A History of Blacks in Kentucky: In pursuit of equality, 1890-1980

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Author: N.A

Publisher: University Press of Kentucky

ISBN: 9780916968212

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 4968

" Published by the Kentucky Historical Society & Distributed by the University Press of Kentucky This is the second part of a two-volume study which covers the entire spectrum of the black experience in Kentucky from earliest exploration and settlement to 1980. (Click here for information on the first volume, From Slavery to Segregation, 1760-1891.) Mandated and partially funded by the Kentucky General Assembly in 1978, this pathbreaking work is the most comprehensive consideration of the subject ever undertaken. It fills a long-recognized void in Kentucky history. George C. Wright describes the struggle of blacks in the twentieth century to achieve the promise of political, social, and economic equality. From the rising tide of racism and violence at the turn of the century to the civil rights movement and school integration in later decades, Wright describes the accomplishments, frustrations, and defeats suffered by the race, concluding that even in 1980 only a few blacks had actually achieved the long-sought toal of equality.

African Americans Confront Lynching

Strategies of Resistance from the Civil War to the Civil Rights Era

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Author: Christopher Waldrep

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780742552739

Category: Social Science

Page: 201

View: 2943

This book examines African Americans' strategies for resisting white racial violence from the Civil War until the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., in 1968 and up to the Clinton era. Christopher Waldrep's semi-biographical approach to the pioneers in the anti-lynching campaign portrays African Americans as active participants in the effort to end racial violence rather than as passive victims. In telling this more than 100-year-old story of violence and resistance, Waldrep describes how white Americans legitimized racial violence after the Civil War, and how black journalists campaigned against the violence by invoking the Constitution and the law as a source of rights. He shows how, toward the end of the nineteenth century and into the twentieth, anti-lynching crusaders Ida B. Wells and Monroe Work adopted a more sociological approach, offering statistics and case studies to thwart white claims that a black propensity for crime justified racial violence. Waldrep describes how the NAACP, founded in 1909, represented an organized, even bureaucratic approach to the fight against lynching. Despite these efforts, racial violence continued after World War II, as racists changed tactics, using dynamite more than the rope or the gun. Waldrep concludes by showing how modern day hate crimes continue the lynching tradition, and how the courts and grass-roots groups have continued the tradition of resistance to racial violence. A rich selection of documents helps give the story a sense of immediacy. Sources include nineteenth-century eyewitness accounts of lynching, courtroom testimony of Ku Klux Klan victims, South Carolina senator Ben Tillman's 1907 defense of lynching, and the text of the first federal hate crimes law."

Lynched

The Victims of Southern Mob Violence

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Author: Amy Kate Bailey,Stewart E. Tolnay

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 146962088X

Category: Social Science

Page: 296

View: 6664

On July 9, 1883, twenty men stormed the jail in Morehouse Parish, Louisiana, kidnapped Henderson Lee, a black man charged with larceny, and hanged him. Events like this occurred thousands of times across the American South in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, yet we know scarcely more about any of these other victims than we do about Henderson Lee. Drawing on new sources to provide the most comprehensive portrait of the men and women lynched in the American South, Amy Bailey and Stewart Tolnay's revealing profiles and careful analysis begin to restore the identities of--and lend dignity to--hundreds of lynching victims about whom we have known little more than their names and alleged offenses. Comparing victims' characteristics to those of African American men who were not lynched, Bailey and Tolnay identify the factors that made them more vulnerable to being targeted by mobs, including how old they were; what work they did; their marital status, place of birth, and literacy; and whether they lived in the margins of their communities or possessed higher social status. Assessing these factors in the context of current scholarship on mob violence and reports on the little-studied women and white men who were murdered in similar circumstances, this monumental work brings unprecedented clarity to our understanding of lynching and its victims.

The Tragedy of Lynching

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Author: Arthur F. Raper

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 146964021X

Category: History

Page: 508

View: 1493

This book deals with the quest for a preventive to lynching which can be undertaken only after one has an understanding of what it is that is to be prevented. This necessary analysis of lynching--its background, circumstances, and meaning--introduces many baffling elements. The author has made a detailed study of the lynchings of 1930 in an effort to find an answer to the complexities of the problem. Originally published in 1933. A UNC Press Enduring Edition -- UNC Press Enduring Editions use the latest in digital technology to make available again books from our distinguished backlist that were previously out of print. These editions are published unaltered from the original, and are presented in affordable paperback formats, bringing readers both historical and cultural value.

