Jewish Girls Coming of Age in America, 1860-1920

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Author: Melissa R. Klapper

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 9780814749340

Category: Religion

Page: 310

View: 3731

Jewish Girls Coming of Age in America, 1860—1920 draws on a wealth of archival material, much of which has never been published—or even read—to illuminate the ways in which Jewish girls’ adolescent experiences reflected larger issues relating to gender, ethnicity, religion, and education. Klapper explores the dual roles girls played as agents of acculturation and guardians of tradition. Their search for an identity as American girls that would not require the abandonment of Jewish tradition and culture mirrored the struggle of their families and communities for integration into American society. While focusing on their lives as girls, not the adults they would later become, Klapper draws on the papers of such figures as Henrietta Szold, founder of Hadassah; Edna Ferber, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of Showboat; and Marie Syrkin, literary critic and Zionist. Klapper also analyzes the diaries, memoirs, and letters of hundreds of other girls whose later lives and experiences have been lost to history. Told in an engaging style and filled with colorful quotes, the book brings to life a neglected group of fascinating historical figures during a pivotal moment in the development of gender roles, adolescence, and the modern American Jewish community.

Girlhood

A Global History

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Author: Jennifer Helgren,Colleen Vasconcellos

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 0813549469

Category: History

Page: 440

View: 2599

Girlhood, interdisciplinary and global in source, scope, and methodology, examines the centrality of girlhood in shaping women's lives. Scholars study how age and gender, along with a multitude of other identities, work together to influence the historical experience. Spanning a broad time frame from 1750 to the present, essays illuminate the various continuities and differences in girls' lives across culture and region--girls on all continents except Antarctica are represented. Case studies and essays are arranged thematically to encourage comparisons between girls' experiences in diverse locales, and to assess how girls were affected by historical developments such as colonialism, political repression, war, modernization, shifts in labor markets, migrations, and the rise of consumer culture.

The Women who Reconstructed American Jewish Education, 1910-l965

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Author: Carol K. Ingall

Publisher: UPNE

ISBN: 1584658568

Category: Religion

Page: 243

View: 6737

The conventional history of Jewish education in the United States focuses on the contributions of Samson Benderly and his male disciples. This volume tells a different story—the story of the women who either influenced or were influenced by Benderly or his closest friend, Mordecai Kaplan. Through ten portraits, the contributors illuminate the impact of these unheralded women who introduced American Jews to Hebraism and Zionism and laid the foundation for contemporary Jewish experiential education. Taken together, these ten portraits illuminate the important and hitherto unexamined contribution of women to the development of American Jewish education.

Ballots, Babies, and Banners of Peace

American Jewish Women’s Activism, 1890-1940

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Author: Melissa R. Klapper

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 0814748953

Category: History

Page: 301

View: 8099

Winner of the 2013 National Jewish Book Award, Women's Studies Ballots, Babies, and Banners of Peace explores the social and political activism of American Jewish women from approximately 1890 to the beginnings of World War II. Written in an engaging style, the book demonstrates that no history of the birth control, suffrage, or peace movements in the United States is complete without analyzing the impact of Jewish women's presence. The volume is based on years of extensive primary source research in more than a dozen archives and among hundreds of primary sources, many of which have previously never been seen. Voluminous personal papers and institutional records paint a vivid picture of a world in which both middle-class and working-class American Jewish women were consistently and publicly engaged in all the major issues of their day and worked closely with their non-Jewish counterparts on behalf of activist causes. This extraordinarily well researched volume makes a unique contribution to the study of modern women's history, modern Jewish history, and the history of American social movements. Instructor's Guide

That Pride of Race and Character

The Roots of Jewish Benevolence in the Jim Crow South

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Author: Caroline E. Light

Publisher: NYU Press

ISBN: 1479835773

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 5260

“It has ever been the boast of the Jewish people, that they support their own poor,” declared Kentucky attorney Benjamin Franklin Jonas in 1856. “Their reasons are partly founded in religious necessity, and partly in that pride of race and character which has supported them through so many ages of trial and vicissitude.” In That Pride of Race and Character, Caroline E. Light examines the American Jewish tradition of benevolence and charity and explores its southern roots. Light provides a critical analysis of benevolence as it was inflected by regional ideals of race and gender, showing how a southern Jewish benevolent empire emerged in response to the combined pressures of post-Civil War devastation and the simultaneous influx of eastern European immigration. In an effort to combat the voices of anti-Semitism and nativism, established Jewish leaders developed a sophisticated and cutting-edge network of charities in the South to ensure that Jews took care of those considered “their own” while also proving themselves to be exemplary white citizens. Drawing from confidential case files and institutional records from various southern Jewish charities, the book relates how southern Jewish leaders and their immigrant clients negotiated the complexities of “fitting in” in a place and time of significant socio-political turbulence. Ultimately, the southern Jewish call to benevolence bore the particular imprint of the region’s racial mores and left behind a rich legacy.

