Law and Judicial Duty

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Author: Philip HAMBURGER

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674038193

Category: Law

Page: 704

View: 8451

Philip Hamburger’s Law and Judicial Duty traces the early history of what is today called "judicial review." The book sheds new light on a host of misunderstood problems, including intent, the status of foreign and international law, the cases and controversies requirement, and the authority of judicial precedent. The book is essential reading for anyone concerned about the proper role of the judiciary.

The Supreme Court's Retreat from Reconstruction

A Distortion of Constitutional Jurisprudence

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Author: Frank J. Scaturro

Publisher: Greenwood Publishing Group

ISBN: 9780313311055

Category: Law

Page: 305

View: 4530

Compares the Supreme Court's holdings regarding the Thirteenth, Fourteenth, and Fifteenth Amendments to the framers' own interpretations and examines the resulting distortions of constitutional law, some of which continue to this day.

A History of the Supreme Court

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Author: Bernard Schwartz

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 9780195093872

Category: History

Page: 465

View: 6289

A comprehensive history of the United States Supreme Court from its ill-esteemed beginning in 1790 to one of the most important and controversial branches of the Federal government.

The Jurisprudence of Style

A Structuralist History of American Pragmatism and Liberal Legal Thought

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Author: Justin Desautels-Stein

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1107156653

Category: History

Page: 332

View: 8842

Offers a structuralist critique of the relationship between pragmatism and liberalism in American legal thought.

The Oxford Handbook of Law and Politics

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Author: Keith E. Whittington,R. Daniel Kelemen,Gregory A. Caldeira

Publisher: OUP Oxford

ISBN: 0191615064

Category: Political Science

Page: 832

View: 3163

The study of law and politics is one of the foundation stones of the discipline of political science, and it has been one of the most productive areas of cross-fertilization between the various subfields of political science and between political science and other cognate disciplines. This Handbook provides a comprehensive survey of the field of law and politics in all its diversity, ranging from such traditional subjects as theories of jurisprudence, constitutionalism, judicial politics and law-and-society to such re-emerging subjects as comparative judicial politics, international law, and democratization. The Oxford Handbook of Law and Politics gathers together leading scholars in the field to assess key literatures shaping the discipline today and to help set the direction of research in the decade ahead.

Jurisprudence and Theology

In Late Ancient and Medieval Jewish Thought

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Author: Joseph E. David

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 331906584X

Category: Law

Page: 182

View: 5985

The book provides in depth studies of two epistemological aspects of Jewish Law (Halakhah) as the ‘Word of God’ – the question of legal reasoning and the problem of knowing and remembering. - How different are the epistemological concerns of religious-law in comparison to other legal systems? - In what ways are jurisprudential attitudes prescribed and dependent on theological presumptions? - What specifies legal reasoning and legal knowledge in a religious framework? The author outlines the rabbinic jurisprudential thought rooted in Talmudic literature which underwent systemization and enhancement by the Babylonian Geonim and the Andalusian Rabbis up until the twelfth century. The book develops a synoptic view on the growth of rabbinic legal thought against the background of Christian theological motifs on the one hand and Karaite and Islamic systemized jurisprudence on the other hand. It advances a perspective of legal-theology that combines analysis of jurisprudential reflections and theological views within a broad historical and intellectual framework. The book advocates two approaches to the study of the legal history of the Halakhah: comparative jurisprudence and legal-theology, based on the understanding that jurisprudence and theology are indispensable and inseparable pillars of legal praxis.

Rule of Law

The Jurisprudence of Liberty in the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries

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Author: John Phillip Reid

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780875803272

Category: Law

Page: 150

View: 4834

"While the rule of law's English roots can be found in the Middle Ages, its governing doctrine rose to power during the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. John Phillip Reid traces the concept's progress through a series of landmark events in Great Britain and North America: the trial of Charles I, the creation of the Mayflower Compact, the demand for a codification of the laws in John Winthrop's Massachusetts Bay Colony, and an attempt to harness the Puritan Lord Protector Oliver Cromwell to the rule of law by crowning him king. The American Revolution, the culmination of two centuries of political foment, marked the greater victory of rule of law." "Even as Reid tells this story, he argues that we must not take for granted what the expression "rule of law" meant. Rather, if we are to understand its nuances, we must closely examine the historical context as well as the intentions of those who invoked it as a doctrine."--BOOK JACKET.

