Polis and Personification in Classical Athenian Art

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Author: Amy C. Smith

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004194177

Category: Art

Page: 202

View: 7963

Ancient Greek artists pioneered in the allegorical use of personifications of political ideas, events, places, institutions, and peoples in visual arts. This book surveys and interprets these personifications within the intellectual and political climate of the golden age of Athens.

Polis and Personification in Classical Athenian Art

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Author: Amy C. Smith

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004214526

Category: History

Page: 280

View: 3550

Ancient Greek artists pioneered in the allegorical use of personifications of political ideas, events, places, institutions, and peoples in visual arts. This book surveys and interprets these personifications within the intellectual and political climate of the golden age of Athens.

Greek Art and Aesthetics in the Fourth Century B.C.

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Author: William A. P. Childs

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 1400890519

Category: Art

Page: 592

View: 5326

Greek Art and Aesthetics in the Fourth Century B.C. analyzes the broad character of art produced during this period, providing in-depth analysis of and commentary on many of its most notable examples of sculpture and painting. Taking into consideration developments in style and subject matter, and elucidating political, religious, and intellectual context, William A. P. Childs argues that Greek art in this era was a natural outgrowth of the high classical period and focused on developing the rudiments of individual expression that became the hallmark of the classical in the fifth century. As Childs shows, in many respects the art of this period corresponds with the philosophical inquiry by Plato and his contemporaries into the nature of art and speaks to the contemporaneous sense of insecurity and renewed religious devotion. Delving into formal and iconographic developments in sculpture and painting, Childs examines how the sensitive, expressive quality of these works seamlessly links the classical and Hellenistic periods, with no appreciable rupture in the continuous exploration of the human condition. Another overarching theme concerns the nature of “style as a concept of expression,” an issue that becomes more important given the increasingly multiple styles and functions of fourth-century Greek art. Childs also shows how the color and form of works suggested the unseen and revealed the profound character of individuals and the physical world.

Bronze Age Eleusis and the Origins of the Eleusinian Mysteries

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Author: Michael B. Cosmopoulos

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107010993

Category: History

Page: 241

View: 3131

This book provides a synthesis of the archaeology of Eleusis during the Bronze Age, reconstructing the origins and early development of the Eleusinian Mysteries.

Medicine and Society in Ptolemaic Egypt

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Author: Philippa Lang

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9004235515

Category: Medical

Page: 332

View: 7426

Examining all forms of healing within the specific socioeconomic and environmental constraints of the Ptolemies’ Egypt, this book explores how linguistic, cultural and ethnic affiliations and interactions were expressed in the medical domain.

The Nature of Classical Collecting

Collectors and Collections, 100 BCE – 100 CE

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Author: Alexandra Bounia

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1351885251

Category: History

Page: 370

View: 3725

The phenomenon of collecting as a systematic activity undertaken for symbolic rather than actual needs, is traditionally taken to originate in the middle of the fifteenth century, when the first cabinets of curiosities appear in Italy. Yet it is clear that the practice of collecting started long before that, indeed its origins can be traced back thousands of years to European prehistoric communities. Whilst this early genesis is, due to lack of written records, still shrouded in much mystery, The Nature of Classical Collecting argues that the collecting practices of classical Greece and Rome offer a rich tapestry of experiences which can be reconstructed to illuminate a pivotal period in the long and ever developing phenomenon of collecting. Utilizing a wide variety of examples of classical collections - including grave goods, the accumulations of Greek temples and open-air shrines, the royal collections of Hellenistic kings, Roman art and curiosity collections, and relics - The Nature of Classical Collecting focuses on the field of the 'pre-history' of collecting, a neglected yet critical phase that helped crystallize the western concept of collecting. Drawing primarily on Latin writings from the period 100 BCE to 100 CE it shows how collecting underwent a transition from a religious and political activity, to an intellectual practice in which connoisseurship could impart social status. It also demonstrates how the appreciation of objects and artists changed as new qualities were attributed to material culture, resulting in the establishment of art markets, patronage and an interest in the history of art. By exploring these early developments, The Nature of Classical Collecting not only provides a fascinating insight into the culture of late Hellenistic/early Imperial Roman collecting, but also offers a much fuller grounding for understanding the influences and inspirations of those Renaissance collectors who themselves were to have such a profound influence on the course of European art, architecture and culture.

