First-Year Composition

From Theory to Practice

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Author: Deborah Coxwell-Teague,Ronald F. Lunsford

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781602355194

Category: Education

Page: 422

View: 8324

Responding to a widespread belief that the field of composition studies is less unified than it was in the late twentieth century, the editors have asked twelve well-known composition theorists to create detailed syllabi for a first-year composition course and then to explain their theoretical foundations. Each contributor discusses the major goals and objectives for their course, its major assignments, their use of outside texts, the role of reading and responding to these texts, the nature of classroom discussion, their methods of responding to student writing, and their assessment methods. Their twelve essays provide a window into these teachers' classrooms that will help readers, teachers, and writing program administrators appreciate the strengths of unity and diversity in rhetoric and composition as a field. The editors frame the twelve essays with an introductory chapter that identifies key moments in composition's history and a concluding chapter that highlights the varied and useful ways the contributors approach the common challenges of the first-year composition course. -- From publisher's website.

Strategies for Teaching First-year Composition

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Author: Duane H. Roen

Publisher: National Council of Teachers

ISBN: N.A

Category: Education

Page: 626

View: 2803

Whether the new instructor of first-year composition looks forward to that first class period with anticipation, dread, or a mix of emotions, Strategies for Teaching First-Year Composition offers guidance, reassurance, and thoughtful commentary on the many activities leading up to and surrounding classroom instruction: What preparation do I need to teach first-year comp? How do I construct a syllabus? How do I develop effective writing assignments? Why am I teaching writing at all? And what's the place of writing in a university education? The texts included in this collection respond to these questions and many others with ideas, suggestions, and experiences from both veteran and new teachers. And because writing instruction takes place in a variety of educational contexts, readers will find chapters and suggestions written by instructors who teach in community colleges, liberal arts colleges, state university systems, and research institutions.--Publisher description.

Writing New Media

Theory and Applications for Expanding the Teaching of Composition

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Author: Anne Wysocki

Publisher: University Press of Colorado

ISBN: 0874214939

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 280

View: 6376

As new media mature, the changes they bring to writing in college are many and suggest implications not only for the tools of writing, but also for the contexts, personae, and conventions of writing. An especially visible change has been the increase of visual elements-from typographic flexibility to the easy use and manipulation of color and images. Another would be in the scenes of writing-web sites, presentation "slides," email, online conferencing and coursework, even help files, all reflect non-traditional venues that new media have brought to writing. By one logic, we must reconsider traditional views even of what counts as writing; a database, for example, could be a new form of written work. The authors of Writing New Media bring these ideas and the changes they imply for writing instruction to the audience of rhetoric/composition scholars. Their aim is to expand the college writing teacher's understanding of new media and to help teachers prepare students to write effectively with new media beyond the classroom. Each chapter in the volume includes a lengthy discussion of rhetorical and technological background, and then follows with classroom-tested assignments from the authors' own teaching.

First Time Up

An Insider'S Guide For New Composition Teachers

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Author: Brock Dethier

Publisher: Utah State University Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: Education

Page: 220

View: 8229

"First time up?"—an insider’s friendly question from 1960s counter-culture—perfectly captures the spirit of this book. A short, supportive, practical guide for the first-time college composition instructor, the book is upbeat, wise but friendly, casual but knowledgeable (like the voice that may have introduced you to certain other firsts). With an experiential focus rather than a theoretical one, First Time Up will be a strong addition to the newcomer’s professional library, and a great candidate for the TA practicum reading list. Dethier, author of The Composition Instructor’s Survival Guide and From Dylan to Donne, directly addresses the common headaches, nightmares, and epiphanies of composition teaching—especially the ones that face the new teacher. And since legions of new college composition teachers are either graduate instructors (TAs) or adjuncts without a formal background in composition studies, he assumes these folks as his primary audience. Dethier’s voice is casual, but it conveys concern, humor, experience, and reassurance to the first-timer. He addresses all major areas that graduate instructors or new adjuncts in a writing program are sure to face, from career anxiety to thoughts on grading and keeping good classroom records. Dethier’s own eclecticism is well-represented here, but he reviews with considerable deftness the value of contemporary scholarship to first-time writing instructors—many of whom will be impatient with high theory. Throughout the work, he affirms a humane, confident approach to teaching, along with a true affection for college students and for teachers just learning to deal with them.