Government by Judiciary

The Transformation of the Fourteenth Amendment

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Author: Raoul Berger

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780865971448

Category: Law

Page: 555

View: 5202

The Justices, who are virtually unaccountable, irremovable, and irreversible, have taken over from the people control of their own destiny. — Raoul Berger It is the thesis of this monumentally argued book that the United States Supreme Court—largely through abuses of the Fourteenth Amendment to the Constitution—has embarked on "a continuing revision of the Constitution, under the guise of interpretation." Consequently, the Court has subverted America's democratic institutions and wreaked havoc upon Americans' social and political lives. One of the first constitutional scholars to question the rise of judicial activism in modern times, Raoul Berger points out that "the Supreme Court is not empowered to rewrite the Constitution, that in its transformation of the Fourteenth Amendment it has demonstrably done so. Thereby the Justices, who are virtually unaccountable, irremovable, and irreversible, have taken over from the people control of their own destiny, an awesome exercise of power." The Court has accomplished this transformation by ignoring or actually distorting the original intent of both the framers and the supporters of the Fourteenth Amendment. In school desegregation and legislative reapportionment cases, for example, the Court manipulated the history, meaning, and purpose of the amendment's Equal Protection Clause in order to achieve a desired political result. In cases involving First Amendment freedoms and the rights of the accused, the judges converted the Fourteenth Amendment's Due Process Clause into a vehicle for the nationalization of the Bill of Rights. Yet these actions were nothing less than "usurpations" that robbed "from the States a power that unmistakably was left to them." This new second edition includes the original text of 1977 and extensive supplementary discourses in which the author assesses and rebuts the responses of his critics. Raoul Berger retired in 1976 as Charles Warren Senior Fellow in American Legal History, Harvard University.

Justice and Injustice in Law and Legal Theory

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Author: Austin Sarat,Thomas R. Kearns

Publisher: University of Michigan Press

ISBN: 9780472023684

Category: Law

Page: 184

View: 7355

Running through the history of jurisprudence and legal theory is a recurring concern about the connections between law and justice and about the ways law is implicated in injustice. In earlier times law and justice were viewed as virtually synonymous. Experience, however, has taught us that, in fact, injustice may be supported by law. Nonetheless, the belief remains that justice is the special concern of law. Commentators from Plato to Derrida have called law to account in the name of justice, asked that law provide a language of justice, and demanded that it promote the attainment of justice. The justice that is usually spoken about in these commentaries is elusive, if not illusory, and disconnected from the embodied practice of law. Furthermore, the very meaning of justice, especially as it relates to law, is in dispute. Justice may refer to distributional issues or it may involve primarily procedural questions, impartiality in judgment or punishment and recompense. The essays collected in Justice and Injustice in Law and Legal Theory seek to remedy this uncertainty about the meaning of justice and its disembodied quality, by embedding inquiry about justice in an examination of law's daily practices, its institutional arrangements, and its engagement with particular issues at particular moments in time. The essays examine the relationship between law and justice and injustice in specific issues and practices and, in doing so, make the question of justice come alive as a concrete political question. They draw on the disciplines of history, law, anthropology, and political science. Contributors to this volume include Nancy Coot, Joshua Coven, Robert Gorton, Frank Michelin, and Michael Tossing. Austin Sarat is William Nelson Cromwell Professor of Jurisprudence and Political Science, Amherst College. Thomas R. Kearns is William H. Hastie Professor of Philosophy, Amherst College.

Brandeis and the Progressive Constitution

Erie, the Judicial Power, and the Politics of the Federal Courts in Twentieth-century America

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Author: Edward A. Purcell

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300078046

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 417

View: 6488

During the twentieth century, and particularly between the 1930s and 1950s, ideas about the nature of constitutional government, the legitimacy of judicial lawmaking, and the proper role of the federal courts evolved and shifted. This book focuses on Supreme Court justice Louis D. Brandeis and his opinion in the 1938 landmark case Erie Railroad Co. v. Tompkins, which resulted in a significant relocation of power from federal to state courts. Distinguished legal historian Edward A. Purcell shows how the Erie case provides a window on the legal, political, and ideological battles over the federal courts in the New Deal era. Purcell also offers an in-depth study of Brandeis's constitutional jurisprudence and evolving legal views. Examining the social origins and intended significance of the Erie decision, Purcell concludes that the case was a product of early twentieth-century progressivism. The author explores Brandeis personal values and political purposes and argues that the justice was an exemplar of neither judicial restraint nor neutral principles, despite his later reputation. In an analysis of the continual reconceptions of both Brandeis and Erie by new generations of judg

