Free Hearts and Free Homes

Gender and American Antislavery Politics

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Author: Michael D. Pierson

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807862665

Category: History

Page: 272

View: 2145

By exploring the intersection of gender and politics in the antebellum North, Michael Pierson examines how antislavery political parties capitalized on the emerging family practices and ideologies that accompanied the market revolution. From the birth of the Liberty party in 1840 through the election of Republican Abraham Lincoln in 1860, antislavery parties celebrated the social practices of modernizing northern families. In an era of social transformations, they attacked their Democratic foes as defenders of an older, less egalitarian patriarchal world. In ways rarely before seen in American politics, Pierson says, antebellum voters could choose between parties that articulated different visions of proper family life and gender roles. By exploring the ways John and Jessie Benton Fremont and Abraham and Mary Todd Lincoln were presented to voters as prospective First Families, and by examining the writings of Harriet Beecher Stowe, Lydia Maria Child, and other antislavery women, Free Hearts and Free Homes rediscovers how crucial gender ideologies were to American politics on the eve of the Civil War.

Antebellum Women

Private, Public, Partisan

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Author: Carol Lasser,Stacey Robertson

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780742551978

Category: History

Page: 217

View: 2544

Antebellum Women: Private, Public, Partisan explores how diverse women understood, and acted upon, their varied constraints and worldviews in American society from the Revolution through the Civil War. Combining a review of the vast scholarship on early nineteenth-century gender and women with an assemblage of intriguing primary documents, this volume outlines three phases in women's engagement in civic and political activities: first as "deferential domestics," then as "companionate co-workers," and finally as "passionate partisans." The book includes a selection of primary documents.

The Great Silent Army of Abolitionism

Ordinary Women in the Antislavery Movement

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Author: Julie Roy Jeffrey

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807847411

Category: History

Page: 311

View: 6657

By focusing on male leaders of the abolitionist movement, historians have often overlooked the great grassroots army of women who also fought to eliminate slavery. Here, Julie Roy Jeffrey explores the involvement of ordinary women_black and white_in the m

Political Antislavery Discourse and American Literature of the 1850s

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Author: David Grant

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 1611493838

Category: History

Page: 225

View: 5078

This study examines how the political anti-slavery challenge to the North informed American literature of the 1850s. As the works of Stowe, Whittier, Willis, and Whitman reveal, the political discourse and literature were branches of the same project: to expose compromise with slavery as a threat to each individual Northerner and to the people as an actor in history.

Freedom's Frontier

California and the Struggle over Unfree Labor, Emancipation, and Reconstruction

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Author: Stacey L. Smith

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469607697

Category: History

Page: 344

View: 3123

Most histories of the Civil War era portray the struggle over slavery as a conflict that exclusively pitted North against South, free labor against slave labor, and black against white. In Freedom's Frontier, Stacey L. Smith examines the battle over slavery as it unfolded on the multiracial Pacific Coast. Despite its antislavery constitution, California was home to a dizzying array of bound and semibound labor systems: African American slavery, American Indian indenture, Latino and Chinese contract labor, and a brutal sex traffic in bound Indian and Chinese women. Using untapped legislative and court records, Smith reconstructs the lives of California's unfree workers and documents the political and legal struggles over their destiny as the nation moved through the Civil War, emancipation, and Reconstruction. Smith reveals that the state's anti-Chinese movement, forged in its struggle over unfree labor, reached eastward to transform federal Reconstruction policy and national race relations for decades to come. Throughout, she illuminates the startling ways in which the contest over slavery's fate included a western struggle that encompassed diverse labor systems and workers not easily classified as free or slave, black or white.

Journal of the Civil War Era

Spring 2014 Issue

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Author: William A. Blair

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469615975

Category: History

Page: 278

View: 2648

The Journal of the Civil War Era Volume 4, Number 1 March 2014 TABLE OF CONTENTS Articles Nicholas Marshall The Great Exaggeration: Death and the Civil War Sarah Bischoff Paulus America's Long Eulogy for Compromise: Henry Clay and American Politics, 1854-58 Ted Maris-Wolf "Of Blood and Treasure": Recaptive Africans and the Politics of Slave Trade Suppression Review Essay W. Caleb McDaniel The Bonds and Boundaries of Antislavery Book Reviews Books Received Professional Notes Craig A. Warren Lincoln's Body: The President in Popular Films of the Sesquicentennial Notes on Contributors

The Oxford Handbook of the American Revolution

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Author: Edward G. Gray,Jane Kamensky