College Writing and Beyond

A New Framework for University Writing Instruction

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Author: Anne Beaufort

Publisher: University Press of Colorado

ISBN: 087421663X

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 232

View: 2920

Composition research consistently demonstrates that the social context of writing determines the majority of conventions any writer must observe. Still, most universities organize the required first-year composition course as if there were an intuitive set of general writing "skills" usable across academic and work-world settings. In College Writing and Beyond: A New Framework for University Writing Instruction, Anne Beaufort reports on a longitudinal study comparing one student’s experience in FYC, in history, in engineering, and in his post-college writing. Her data illuminate the struggle of college students to transfer what they learn about "general writing" from one context to another. Her findings suggest ultimately not that we must abolish FYC, but that we must go beyond even genre theory in reconceiving it. Accordingly, Beaufort would argue that the FYC course should abandon its hope to teach a sort of general academic discourse, and instead should systematically teach strategies of responding to contextual elements that impinge on the writing situation. Her data urge attention to issues of learning transfer, and to developmentally sound linkages in writing instruction within and across disciplines. Beaufort advocates special attention to discourse community theory, for its power to help students perceive and understand the context of writing.

Agents of Integration

Understanding Transfer as a Rhetorical Act

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Author: Rebecca S. Nowacek

Publisher: SIU Press

ISBN: 0809330482

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 167

View: 5466

The question of how students transfer knowledge is an important one, as it addresses the larger issue of the educational experience. In Agents of Integration: Understanding Transfer as a Rhetorical Act, Rebecca S. Nowacek explores, through a series of case studies, the issue of transfer by asking what in an educational setting engages students to become “agents of integration”— individuals actively working to perceive, as well as to convey effectively to others, the connections they make. While many studies of transfer are longitudinal, with data collected over several years, Nowacek’s is synchronous, a rich cross-section of the writing and classroom discussions produced by a team-taught learning community—three professors and eighteen students enrolled in a one-semester general education interdisciplinary humanities seminar that consisted of three linked courses in history, literature, and religious studies. With extensive field notes, carefully selected student and teacher self-reports in the form of interviews and focus groups, and thorough examinations of recorded classroom discussions, student papers with professor comments, and student notebooks, Nowacek presents a nuanced and engaging analysis that outlines how transfer is not simply a cognitive act but a rhetorical one that involves both seeing connections and presenting them to the instructors who are institutionally positioned to recognize and value them. Considering the challenges facing instructors teaching for transfer and the transfer of writing-related knowledge, Nowacek develops and outlines a new theoretical framework and methodological model of transfer and illustrates the practical implications through case studies and other classroom examples. She proposes transfer is best understood as an act of recontextualization, and she builds on this premise throughout the book by drawing from previous work in cognitive psychology, activity theory, and rhetorical genre theory, as well as her own analyses of student work. This focused examination complements existing longitudinal studies and will help readers better understand not only the opportunities and challenges confronting students as they work to become agents of integration but also the challenges facing instructors as they seek to support that student work.