Southern Horrors

Women and the Politics of Rape and Lynching

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Author: Crystal Nicole Feimster

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674035621

Category: History

Page: 314

View: 2191

Between 1880 and 1930, close to 200 women were murdered by lynch mobs in the American South. Many more were tarred and feathered, burned, whipped, or raped. In this brutal world of white supremacist politics and patriarchy, a world violently divided by race, gender, and class, black and white women defended themselves and challenged the male power brokers. Crystal Feimster breaks new ground in her story of the racial politics of the postbellum South by focusing on the volatile issue of sexual violence. Pairing the lives of two Southern womenâe"Ida B. Wells, who fearlessly branded lynching a white tool of political terror against southern blacks, and Rebecca Latimer Felton, who urged white men to prove their manhood by lynching black men accused of raping white womenâe"Feimster makes visible the ways in which black and white women sought protection and political power in the New South. While Wells was black and Felton was white, both were journalists, temperance women, suffragists, and anti-rape activists. By placing their concerns at the center of southern politics, Feimster illuminates a critical and novel aspect of southern racial and sexual dynamics. Despite being on opposite sides of the lynching question, both Wells and Felton sought protection from sexual violence and political empowerment for women. Southern Horrors provides a startling view into the Jim Crow South where the precarious and subordinate position of women linked black and white anti-rape activists together in fragile political alliances. It is a story that reveals how the complex drama of political power, race, and sex played out in the lives of Southern women.

Popular Justice

A History of Lynching in America

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Author: Manfred Berg

Publisher: Government Institutes

ISBN: 9781566639200

Category: History

Page: 232

View: 6210

Manfred Berg traces the history of lynching in America from the colonial era to the present. Berg focuses on lynching as extralegal communal punishment performed by "ordinary" people. He confronts racially fragmented historical memory and legacies of popular justice to help the reader make better sense of lynching as part of American history.

Thirty Years of Lynching in the United States, 1889-1918

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Author: National Association for the Advancement of Colored People

Publisher: Lawbook Exchange Limited

ISBN: 9781584779650

Category: Law

Page: 105

View: 9810

COMPREHENSIVE STUDY OF LYNCHING Published by the NAACP in 1919 to promote awareness of lynching in the United States, this seminal study provides information on the lynchings of 3,224 African-Americans between 1889 and 1918. With a new introduction by noted slave historian, Paul Finkelman. "The book reprinted here is one of the most comprehensive studies of lynching in U.S. history. The NAACP data shows that most lynchings were not about interracial sex-the great paranoia of the southern white Americans. Many blacks were lynched because they had allegedly committed murders. However, many of these "murderers" were never tried and the evidence against them was speculative at best. But other blacks were lynched for no apparent reason, or for some minor transgression of social and racial rules-as understood by whites-such as 'inflammatory language, ' 'insulting remarks to a white woman, ' 'being disreputable, ' or just 'race prejudice.' This last cause-racial prejudice-was indeed at the root of almost all lynchings of African-Americans." -- Paul Finkelman, Introduction CONTENTS Summation of the Facts Disclosed in Tables The Story of One Hundred Lynchings Appendix I-Analyses of Number of Persons Lynched Appendix II-Chronological List of Persons Lynched in United States 1889 to 1918, Inclusive, Arranged by State

Scottsboro

A Tragedy of the American South

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Author: Dan T. Carter

Publisher: LSU Press

ISBN: 9780807135235

Category: History

Page: 432

View: 1169

Although Scottsboro disappeared from the nation's headlines after 1937, it returned with the telecast of the 1976 "docudrama," Judge Horton and the Scottsboro Boys. Based on Dan Carter's Bancroft Prize-winning account of the controversial Alabama incident and its aftermath, the television production served as a catalyst for the return to public life of three key individuals in the case. In a chapter written especially for this revised edition of his modern classic, Carter recounts the latest turns in the case. Included are the surprising story of the last surviving Scottsboro defendant and the vivid description of Victoria Prices' libel suit against the network that televised the drama and the subsequent trial -- presumably the last of the Scottsboro trials. Along with this new material Carter provides fresh personal and historical insights into the case and reflects on the way the South has changed since Scottsboro first claimed the nation's attention.

On Lynchings

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Author: Ida B. Wells-Barnett

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN: 0486779998

Category: History

Page: 176

View: 9974

Three pamphlets by a civil rights pioneer chronicle some of the most regrettable incidents in American history. Wells's meticulous research and documentation of crimes from the 1890s offer priceless historical testimony.