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199324034

Category: History

Page: 696

View: 1812

The Oxford Handbook of the American Revolution draws on a wealth of new scholarship to create a vibrant dialogue among varied approaches to the revolution that made the United States. In thirty-three essays written by authorities on the period, the Handbook brings to life the diverse multitudes of colonial North America and their extraordinary struggles before, during, and after the eight-year-long civil war that secured the independence of thirteen rebel colonies from their erstwhile colonial parent. The chapters explore battles and diplomacy, economics and finance, law and culture, politics and society, gender, race, and religion. Its diverse cast of characters includes ordinary farmers and artisans, free and enslaved African Americans, Indians, and British and American statesmen and military leaders. In addition to expanding the Revolution's who, the Handbook broadens its where, portraying an event that far transcended the boundaries of what was to become the United States. It offers readers an American Revolution whose impact ranged far beyond the thirteen colonies. The Handbook's range of interpretive and methodological approaches captures the full scope of current revolutionary-era scholarship. Its authors, British and American scholars spanning several generations, include social, cultural, military, and imperial historians, as well as those who study politics, diplomacy, literature, gender, and sexuality. Together and separately, these essays demonstrate that the American Revolution remains a vibrant and inviting a subject of inquiry. Nothing comparable has been published in decades.

Suffragists in an Imperial Age

U.S. Expansion and the Woman Question, 1870-1929

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Author: Allison L. Sneider

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0199886512

Category: Social Science

Page: 224

View: 4943

In 1899, Carrie Chapman Catt, who succeeded Susan B. Anthony as head of the National American Women Suffrage Association, argued that it was the "duty" of U.S. women to help lift the inhabitants of its new island possessions up from "barbarism" to "civilization," a project that would presumably demonstrate the capacity of U.S. women for full citizenship and political rights. Catt, like many suffragists in her day, was well-versed in the language of empire, and infused the cause of suffrage with imperialist zeal in public debate. Unlike their predecessors, who were working for votes for women within the context of slavery and abolition, the next generation of suffragists argued their case against the backdrop of the U.S. expansionism into Indian and Mormon territory at home as well as overseas in the Philippines, Puerto Rico, and Hawaii. In this book, Allison L. Sneider carefully examines these simultaneous political movements--woman suffrage and American imperialism--as inextricably intertwined phenomena, instructively complicating the histories of both.

Manliness and Its Discontents

The Black Middle Class and the Transformation of Masculinity, 1900-1930

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Author: Martin Summers

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 080786417X

Category: Social Science

Page: 400

View: 3712

In a pathbreaking new assessment of the shaping of black male identity in the early twentieth century, Martin Summers explores how middle-class African American and African Caribbean immigrant men constructed a gendered sense of self through organizational life, work, leisure, and cultural production. Examining both the public and private aspects of gender formation, Summers challenges the current trajectory of masculinity studies by treating black men as historical agents in their own identity formation, rather than as screens on which white men projected their own racial and gender anxieties and desires. Manliness and Its Discontents focuses on four distinct yet overlapping social milieus: the fraternal order of Prince Hall Freemasonry; the black nationalist Universal Negro Improvement Association, or the Garvey movement; the modernist circles of the Harlem Renaissance; and the campuses of historically black Howard and Fisk Universities. Between 1900 and 1930, Summers argues, dominant notions of what it meant to be a man within the black middle class changed from a Victorian ideal of manliness--characterized by the importance of producer values, respectability, and patriarchy--to a modern ethos of masculinity, which was shaped more by consumption, physicality, and sexuality. Summers evaluates the relationships between black men and black women as well as relationships among black men themselves, broadening our understanding of the way that gender works along with class, sexuality, and age to shape identities and produce relationships of power.

Southern Cultures

Volume 20: Number 4 – Winter 2014 Issue

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Author: Harry L. Watson,Jocelyn Neal

Publisher: UNC Press Books

ISBN: 1469615967

Category: History

Page: 144

View: 7981

The Winter 2014 Issue brings us duels and Dashboard Poets, eels and faux villages, a beloved television icon, interviews with liberal hero Walter Mondale and conservative activist Jack Kershaw, Civil War battlefi eld monuments, and more. From familiar faces and famous legends to humble commemorations and invented histories, we explore the tensions between preservation and progress that have forged the region as we know it.

Gender, Race and Family in Nineteenth Century America

From Northern Woman to Plantation Mistress

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Author: Rebecca Fraser

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137291850

Category: History

Page: 218

View: 7429

Sarah Hicks Williams was the northern-born wife of an antebellum slaveholder. Rebecca Fraser traces her journey as she relocates to Clifton Grove, the Williams' slaveholding plantation, presenting her with complex dilemmas as she reconciled her new role as plantation mistress to the gender script she had been raised with in the North.