Toward a Composition Made Whole

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Author: Jody Shipka

Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Pre

ISBN: 0822977788

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 176

View: 9657

To many academics, composition still represents typewritten texts on 8.5” x 11” pages that follow rote argumentative guidelines. In Toward a Composition Made Whole, Jody Shipka views composition as an act of communication that can be expressed through any number of media and as a path to meaning-making. Her study offers an in-depth examination of multimodality via the processes, values, structures, and semiotic practices people employ everyday to compose and communicate their thoughts. Shipka counters current associations that equate multimodality only with computer, digitized, or screen-mediated texts, which are often self-limiting. She stretches the boundaries of composition to include a hybridization of aural, visual, and written forms. Shipka analyzes the work of current scholars in multimodality and combines this with recent writing theory to create her own teaching framework. Among her methods, Shipka employs process-oriented reflection and a statement of goals and choices to prepare students to compose using various media in ways that spur their rhetorical and material awareness. They are encouraged to produce unusual text forms while also learning to understand the composition process as a whole. Shipka presents several case studies of students working in multimodal composition and explains the strategies, tools, and spaces they employ. She then offers methods to critically assess multimodal writing projects. Toward a Composition Made Whole challenges theorists and compositionists to further investigate communication practices and broaden the scope of writing to include all composing methods. While Shipka views writing as crucial to discourse, she challenges us to always consider the various purposes that writing serves.

Cross-Talk in Comp Theory

A Reader

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Author: Victor Villanueva,Kristin L. Arola

Publisher: National Council of Teachers

ISBN: 9780814109779

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 899

View: 581

Teaching Composition: Background Readings

Background Readings

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Author: T. R. Johnson

Publisher: Macmillan Higher Education

ISBN: 1319007473

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 592

View: 1960

Addressing the concerns of both first-year and veteran writing instructors, this collection includes 30 professional readings on composition and rhetoric written by leaders in the field, accompanied by helpful introductions and activities for the classroom. The new edition offers up-to-date advice on helping students avoid plagiarism, improving online instruction, blogging, and more.

Personally Speaking

Experience as Evidence in Academic Discourse

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Author: Candace Spigelman

Publisher: SIU Press

ISBN: 080932590X

Category: Education

Page: 180

View: 1799

Responding to contemporary discussion about using personal accounts in academic writing, Personally Speaking: Experience as Evidence in Academic Discourse draws on classical and current rhetorical theory, feminist theory, and relevant examples from both published writers and first-year writing students to illustrate the advantages of blending experiential and academic perspectives. Candace Spigelman examines how merging personal and scholarly worldviews produces useful contradictions and contributes to a more a complex understanding in academic writing. This rhetorical move allows for greater insights than the reading or writing of experiential or academic modes separately does. Personally Speaking foregrounds the semi-fictitious nature of personal stories and the rhetorical possibilities of evidence as Spigelman provides strategies for writing instructors who want to teach personal academic argument while supplying practical mechanisms for evaluating experiential claims. The volume seeks to complicate and intensify disciplinary debates about how compositionists should write for publication and what kinds of writing should be taught to composition students. Spigelman not only supplies evidence as to why the personal can count as evidence but also relates how to use it effectively by including student samples that reflect particular features of personal writing. Finally, she lays the groundwork to move narrative from its current site as confessional writing to the domain of academic discourse.

Writing as a Way of Being

Writing Instruction, Nonduality, and the Crisis of Sustainability

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Author: Robert Yagelski

Publisher: Hampton Press (NJ)

ISBN: 9781612890562

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 192

View: 7418

In this careful examination of the nature of writing, Robert Yagelski demonstrates that the experience of writing, apart from the text that is produced through writing, can be deeply transformative for both individuals and communities. Writing as a Way of Being presents a dramatic new way to understand writing as an ontological act at a time of unprecedented social, educational, and environmental change. This book offers hope in the form of a pedagogy of writing as an ethical practice of being in the world. It describes a way to harness the power of writing so that writing instruction can become part of a broader effort to imagine and create a more just and sustainable future.

Writing across Contexts

Transfer, Composition, and Sites of Writing

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Author: Kathleen Yancey,Liane Robertson,Kara Taczak

Publisher: University Press of Colorado

ISBN: 0874219388

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 215

View: 2275

Addressing how composers transfer both knowledge about and practices of writing, Writing across Contexts explores the grounding theory behind a specific composition curriculum called Teaching for Transfer (TFT) and analyzes the efficacy of the approach. Finding that TFT courses aid students in transfer in ways that other kinds of composition courses do not, the authors demonstrate that the content of this curriculum, including its reflective practice, provides a unique set of resources for students to call on and repurpose for new writing tasks. The authors provide a brief historical review, give attention to current curricular efforts designed to promote such transfer, and develop new insights into the role of prior knowledge in students' ability to transfer writing knowledge and practice, presenting three models of how students respond to and use new knowledge—assemblage, remix, and critical incident. A timely and significant contribution to the field, Writing across Contexts will be of interest to graduate students, composition scholars, WAC and writing-in-the-disciplines scholars, and writing program administrators.