Origins of the Dred Scott Case

Jacksonian Jurisprudence and the Supreme Court, 1837-1857

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Author: Austin Allen

Publisher: University of Georgia Press

ISBN: 0820336645

Category: History

Page: 288

View: 345

The Supreme Court's 1857 Dred Scott decision denied citizenship to African Americans and enabled slavery's westward expansion. It has long stood as a grievous instance of justice perverted by sectional politics. Austin Allen finds that the outcome of Dred Scott hinged not on a single issue—slavery—but on a web of assumptions, agendas, and commitments held collectively and individually by Chief Justice Roger B. Taney and his colleagues. Allen carefully tracks arguments made by Taney Court justices in more than 1,600 reported cases in the two decades prior to Dred Scott and in its immediate aftermath. By showing us the political, professional, ideological, and institutional contexts in which the Taney Court worked, Allen reveals that Dred Scott was not simply a victory for the Court's prosouthern faction. It was instead an outgrowth of Jacksonian jurisprudence, an intellectual system that charged the Court with protecting slavery, preserving both federal power and state sovereignty, promoting economic development, and securing the legal foundations of an emerging corporate order—all at the same time. Here is a wealth of new insight into the internal dynamics of the Taney Court and the origins of its most infamous decision.

Supreme Court Jurisprudence in Times of National Crisis, Terrorism, and War

A Historical Perspective

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Author: Arthur H. Garrison

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 0739151045

Category: Law

Page: 500

View: 6477

From the foundation of the American Republic, presidents have had to deal with both internal and external national security threats. From President Washington and his policy of neutrality during the wars between Great Britain and France in the eighteenth century, to President Lincoln and the war to save the union, to President Wilson during the war to end all wars, to President Roosevelt and war of the Greatest Generation, to President Truman and his steel during the forgotten war, and most recently to President Bush and the War on Terror, presidents have had to use their power as commander-in-chief to meet the challenges of national crisis and war. The judiciary, specifically the Supreme Court, has also played an integral part in the historical development and defining of the commander-in-chief power in times of war and national crisis from the earliest days of the republic. How these powers have grown is a consequence of how the presidents have viewed the office of the presidency and how the judiciary has interpreted the commander-in-chief and executive power clauses of the U.S. Constitution over time. Supreme Court Jurisprudence in Times of National Crisis, Terrorism, and War provides a chronological review of the major national security and war events in American history. Garrison reviews the great debates between Hamilton and Madison and Chief Justice Roger Taney and Attorney General Edward Bates on presidential executive power and how subsequent presidents have adopted the Hamiltonian view of the presidency. He also examines how Article III courts, specifically the Supreme Court, have defined, expanded, and established boundaries on the commander-in-chief power. With this historical backdrop, Garrison reveals how, for over two centuries, the judiciary has defended the rule of law and maintained the principle that under the U.S. Constitution neither the guns of war nor threats to safety have silenced the rule of law.

Doing Austin Justice

The Reception of John Austin's Philosophy of Law in Nineteenth Century England

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Author: Wilfrid Rumble,John Austin

Publisher: A&C Black

ISBN: 9780826474742

Category: Philosophy

Page: 270

View: 5959

John Austin was a towering presence in nineteenth-century English jurisprudence. He lived at the centre of the utilitarian movement in London during the the 1820s and 1830s, and became its leading philosopher of law after Bentham's death (1832). Wilfred E. Rumble's book analyses Austin's work in its historical context, and shows how much of it remains viable today--including his conception of analytical jurisprudence, his sharp distinction between law and morality, and his utilitarian theory of resistance to government. The end result is a richer, more nuanced portrait of Austin's legal philosophy than his twentieth century critics have painted. Doing Austin Justice thus fills a large gap in the literature about this important figure.

The Gift of Science

Leibniz and the modern legal tradition

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Author: Roger BERKOWITZ,Roger Stuart Berkowitz

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674020790

Category: Law

Page: 234

View: 3117

Moving from the scientific revolution to the nineteenth-century rise of legal codes, Berkowitz tells the story of how lawyers and philosophers invented legal science to preserve law's claim to moral authority. The "gift" of science, however, proved bittersweet. Instead of strengthening the bond between law and justice, the subordination of law to science transformed law from an ethical order into a tool for social and economic ends.

On Law, Politics, and Judicialization

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Author: Martin Shapiro,Alec Stone Sweet

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199256470

Category: Law

Page: 417

View: 3157

Across the globe, the domain of the litigator and the judge has radically expanded, making it increasingly difficult for those who study comparative and international politics, public policy and regulation, or the evolution of new modes of governance to avoid encountering a great deal of law and courts. In On Law, Politics, and Judicialization, two of the world's leading political scientists present the best of their research, focusing on how to build and test a social science oflaw and courts. The opening chapter features Shapiro's classic 'Political Jurisprudence,' and Stone Sweet's 'Judicialization and the Construction of Governance,' pieces that critically redefined research agendas on the politics of law and judging. Subsequent chapters take up diverse themes: thestrategic contexts of litigation and judging; the discursive foundations of judicial power; the social logic of precedent and appeal; the networking of legal elites; the lawmaking dynamics of rights adjudication; the success and diffusion of constitutional review; the reciprocal impact of courts and legislatures; the globalization of private law; methods, hypothesis-testing, and prediction in comparative law; and the sources and consequences of the creeping 'judicialization of politics' aroundthe world. Chosen empirical settings include the United States, the GATT-WTO, France and Germany, Imperial China and Islam, the European Union, and the transnational world of the Lex Mercatoria. Written for a broad, scholarly audience, the book is also recommended for use in graduate and advancedundergraduate courses in law and the social sciences.