The Girls' History and Culture Reader

The Twentieth Century

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Author: Miriam Forman-Brunell,Leslie Paris

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 0252077687

Category: History

Page: 334

View: 4575

A pioneering, field-defining collection of essential texts exploring girlhood in the twentieth century

Small Strangers

The Experiences of Immigrant Children in America, 1880-1925

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Author: Melissa R. Klapper

Publisher: Ivan R Dee

ISBN: 9781566637336

Category: Social Science

Page: 219

View: 5468

Citing a large percentage of immigrants who were children who arrived in America between the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, an analysis of their experiences and contributions to U.S. society also offers insight into their struggles to bridge disparate cultures. History.

A Wider World

Portraits in Adolescence

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Author: Kate Simon

Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers

ISBN: N.A

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 186

View: 6374

Inventing Jewish Ritual

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Author: Vanessa L. Ochs

Publisher: Jewish Publication Society

ISBN: 9780827608344

Category: Social Science

Page: 300

View: 3575

Vanessa Ochs invites her readers to explore how Jewish practice can be more meaningful through renewing, reshaping, and even creating new rituals, such as naming ceremonies for welcoming baby girls, healing services, Miriam’s cup, mitzvah days, egalitarian wedding practices, and commitment ceremonies. We think of rituals—the patterned ways of doing things that have shared and often multiple meanings— as being steeped in tradition and therefore unalterable. But rituals have always been reinvented. When we perform ancient rituals in a particular place and time they are no longer quite the same rituals they once were. Each is a debut, an innovation: this Sabbath meal, this Passover seder, this wedding—firsts in their own unique ways. In the last 30 years there has been a surge of interest in reinventing ritual, in what is called minhag America. Ochs describes the range and diversity of interest in this Jewish American experience and examines how it reflects tradition as it revives Jewish culture and faith. And she shows us how to create our own ritual objects, sacred spaces, ceremonies, and liturgies that can be paths to greater personal connection with history and with holiness: baby-naming ceremonies for girls, divorce rituals, Shabbat practices, homemade haggadahs, ritual baths, healing services. Through these and more, we see that American Judaism is a dynamic cultural process very much open to change and a source of great personal and communal meaning. The ceramic “Tree of Life” spice container that appears on the cover of Inventing Jewish Ritual is by Susan Garson of Garson and Pakele Studios, www.garsonpakele.com

Women and American Judaism

Historical Perspectives

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Author: Pamela Susan Nadell,Jonathan D. Sarna

Publisher: UPNE

ISBN: 9781584651246

Category: History

Page: 322

View: 8685

New portrayals of the religious lives of American Jewish women from colonial times to the present.

Material culture and Jewish thought in America

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Author: Ken Koltun-Fromm

Publisher: Indiana University Press

ISBN: 9780253354549

Category: Religion

Page: 342

View: 1704

How Jews think about and work with objects is the subject of this fascinating study of the interplay between material culture and Jewish thought. Ken Koltun-Fromm draws from philosophy, cultural studies, literature, psychology, film, and photography to portray the vibrancy and richness of Jewish practice in America. His analyses of Mordecai Kaplan's obsession with journal writing, Joseph Soloveitchik's urban religion, Abraham Joshua Heschel's fascination with objects in The Sabbath, and material identity in the works of Anzia Yezierska, Cynthia Ozick, Bernard Malamud, and Philip Roth, as well as Jewish images on the covers of Lilith magazine and in the Jazz Singer films, offer a groundbreaking approach to an understanding of modern Jewish thought and its relation to American culture.

Gentile Tales

The Narrative Assault on Late Medieval Jews

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Author: Miri Rubin

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 9780812218800

Category: History

Page: 280

View: 2653

During the late medieval period, accusations that Jews had abused Christ by desecrating the Eucharist created a powerful anti-Jewish movement and violent clashes quickly spread throughout Europe.

Gentile New York

The Images of Non-Jews Among Jewish Immigrants

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Author: Gil Ribak

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 292

View: 1743

The very question of “what do Jews think about the goyim” has fascinated Jews and Gentiles, anti-Semites and philo-Semites alike. MThis critical look at the origins of Jewish liberalism in America provides a more complicated and nuanced picture of the Americanization process. Gentile New York examines these newcomers' evolving feelings toward non-Jews through four critical decades in the American Jewish experience. Gil Ribak considers how they perceived Gentiles in general as well as such different groups as “Yankees” (a common term in many Yiddish sources), Germans, Irish, Italians, Poles, and African Americans.

Frontiers

A Journal of Women Studies

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Author: N.A

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Women

Page: N.A

View: 4984