Writing Relationships

What Really Happens in the Composition Class

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Author: Lad Tobin

Publisher: Boynton/Cook

ISBN: N.A

Category: Education

Page: 156

View: 3592

Writing Relationships goes beyond the idealized talk about what should happen in process teaching to examine what actually occurs.

Naming What We Know

Threshold Concepts of Writing Studies

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Author: Linda Adler-Kassner,Elizabeth Wardle

Publisher: University Press of Colorado

ISBN: 0874219906

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 256

View: 1242

Naming What We Know examines the core principles of knowledge in the discipline of writing studies using the lens of “threshold concepts”—concepts that are critical for epistemological participation in a discipline. The first part of the book defines and describes thirty-seven threshold concepts of the discipline in entries written by some of the field’s most active researchers and teachers, all of whom participated in a collaborative wiki discussion guided by the editors. These entries are clear and accessible, written for an audience of writing scholars, students, and colleagues in other disciplines and policy makers outside the academy. Contributors describe the conceptual background of the field and the principles that run throughout practice, whether in research, teaching, assessment, or public work around writing. Chapters in the second part of the book describe the benefits and challenges of using threshold concepts in specific sites—first-year writing programs, WAC/WID programs, writing centers, writing majors—and for professional development to present this framework in action. Naming What We Know opens a dialogue about the concepts that writing scholars and teachers agree are critical and about why those concepts should and do matter to people outside the field.

Teaching Writing Online

How and why

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Author: Scott Warnock

Publisher: National Council of Teachers

ISBN: 9780814152539

Category: Computers

Page: 235

View: 555

"Teaching Writing Online: How and Why. Warnock explores how to teach an online (or hybrid) writing course by emphasizing the importance of using and managing students' written communications. Grounded in Warnock's years of experience in teaching, teacher preparation, online learning, and composition scholarship, this book is designed with usability in mind. Features include: How to manage online conversations; Responding to students; Organizing course material; Core guidelines for teaching online; Resource chapter and appendix with sample teaching materials."--Back cover.

A Rhetoric for Writing Teachers

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Author: Erika Lindemann,Daniel Anderson

Publisher: Oxford University Press, USA

ISBN: 9780195130454

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 346

View: 8719

From answering the question "Why teach writing?" to offering guidance in managing group work and responding to assignments, A Rhetoric for Writing Teachers provides a comprehensive introduction to the teaching of writing. Now in a fourth edition, this remarkably successful book features a new chapter by Daniel Anderson on teaching with computers and adds updated material on invention, intellectual development, and responding to students' writing. Describing in straightforward terms the cross-disciplinary scholarship that underlies composition teaching, it opens with chapters on prewriting techniques, organizing material, paragraphing, sentence structure, words, and revising that show teachers how to lead students through composing. Sections on writing workshops, collaborative learning, and instructional technology reflect current views of writing as a social interaction. Chapters on rhetoric, cognition, and linguistics explain theoretical principles that support classroom practices and make teachers' performances more effective. Treating both the theory and practice of writing, this classic book encourages teachers to adopt the methods that best meet their students' needs and to develop a style of teaching based on informed decisions. It provides an extensive updated bibliography--including useful Web sites as well as important books and articles--and an updated table of important dates in the history of composition. A Rhetoric for Writing Teachers, 4/e, offers both prospective and seasoned writing teachers convenient access to influential scholarship in the field and inspires them to examine what it means to teach well.