Asian American Sexual Politics

The Construction of Race, Gender, and Sexuality

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Author: Rosalind S. Chou

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 1442209240

Category: Social Science

Page: 200

View: 8705

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Pink Think: Becoming a Woman in Many Uneasy Lessons

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Author: Lynn Peril

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company

ISBN: 0393323544

Category: Social Science

Page: 235

View: 2461

A pop-culture history of the quest for ideal feminine expression traces the advice of marketing experts from the 1940s to the 1970s, during which women were pressured to adhere to stereotypical roles, in a volume that displays period artifacts and memorabilia. Original. 30,000 first printing.

The City on the Hill From Below

The Crisis of Prophetic Black Politics

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Author: Stephen Marshall

Publisher: Temple University Press

ISBN: 1439906556

Category: Philosophy

Page: 235

View: 5002

Within the discipline of American political science and the field of political theory, African American prophetic political critique as a form of political theorizing has been largely neglected. Stephen Marshall, in The City on the Hill from Below, interrogates the political thought of David Walker, Frederick Douglass, W. E. B. DuBois, James Baldwin, and Toni Morrison to reveal a vital tradition of American political theorizing and engagement with an American political imaginary forged by the City on the Hill. Originally articulated to describe colonial settlement, state formation, and national consolidation, the image of the City on the Hill has been transformed into one richly suited to assessing and transforming American political evil. The City on the Hill from Below shows how African American political thinkers appropriated and revised languages of biblical prophecy and American republicanism.

The Light of Truth

Writings of an Anti-Lynching Crusader

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Author: Ida B. Wells

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 0698141830

Category: History

Page: 624

View: 9862

The broadest and most comprehensive collection of writings available by an early civil and women’s rights pioneer Seventy-one years before Rosa Parks’s courageous act of resistance, police dragged a young black journalist named Ida B. Wells off a train for refusing to give up her seat. The experience shaped Wells’s career, and—when hate crimes touched her life personally—she mounted what was to become her life’s work: an anti-lynching crusade that captured international attention. This volume covers the entire scope of Wells’s remarkable career, collecting her early writings, articles exposing the horrors of lynching, essays from her travels abroad, and her later journalism. The Light of Truth is both an invaluable resource for study and a testament to Wells’s long career as a civil rights activist. For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators. From the Trade Paperback edition.

The Making of African America

The Four Great Migrations

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Author: Ira Berlin

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 1101189894

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 5908

A leading historian offers a sweeping new account of the African American experience over four centuries Four great migrations defined the history of black people in America: the violent removal of Africans to the east coast of North America known as the Middle Passage; the relocation of one million slaves to the interior of the antebellum South; the movement of more than six million blacks to the industrial cities of the north and west a century later; and since the late 1960s, the arrival of black immigrants from Africa, the Caribbean, South America, and Europe. These epic migra­tions have made and remade African American life. Ira Berlin's magisterial new account of these passages evokes both the terrible price and the moving triumphs of a people forcibly and then willingly migrating to America. In effect, Berlin rewrites the master narrative of African America, challenging the traditional presentation of a linear path of progress. He finds instead a dynamic of change in which eras of deep rootedness alternate with eras of massive move­ment, tradition giving way to innovation. The culture of black America is constantly evolving, affected by (and affecting) places as far away from one another as Biloxi, Chicago, Kingston, and Lagos. Certain to gar­ner widespread media attention, The Making of African America is a bold new account of a long and crucial chapter of American history.

Lynching in America

A History in Documents

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Author: Christopher Waldrep

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814784801

Category: History

Page: 281

View: 3619

Whether conveyed through newspapers, photographs, or Billie Holliday’s haunting song “Strange Fruit,” lynching has immediate and graphic connotations for all who hear the word. Images of lynching are generally unambiguous: black victims hanging from trees, often surrounded by gawking white mobs. While this picture of lynching tells a distressingly familiar story about mob violence in America, it is not the full story. Lynching in America presents the most comprehensive portrait of lynching to date, demonstrating that while lynching has always been present in American society, it has been anything but one-dimensional. Ranging from personal correspondence to courtroom transcripts to journalistic accounts, Christopher Waldrep has extensively mined an enormous quantity of documents about lynching, which he arranges chronologically with concise introductions. He reveals that lynching has been part of American history since the Revolution, but its victims, perpetrators, causes, and environments have changed over time. From the American Revolution to the expansion of the western frontier, Waldrep shows how communities defended lynching as a way to maintain law and order. Slavery, the Civil War, and especially Reconstruction marked the ascendancy of racialized lynching in the nineteenth century, which has continued to the present day, with the murder of James Byrd in Jasper, Texas, and Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas’s contention that he was lynched by Congress at his confirmation hearings. Since its founding, lynching has permeated American social, political, and cultural life, and no other book documents American lynching with historical texts offering firsthand accounts of lynchings, explanations, excuses, and criticism.