God of War

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Author: Matthew Stover,Robert E. Vardeman

Publisher: Del Rey

ISBN: 9780345516961

Category: Fiction

Page: 304

View: 7819

Offering deeper insights into the critically acclaimed God of War® franchise, this novel returns us to the dark world of ancient Greek mythology explored in the heart-pounding action of God of War I, the bestselling video game. A brutal warrior, Kratos is a slave to the gods of Olympus. Plagued by the nightmares of his past and yearning for freedom, the Ghost of Sparta would do anything to be free of his debt to the gods. He is on the verge of losing all hope when the gods give him one last task to end his servitude. He must destroy Ares, the god of war. But what chance does a mere mortal have against a god? Armed with the deadly chained Blades of Chaos, guided by the goddess Athena, and driven by his own insatiable thirst for vengeance, Kratos seeks the only relic powerful enough to slay Ares . . . a quest that will take him deep into the mysterious temple borne by the Titan Cronos! From the black depths of Hades to the war-torn city of Athens to the lost desert beyond, God of War sheds a brutal new light on the bestselling video game and on the legend of Kratos. From the Trade Paperback edition.

Aphrodite's Tortoise

The Veiled Woman of Ancient Greece

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Author: Lloyd Llewellyn-Jones

Publisher: Classical Pressof Wales

ISBN: 9781905125425

Category: Design

Page: 358

View: 8402

Greek women routinely wore the veil. That is the unexpected finding of this major study. The Greeks, rightly credited with the invention of civic openness, are revealed as also part of a more eastern tradition of seclusion. Llewellyn-Jones' work proceeds from literary and, notably, from iconographic evidence. In sculpture and vase painting it demonstrates the presence of the veil, often covering the head, but also more unobtrusively folded back onto the shoulders. This discreet fashion not only gave a priviledged view of the face to the ancient art consumer, but also, incidentally, allowed the veil to escape the notice of traditional modern scholarship. From Greek literary sources, the author shows that full veiling of the head and face was commonplace. He analyses the elaborate Greek vocabulary for veiling and explores what the veil meant to achieve. He shows that the veil was a conscious extension of the house and was often referred to as "tegidion", literally "a little roof". Veiling was thus an ingeneous compromise; it allowed women to circulate in public while maintaining the ideal of a house-bound existence. Alert to the different types of veil used, the author uses Greek and more modern evidence (mostly from the Arab world) to show how women could exploit and subvert the veil as a means of eloquent, sometimes emotional, communication. First published in 2003, Llewellyn-Jones' book has established itself as a central - and inspiring - text for the study of ancient women.

Ancient Libraries

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Author: Jason König,Katerina Oikonomopoulou,Greg Woolf

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107244587

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 4191

The circulation of books was the motor of classical civilization. But books were both expensive and rare, and so libraries - private and public, royal and civic - played key roles in articulating intellectual life. This collection, written by an international team of scholars, presents a fundamental reassessment of how ancient libraries came into being, how they were organized and how they were used. Drawing on papyrology and archaeology, and on accounts written by those who read and wrote in them, it presents new research on reading cultures, on book collecting and on the origins of monumental library buildings. Many of the traditional stories told about ancient libraries are challenged. Few were really enormous, none were designed as research centres, and occasional conflagrations do not explain the loss of most ancient texts. But the central place of libraries in Greco-Roman culture emerges more clearly than ever.

Artists and Signatures in Ancient Greece

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Author: Jeffrey M. Hurwit

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107105714

Category: Art

Page: 237

View: 703

This book offers insight into Greek conceptions of art, the artist, and artistic originality by examining artists' signatures in ancient Greece.

Artists and Artistic Production in Ancient Greece

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Author: Kristen Seaman,Peter Schultz

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107074460

Category: Art

Page: 278

View: 8856

Greek artists and architects were important social agents who played significant roles in the social, cultural, and economic life of the ancient Greek world. In Artists and Artistic Production in Ancient Greece, art historians, archaeologists, and historians explore the roles and impacts of artists and craftsmen in ancient Greek society. The contributing authors draw upon artistic, architectural, literary, epigraphical, and historical evidence to discuss a range of artists, architects, artistic media, and regions. They refer to historiography and modern theory, taking stock of the past while offering some new directions for future research. Incorporating a variety of methodological approaches and making use of often-neglected evidence, Artists and Artistic Production in Ancient Greece re-examines many long-held ideas and provides a deeper understanding of particular artists and architects, their works, and their social agency.

Visual Style and Constructing Identity in the Hellenistic World

Nemrud DaÄŸ and Commagene under Antiochos I

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Author: Miguel John Versluys

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107141974

Category: Art

Page: 272

View: 2976

Located in the small kingdom of Commagene at the upper Euphrates, the late Hellenistic monument of Nemrud Dağ (c.50 BC) has been undeservedly neglected by scholars. Qualified as a Greco-Persian hybrid instigated by a lunatic king, this fascinating project of bricolage has been written out of history. This volume redresses that imbalance, interpreting Nemrud Dağ as an attempt at canon building by Antiochos I in order to construct a dynastic ideology and social order, and proving the monument's importance for our understanding of a crucial transitional phase from Hellenistic to Roman. Hellenistic Commagene therefore holds a profound significance for a number of discussions, such as the functioning of the Hellenistic koine and the genesis of Roman 'art', Hellenism and Persianism in antiquity, dynastic propaganda and the power of images, Romanisation in the East, the contextualising of the Augustan cultural revolution, and the role of Greek culture in the Roman world.