American judicial politics

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Author: Harry P. Stumpf

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9780130334657

Category: Law

Page: 489

View: 733

KEY BENEFIT: This book on the American judicial system encourages readers to seriously consider the way we think about law, politics, and society. Providing the most extensive study of jurisprudence available, it offers important perspectives for understanding how and why law works the way it does in the American political context; succinctly presents the main currents of contemporary legal thought for an in-depth study of American law and courts; endeavors to cover each and every significant subject, issue, and research area common to the subfield of law and courts in contemporary American political science; and contains exceptionally through documentation throughout. It describes and analyzes key elements of the judicial process, including the selection of judges at both the state and federal levels; the history and structure of the American judicial system; the trial process in both civil and criminal courts, the implementation of judicial decisions; and the role of the judiciary in American politics and society. It also adds material on feminist jurisprudence, racial theory, and the "new constitutive" view of law, and includes the latest findings and figures on caseflow in the U.S. Supreme Court, law school enrollments, crime statistics, and more. For political scientists, lawyers, and those interested in the American government and constitutional law.

Understanding Jurisprudence

An Introduction to Legal Theory

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Author: Raymond Wacks

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0198806019

Category: Jurisprudence

Page: 407

View: 5780

Written with students in mind, Professor Raymond Wacks brings legal theory to life through his lucid and entertaining style. The author has crafted a manageable guide, balancing concise introductions to the key theorists and core issues such as punishment and rights without ignoring thesubtleties of the subject. Seminal quotes from leading scholars are included to help students recognise the impact of their work, while extensive further reading suggestions at the end of each chapter invite students to explore the broad range of literature available on central topics. Each chapter concludes with a series ofcritical questions designed to encourage reader to think analytically about the law and the key debates which surround it. This book is accompanied by online resources which includes multiple-choice questions with instant feedback to give students the chance to test their understanding.

The Great Chief Justice

John Marshall and the Rule of Law

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Author: Charles F. Hobson

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: N.A

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 256

View: 4162

"John Marshall remains one of the towering figures in the landscape of American law. From the Revolution to the age of Jackson, he played a critical role in defining the "province of the judiciary" and the constitutional limits of legislative action. In this masterly study, Charles Hobson clarifies the coherence and thrust of Marshall's jurisprudence while keeping in sight the man as well as the jurist." "Hobson argues that contrary to his critics, Marshall was no ideologue intent upon appropriating the lawmaking powers of Congress. Rather, he was deeply committed to a principled jurisprudence that was based on a steadfast devotion to a "science of law" richly steeped in the common law tradition. As Hobson shows, such jurisprudence governed every aspect of Marshall's legal philosophy and court opinions, including his understanding of judicial review." "The chief justice, Hobson contends, did not invent judicial review (as many have claimed) but consolidated its practice by adapting common law methods to the needs of a new nation. In practice, his use of judicial review was restrained, employed almost exclusively against acts of the state legislatures. Ultimately, he wielded judicial review to prevent the states from undermining the power of a national government still struggling to establish sovereignty at home and respect abroad."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Rethinking the Judicial Settlement of Reconstruction

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Author: Pamela Brandwein

Publisher: Cambridge University Press

ISBN: 1139496964

Category: Political Science

Page: N.A

View: 1192

American constitutional lawyers and legal historians routinely assert that the Supreme Court's state action doctrine halted Reconstruction in its tracks. But it didn't. Rethinking the Judicial Settlement of Reconstruction demolishes the conventional wisdom - and puts a constructive alternative in its place. Pamela Brandwein unveils a lost jurisprudence of rights that provided expansive possibilities for protecting blacks' physical safety and electoral participation, even as it left public accommodation rights undefended. She shows that the Supreme Court supported a Republican coalition and left open ample room for executive and legislative action. Blacks were abandoned, but by the president and Congress, not the Court. Brandwein unites close legal reading of judicial opinions (some hitherto unknown), sustained historical work, the study of political institutions, and the sociology of knowledge. This book explodes tired old debates and will provoke new ones.