Acadia to Yosemite

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Author: Tom Wessels,Brian D. Cohen

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780881505283

Category: Nature

Page: 208

View: 1972

Chronicles and illustrates the natural history of North America's granite summits, introducing the origins of granite domes and mountains in Yosemite National Park, New York's Adirondack Mountains, and Maine's Acadia National Park.

New England Forests Through Time

Insights from the Harvard Forest Dioramas

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Author: David R. Foster,John F. O'Keefe

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: Nature

Page: 67

View: 6285

Over the past three hundred years New England's landscape has been transformed. The forests were cleared; the land was farmed intensively through the mid-nineteenth century and then was allowed to reforest naturally as agriculture shifted west. Today, in many ways the region is more natural than at any time since the American Revolution. This fascinating natural history is essential background for anyone interested in New England's ecology, wildlife, or landscape. In New England Forests through Time these historical and environmental lessons are told through the world-renowned dioramas in Harvard's Fisher Museum. These remarkable models have introduced New England's landscape to countless visitors and have appeared in many ecology, forestry, and natural history texts. This first book based on the dioramas conveys the phenomenal history of the land, the beauty of the models, and new insights into nature.

Reading Rural Landscapes: A Field Guide to New England's Past

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Author: Robert Stanford

Publisher: Tilbury House Publishers and Cadent Publishing

ISBN: 0884483703

Category: Nature

Page: 256

View: 7684

William Faulkner once said, "The past is never dead. It's not even past." Nowhere can you see the truth behind his comment more plainly than in rural New England, especially Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, and western Massachusetts. Everywhere we go in rural New England, the past surrounds us. In the woods and fields and along country roads, the traces are everywhere if we know what to look for and how to interpret what we see. A patch of neglected daylilies marks a long-abandoned homestead. A grown-over cellar hole with nearby stumps and remnants of stone wall and orchard shows us where a farm has been reclaimed by forest. And a piece of a stone dam and wooden sluice mark the site of a long-gone mill. Although slumping back into the landscape, these features speak to us if we can hear them and they can guide us to ancestral homesteads and famous sites. Lavishly illustrated with drawings and color photos. Provides the keys to interpret human artifacts in fields, woods, and roadsides and to reconstruct the past from surviving clues. Perfect to carry in a backpack or glove box. A unique and valuable resource for road trips, genealogical research, naturalists, and historians.

The Changing Nature of the Maine Woods

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Author: Andrew M. Barton,Alan S. White,Charles V. Cogbill

Publisher: UPNE

ISBN: 1611682959

Category: Nature

Page: 349

View: 5162

The ecology of the ever-changing Maine forest

Granite, Fire, and Fog

The Natural and Cultural History of Acadia

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Author: Tom Wessels

Publisher: University Press of New England

ISBN: 1512600458

Category: Nature

Page: 168

View: 5960

Acadia National Park, on Maine's Mount Desert Island, is among the most popular national parks in the United States. From the road, visitors can experience magnificent vistas of summit and sea, but on a more intimate scale, equally compelling views abound along Acadia's hiking trails. Tom Wessels, an ecologist, naturalist, and avid hiker, attributes the park's popularity-and its unusual beauty-to the unique way in which earth, air, fire, and water-in the form of glacially scoured granite, winter winds, fire, and ocean fog-have converged to create a landscape that can be found nowhere else. In this beautifully illustrated book, Wessels invites readers to investigate the remarkable natural history of Mount Desert Island, along with the unique cultural story it gave rise to. This account of nature, terrain, and human interaction with the landscape will delight those who like to hike these bald summits, ride along the carriage roads, or explore the island's rugged shoreline. Wessels concludes with a guided tour of one of his favorite hikes, a ten-mile loop that will acquaint the reader with the diverse ecosystems described throughout his book.

A Sierra Club Naturalist's Guide to Southern New England

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Author: Neil Jorgensen

Publisher: Random House (NY)

ISBN: N.A

Category: Science

Page: 417

View: 3546

Identifies characteristic plants and animals in diverse ecological communities in New England, exploring the interrelationships among flora, fauna, and geology

The Nature of Vermont

Introduction and Guide to a New England Environment

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Author: Charles W. Johnson

Publisher: UPNE

ISBN: 1611681316

Category: Nature

Page: 372

View: 5243

An up-to-date overview of Vermont's geological, natural, and land use histories, in the context of past, present, and future human interactions with the landscape

The Nature of New Hampshire

Natural Communities of the Granite State

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Author: Daniel D. Sperduto,Ben Kimball

Publisher: University of New Hampshire

ISBN: 9781584658986

Category: Nature

Page: 341

View: 1048

A beautifully illustrated guide to New Hampshire's natural landscapes

The Sierra Club Guide to the Ancient Forests of the Northeast

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Author: Bruce Kershner,Robert T. Leverett

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781578050666

Category: Nature

Page: 276

View: 9712

Showcases 134 forests across nine northeastern states, offering helpful recommendations on where to go, how to get there, and what to see of approximately 400,000 acres of ancient forests that are still thriving in the region. Original.