Keywords in Writing Studies

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Author: Paul Heilker,John Vandenbergh

Publisher: University Press of Colorado

ISBN: 1457193485

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 224

View: 5277

Keywords in Writing Studies is an exploration of the principal ideas and ideals of an emerging academic field as they are constituted by its specialized vocabulary. A sequel to the 1996 work Keywords in Composition Studies, this new volume traces the evolution of the field’s lexicon, taking into account the wide variety of theoretical, educational, professional, and institutional developments that have redefined it over the past two decades. Contributors address the development, transformation, and interconnections among thirty-six of the most critical terms that make up writing studies. Looking beyond basic definitions or explanations, they explore the multiple layers of meaning within the terms that writing scholars currently use, exchange, and question. Each term featured is a part of the general disciplinary parlance, and each is a highly contested focal point of significant debates about matters of power, identity, and values. Each essay begins with the assumption that its central term is important precisely because its meaning is open and multiplex. Keywords in Writing Studies reveals how the key concepts in the field are used and even challenged, rather than advocating particular usages and the particular vision of the field that they imply. The volume will be of great interest to both graduate students and established scholars.

Defining Visual Rhetorics

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Author: Charles A. Hill,Marguerite Helmers

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135628548

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 356

View: 6277

Images play an important role in developing consciousness and the relationship of the self to its surroundings. In this distinctive collection, editors Charles A. Hill and Marguerite Helmers examine the connection between visual images and persuasion, or how images act rhetorically upon viewers. Chapters included here highlight the differences and commonalities among a variety of projects identified as "visual rhetoric," leading to a more precise definition of the term and its role in rhetorical studies. Contributions to this volume consider a wide variety of sites of image production--from architecture to paintings, from film to needlepoint--in order to understand how images and texts work upon readers as symbolic forms of representation. Each chapter discusses, analyzes, and explains the visual aspect of a particular subject, and illustrates the ways in which messages and meaning are communicated visually. The contributions include work from rhetoric scholars in the English and communication disciplines, and represent a variety of methodologies--theoretical, textual analysis, psychological research, and cultural studies, among others. The editors seek to demonstrate that every new turn in the study of rhetorical practices reveals more possibilities for discussion, and that the recent "turn to the visual" has revealed an inexhaustible supply of new questions, problems, and objects for investigation. As a whole, the chapters presented here demonstrate the wide range of scholarship that is possible when a field begins to take seriously the analysis of images as important cultural and rhetorical forces. Defining Visual Rhetorics is appropriate for graduate or advanced undergraduate courses in rhetoric, English, mass communication, cultural studies, technical communication, and visual studies. It will also serve as an insightful resource for researchers, scholars, and educators interested in rhetoric, cultural studies, and communication studies.

Reconnecting Reading and Writing

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Author: Alice S. Horning,Elizabeth W. Kraemer

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781602354593

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 325

View: 6084

"Reconnecting Reading and Writing explores the ways in which reading can and should have a strong role in the teaching of writing in college, draw[ing] on broad perspectives from history and international work to help readers understand how and why reading should be re-united with writing in college and high school classrooms. It presents an overview of relevant research on reading and how it can best be used to support and enhance writing instruction. [The book] also examines research in such areas as basic writing, second language learning, and information literacy to integrate reading in writing classrooms, as well as the impact of the new Common Core State Standards in K-12 schools and the digital revolution on the teaching of reading and writing together. [It] offers practical advice on useful textbooks and appropriate classroom practices"--Publisher description.

Composition-Rhetoric

Backgrounds, Theory, and Pedagogy

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Author: Robert Connors

Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Pre

ISBN: 0822971828

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 384

View: 2612

Connors provides a history of composition and its pedagogical approaches to form, genre, and correctness. He shows where many of the today’s practices and assumptions about writing come from, and he translates what our techniques and theories of teaching have said over time about our attitudes toward students, language and life. Connors locates the beginning of a new rhetorical tradition in the mid-nineteenth century, and from there, he discusses the theoretical and pedagogical innovations of the last two centuries as the result of historical forces, social needs, and cultural shifts. This important book proves that American composition-rhetoric is a genuine, rhetorical tradition with its own evolving theria and praxis. As such it is an essential reference for all teachers of English and students of American education.