Greek Votive Offerings

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Author: William Henry Denham Rouse

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107456428

Category: Social Science

Page: 484

View: 8622

Originally published in 1902, this book provides an extensive survey of the tradition of votive offerings in ancient Greece. Rouse details the various motives behind offerings, including propitiation, tithes, and domestic purposes, drawing on the evidence of inscriptions and ancient eyewitnesses, and also examines ancient votive formulae. Thirteen indices containing an exhaustive list of epigraphical references to votive offerings at various shrines are also included. This well-written and richly-illustrated book will be of value to anyone with an interest in ancient Greek religion and the history of votive offerings.

The Classical Tradition

Art, Literature, Thought

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Author: Michael Silk,Ingo Gildenhard,Rosemary Barrow

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1405155507

Category: History

Page: 536

View: 2453

The Classical Tradition: Art, Literature, Thought presents an authoritative, coherent and wide-ranging guide to the afterlife of Greco-Roman antiquity in later Western cultures and a ground-breaking reinterpretation of large aspects of Western culture as a whole from a classical perspective. Features a unique combination of chronological range, cultural scope, coherent argument, and unified analysis Written in a lively, engaging, and elegant manner Presents an innovative overview of the afterlife of antiquity Crosses disciplinary boundaries to make new sense of a rich variety of material, rarely brought together Fully illustrated with a mix of color and black & white images

Universal Empire

A Comparative Approach to Imperial Culture and Representation in Eurasian History

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Author: Peter Fibiger Bang,Dariusz Kolodziejczyk

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139560956

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 2683

The claim by certain rulers to universal empire has a long history stretching as far back as the Assyrian and Achaemenid Empires. This book traces its various manifestations in classical antiquity, the Islamic world, Asia and Central America as well as considering seventeenth- and eighteenth-century European discussions of international order. As such it is an exercise in comparative world history combining a multiplicity of approaches, from ancient history, to literary and philosophical studies, to the history of art and international relations and historical sociology. The notion of universal, imperial rule is presented as an elusive and much coveted prize among monarchs in history, around which developed forms of kingship and political culture. Different facets of the phenomenon are explored under three, broadly conceived, headings: symbolism, ceremony and diplomatic relations; universal or cosmopolitan literary high-cultures; and, finally, the inclination to present universal imperial rule as an expression of cosmic order.

Museum Archetypes and Collecting in the Ancient World

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Author: Maia Wellington Gahtan,Donatella Pegazzano

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 900428348X

Category: History

Page: 236

View: 2281

Museum Archetypes and Collecting in the Ancient World offers the first general overview of the reasons why ancient civilizations from Archaic Greece to the Early Christian period amassed objects and displayed them together in public, private and imaginary contexts.

The Emergence of the Classical Style in Greek Sculpture

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Author: Richard Neer

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226570657

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 2325

In this wide-ranging study, Richard Neer offers a new way to understand the epoch-making sculpture of classical Greece. Working at the intersection of art history, archaeology, literature, and aesthetics, he reveals a people fascinated with the power of sculpture to provoke wonder in beholders. Wonder, not accuracy, realism, naturalism or truth, was the supreme objective of Greek sculptors. Neer traces this way of thinking about art from the poems of Homer to the philosophy of Plato. Then, through meticulous accounts of major sculpture from around the Greek world, he shows how the demand for wonder-inducing statues gave rise to some of the greatest masterpieces of Greek art. Rewriting the history of Greek sculpture in Greek terms and restoring wonder to a sometimes dusty subject, The Emergence of the Classical Style in Greek Sculpture is an indispensable guide for anyone interested in the art of sculpture or the history of the ancient world.

The Ancient World in Silent Cinema

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Author: Pantelis Michelakis,Maria Wyke

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 110701610X

Category: History

Page: 379

View: 2365

The first systematic attempt to focus on the instrumental role of silent cinema in early twentieth-century conceptualizations of the ancient Mediterranean and Middle East. It is located at the intersection of film studies, classics, Bible studies and cultural studies.

Brill's Companion to Aphrodite

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Author: Amy C. Smith,Sadie Pickup

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9047444507

Category: History

Page: 472

View: 2277

In this book an international team of scholars from a wide range of academic fields and perspectives reevaluate the Greek goddess Aphrodite, her worship throughout the Mediterranean, manifold roles in Graeco-Roman antiquity, and reception through the Renaissance and beyond.