Mutiny at Fort Jackson

The Untold Story of the Fall of New Orleans

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Author: Michael D. Pierson

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 9780807887028

Category: History

Page: 264

View: 6049

New Orleans was the largest city--and one of the richest--in the Confederacy, protected in part by Fort Jackson, which was just sixty-five miles down the Mississippi River. On April 27, 1862, Confederate soldiers at Fort Jackson rose up in mutiny against their commanding officers. New Orleans fell to Union forces soon thereafter. Although the Fort Jackson mutiny marked a critical turning point in the Union's campaign to regain control of this vital Confederate financial and industrial center, it has received surprisingly little attention from historians. Michael Pierson examines newly uncovered archival sources to determine why the soldiers rebelled at such a decisive moment. The mutineers were soldiers primarily recruited from New Orleans's large German and Irish immigrant populations. Pierson shows that the new nation had done nothing to encourage poor white men to feel they had a place of honor in the southern republic. He argues that the mutineers actively sought to help the Union cause. In a major reassessment of the Union administration of New Orleans that followed, Pierson demonstrates that Benjamin "Beast" Butler enjoyed the support of many white Unionists in the city. Pierson adds an urban working-class element to debates over the effects of white Unionists in Confederate states. With the personal stories of soldiers appearing throughout, Mutiny at Fort Jackson presents the Civil War from a new perspective, revealing the complexities of New Orleans society and the Confederate experience.

On Faith and Free Government

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Author: Daniel C. Palm

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 9780847686032

Category: Political Science

Page: 201

View: 4406

Responding to the general confusion in the United States about the proper role of religion in politics, five distinguished scholars demonstrate in original essays how our nation's founders carefully and clearly defined the appropriate relationship between church and state, and how we can adapt our current political institutions to reflect the founders' wisdom. Also, includes a collection of the most important statements by the Founders that address religion's role in American political life.

Scarlet Book of Free Masonry

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Author: M.W. Redding

Publisher: Рипол Классик

ISBN: 5877656740

Category: History

Page: N.A

View: 4371

Scarlet Book of Free Masonry: Containing a Thrilling and Authentic Account of the Imprisonment, Torture, and Martyrdom of Free Masons and Knights Templars, for the Past Six Hundred Years.

Hearts and Minds

A People's History of Counterinsurgency

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Author: Hannah Gurman

Publisher: The New Press

ISBN: 1595588434

Category: History

Page: 304

View: 9318

The first book of its kind, Hearts and Minds is a scathing response to the grand narrative of U.S. counterinsurgency, in which warfare is defined not by military might alone but by winning the "hearts and minds" of civilians. Dormant as a tactic since the days of the Vietnam War, in 2006 the U.S. Army drafted a new field manual heralding the resurrection of counterinsurgency as a primary military engagement strategy; counterinsurgency campaigns followed in Iraq and Afghanistan, despite the fact that counterinsurgency had utterly failed to account for the actual lived experiences of the people whose hearts and minds America had sought to win. Drawing on leading thinkers in the field and using key examples from Malaya, the Philippines, Vietnam, El Salvador, Iraq, and Afghanistan, Hearts and Minds brings a long-overdue focus on the many civilians caught up in these conflicts. Both urgent and timely, this important book challenges the idea of a neat divide between insurgents and the populations from which they emerge—and should be required reading for anyone engaged in the most important contemporary debates over U.S. military policy.

Free as a Global Nomad

An Old Tradition with a Modern Twist

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Author: Päivi Kannisto, Santeri Kannisto

Publisher: Drifting Sands Press

ISBN: 0985009624

Category:

Page: 174

View: 542

How does it feel to be forever on the move? Who are global nomads? Why did they leave their former lives? How do they finance their travels? And, ultimately, what is the meaning of life for them? In this book our fellow global nomads, travelers who wander the world without a permanent job or home, answer these intriguing questions. They are modern-day adventurers and vagrants, no one's property. Global nomads value freedom and mastery of their own lives. Their ideas draw from the everyday life and dreams of explorers, philosophers, and vagrants, some notable pioneers including Alexander the Great, Jean-Jacques Rousseau, and George Orwell. This book shows how global nomads revive the ancient ideals of a simple and beautiful life. In the process, home, nationality, freedom, and travel get a new meaning that will permanently change the way in which we perceive the world.