Lynching and Spectacle

Witnessing Racial Violence in America, 1890-1940

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Author: Amy Louise Wood

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807878118

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 2180

Lynch mobs in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century America exacted horrifying public torture and mutilation on their victims. In Lynching and Spectacle, Amy Wood explains what it meant for white Americans to perform and witness these sadistic spectacles and how lynching played a role in establishing and affirming white supremacy. Lynching, Wood argues, overlapped with a variety of cultural practices and performances, both traditional and modern, including public executions, religious rituals, photography, and cinema, all which encouraged the horrific violence and gave it social acceptability. However, she also shows how the national dissemination of lynching images ultimately fueled the momentum of the antilynching movement and the decline of the practice. Using a wide range of sources, including photos, newspaper reports, pro- and antilynching pamphlets, early films, and local city and church records, Wood reconfigures our understanding of lynching's relationship to modern life. Wood expounds on the critical role lynching spectacles played in establishing and affirming white supremacy at the turn of the century, particularly in towns and cities experiencing great social instability and change. She also shows how the national dissemination of lynching images fueled the momentum of the antilynching movement and ultimately led to the decline of lynching. By examining lynching spectacles alongside both traditional and modern practices and within both local and national contexts, Wood reconfigures our understanding of lynching's relationship to modern life.

100 Years of Lynchings

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Author: Ralph Ginzburg

Publisher: Black Classic Press

ISBN: 9780933121188

Category: Social Science

Page: 270

View: 8783

Ginzburg compiles vivid newspaper accounts from 1886 to 1960 to provide insight and understanding of the history of racial violence.

African-American Poetry

An Anthology, 1773-1927

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Author: Joan R. Sherman

Publisher: Courier Corporation

ISBN: 0486296040

Category: Poetry

Page: 82

View: 7196

Rich selection of 74 poems ranging from the religious and moral verse of Phillis Wheatley Peters (ca. 1753 1784) to 20th-century work of Langston Hughes and Countee Cullen. Other contributors include James Weldon Johnson, Paul Laurence Dunbar, many others. Indispensable for students of the black experience in America and any lover of fine poetry. Includes 4 selections from the Common Core State Standards Initiative: "I, Too, Sing America," "Lift Every Voice and Sing," "Yet Do I Marvel," and "On Being Brought from Africa to America." Dover Original."

The Red Record

Top Crime Collections

DOWNLOAD NOW »

Author: Ida B. Wells-Barnett

Publisher: 谷月社

ISBN: N.A

Category: Fiction

Page: N.A

View: 5241

The student of American sociology will find the year 1894 marked by a pronounced awakening of the public conscience to a system of anarchy and outlawry which had grown during a series of ten years to be so common, that scenes of unusual brutality failed to have any visible effect upon the humane sentiments of the people of our land. Beginning with the emancipation of the Negro, the inevitable result of unbribled power exercised for two and a half centuries, by the white man over the Negro, began to show itself in acts of conscienceless outlawry. During the slave regime, the Southern white man owned the Negro body and soul. It was to his interest to dwarf the soul and preserve the body. Vested with unlimited power over his slave, to subject him to any and all kinds of physical punishment, the white man was still restrained from such punishment as tended to injure the slave by abating his physical powers and thereby reducing his financial worth. While slaves were scourged mercilessly, and in countless cases inhumanly treated in other respects, still the white owner rarely permitted his anger to go so far as to take a life, which would entail upon him a loss of several hundred dollars. The slave was rarely killed, he was too valuable; it was easier and quite as effective, for discipline or revenge, to sell him "Down South." But Emancipation came and the vested interests of the white man in the Negro's body were lost. The white man had no right to scourge the emancipated Negro, still less has he a right to kill him. But the Southern white people had been educated so long in that school of practice, in which might makes right, that they disdained to draw strict lines of action in dealing with the Negro. In slave times the Negro was kept subservient and submissive by the frequency and severity of the scourging, but, with freedom, a new system of intimidation came into vogue; the Negro was not only whipped and scourged; he was killed....