The Wild Trees

A Story of Passion and Daring

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Author: Richard Preston

Publisher: Random House

ISBN: 9781588366030

Category: Science

Page: 320

View: 4152

Hidden away in foggy, uncharted rain forest valleys in Northern California are the largest and tallest organisms the world has ever sustained–the coast redwood trees, Sequoia sempervirens. Ninety-six percent of the ancient redwood forests have been destroyed by logging, but the untouched fragments that remain are among the great wonders of nature. The biggest redwoods have trunks up to thirty feet wide and can rise more than thirty-five stories above the ground, forming cathedral-like structures in the air. Until recently, redwoods were thought to be virtually impossible to ascend, and the canopy at the tops of these majestic trees was undiscovered. In The Wild Trees, Richard Preston unfolds the spellbinding story of Steve Sillett, Marie Antoine, and the tiny group of daring botanists and amateur naturalists that found a lost world above California, a world that is dangerous, hauntingly beautiful, and unexplored. The canopy voyagers are young–just college students when they start their quest–and they share a passion for these trees, persevering in spite of sometimes crushing personal obstacles and failings. They take big risks, they ignore common wisdom (such as the notion that there’s nothing left to discover in North America), and they even make love in hammocks stretched between branches three hundred feet in the air. The deep redwood canopy is a vertical Eden filled with mosses, lichens, spotted salamanders, hanging gardens of ferns, and thickets of huckleberry bushes, all growing out of massive trunk systems that have fused and formed flying buttresses, sometimes carved into blackened chambers, hollowed out by fire, called “fire caves.” Thick layers of soil sitting on limbs harbor animal and plant life that is unknown to science. Humans move through the deep canopy suspended on ropes, far out of sight of the ground, knowing that the price of a small mistake can be a plunge to one’s death. Preston’s account of this amazing world, by turns terrifying, moving, and fascinating, is an adventure story told in novelistic detail by a master of nonfiction narrative. The author shares his protagonists’ passion for tall trees, and he mastered the techniques of tall-tree climbing to tell the story in The Wild Trees–the story of the fate of the world’s most splendid forests and of the imperiled biosphere itself. From the Hardcover edition.

Thoreau's Country

Journey through a Transformed Landscape

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Author: David R. Foster,Henry David Thoreau

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674037151

Category: Social Science

Page: 288

View: 2356

In 1977 David Foster took to the woods of New England to build a cabin with his own hands. Along with a few tools he brought a copy of the journals of Henry David Thoreau. Foster was struck by how different the forested landscape around him was from the one Thoreau described more than a century earlier. The sights and sounds that Thoreau experienced on his daily walks through nineteenth-century Concord were those of rolling farmland, small woodlands, and farmers endlessly working the land. As Foster explored the New England landscape, he discovered ancient ruins of cellar holes, stone walls, and abandoned cartways--all remnants of this earlier land now largely covered by forest. How had Thoreau's open countryside, shaped by ax and plough, divided by fences and laneways, become a forested landscape? Part ecological and historical puzzle, this book brings a vanished countryside to life in all its dimensions, human and natural, offering a rich record of human imprint upon the land. Extensive excerpts from the journals show us, through the vividly recorded details of daily life, a Thoreau intimately acquainted with the ways in which he and his neighbors were changing and remaking the New England landscape. Foster adds the perspective of a modern forest ecologist and landscape historian, using the journals to trace themes of historical and social change. Thoreau's journals evoke not a wilderness retreat but the emotions and natural history that come from an old and humanized landscape. It is with a new understanding of the human role in shaping that landscape, Foster argues, that we can best prepare ourselves to appreciate and conserve it today. From the journal: "I have collected and split up now quite a pile of driftwood--rails and riders and stems and stumps of trees--perhaps half or three quarters of a tree...Each stick I deal with has a history, and I read it as I am handling it, and, last of all, I remember my adventures in getting it, while it is burning in the winter evening. That is the most interesting part of its history. It has made part of a fence or a bridge, perchance, or has been rooted out of a clearing and bears the marks of fire on it...Thus one half of the value of my wood is enjoyed before it is housed, and the other half is equal to the whole value of an equal quantity of the wood which I buy." --October 20, 1855

Nature Next Door

Cities and Trees in the American Northeast

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Author: Ellen Stroud

Publisher: University of Washington Press

ISBN: 0295804459

Category: Nature

Page: 192

View: 6337

The once denuded northeastern United States is now a region of trees. Nature Next Door argues that the growth of cities, the construction of parks, the transformation of farming, the boom in tourism, and changes in the timber industry have together brought about a return of northeastern forests. Although historians and historical actors alike have seen urban and rural areas as distinct, they are in fact intertwined, and the dichotomies of farm and forest, agriculture and industry, and nature and culture break down when the focus is on the history of Northeastern woods. Cities, trees, mills, rivers, houses, and farms are all part of a single transformed regional landscape. In an examination of the cities and forests of the northeastern United States-with particular attention to the woods of Maine, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, and Vermont-Ellen Stroud shows how urbanization processes there fostered a period of recovery for forests, with cities not merely consumers of nature but creators as well. Interactions between city and hinterland in the twentieth century Northeast created a new wildness of metropolitan nature: a reforested landscape intricately entangled with the region's cities and towns.