Earl Warren and the Struggle for Justice

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Author: Paul Moke

Publisher: Lexington Books

ISBN: 1498520146

Category: Law

Page: 394

View: 9172

Earl Warren and the Strugglefor Justice explores the remarkable life of one of the leading public figures and jurists of twentieth century America. Based on newly available source materials, it traces Warren’s progressive vision of government from its origins in the fight against urban corruption in Oakland, California during the 1930s to its culmination in the effort to professionalize public school administration, law enforcement, and the management of the electoral process under the auspices of the U.S. Constitution. Although Warren’s major social justice decisions strengthened democracy at a crucial juncture in American and world history, in times of crisis his excessive deference to national security officials sometimes jeopardized other core human rights, as shown in his approaches to the Japanese internment and the investigation into the assassination of President John Kennedy. The book offers accessible and fresh insights into the dynamics of the Supreme Court and the accomplishments of Earl Warren, the man, jurist, and political leader.

Simple Justice

The History of Brown V. Board of Education and Black America's Struggle for Equality

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Author: Richard Kluger

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 9780394722559

Category: Segregation in education

Page: 823

View: 8196

Details the historical and cultural roots of and the various litigations and court decisions leading to the Supreme Court's historic 1954 Brown decision

Justice for All

Earl Warren and the Nation He Made

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Author: Jim Newton

Publisher: Riverhead Books (Hardcover)

ISBN: N.A

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 614

View: 3058

Earl Warren played a key role in nearly every defining political moment in American history in the latter half of the twentieth century. He began as an aggressive county prosecutor offended by graft and vice, then rose through California politics. As atto

Earl Warren

Justice for All

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Author: Christine L. Compston

Publisher: Oxford University Press

ISBN: 0195130014

Category: Juvenile Nonfiction

Page: 159

View: 9211

Examines the life of the influential Supreme Court justice who made decisions that were politically unpopular during such notable twentieth-century events as World War II and the civil rights movement.

Eisenhower vs. Warren: The Battle for Civil Rights and Liberties

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Author: James F. Simon

Publisher: Liveright Publishing

ISBN: 0871407663

Category: History

Page: 464

View: 6232

The epic 1950s battle that would shape the legal future of the civil rights movement is chronicled here for the first time. The bitter feud between President Dwight D. Eisenhower and Chief Justice Earl Warren framed the tumultuous future of the modern civil rights movement. Eisenhower was a gradualist who wanted to coax white Americans in the South into eventually accepting integration, while Warren, author of the Supreme Court’s historic unanimous opinion in Brown v. Board of Education, demanded immediate action to dismantle the segregation of the public school system. In Eisenhower vs. Warren, two-time New York Times Notable Book author James F. Simon examines the years of strife between them that led Eisenhower to say that his biggest mistake as president was appointing that “dumb son of a bitch Earl Warren.” This momentous, poisonous relationship is presented here at last in one volume. Compellingly written, Eisenhower vs. Warren brings to vivid life the clash that continues to reverberate in political and constitutional debates today.

A Matter of Justice

Eisenhower and the Beginning of the Civil Rights Revolution

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Author: David A. Nichols

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1416545549

Category: History

Page: 368

View: 300

Fifty years after President Dwight D. Eisenhower ordered troops to Little Rock, Arkansas, to enforce a federal court order desegregating the city's Central High School, a leading authority on Eisenhower presents an original and engrossing narrative that places Ike and his civil rights policies in dramatically new light. Historians such as Stephen Ambrose and Arthur Schlesinger, Jr., have portrayed Eisenhower as aloof, if not outwardly hostile, to the plight of African-Americans in the 1950s. It is still widely assumed that he opposed the Supreme Court's landmark 1954 Brown v. Board of Education decision mandating the desegregation of public schools, that he deeply regretted appointing Earl Warren as the Court's chief justice because of his role in molding Brown, that he was a bystander in Congress's passage of the civil rights acts of 1957 and 1960, and that he so mishandled the Little Rock crisis that he was forced to dispatch troops to rescue a failed policy. In this sweeping narrative, David A. Nichols demonstrates that these assumptions are wrong. Drawing on archival documents neglected by biographers and scholars, including thousands of pages newly available from the Eisenhower Presidential Library, Nichols takes us inside the Oval Office to look over Ike's shoulder as he worked behind the scenes, prior to Brown, to desegregate the District of Columbia and complete the desegregation of the armed forces. We watch as Eisenhower, assisted by his close collaborator, Attorney General Herbert Brownell, Jr., sifted through candidates for federal judgeships and appointed five pro-civil rights justices to the Supreme Court and progressive judges to lower courts. We witness Eisenhower crafting civil rights legislation, deftly building a congressional coalition that passed the first civil rights act in eighty-two years, and maneuvering to avoid a showdown with Orval Faubus, the governor of Arkansas, over desegregation of Little Rock's Central High. Nichols demonstrates that Eisenhower, though he was a product of his time and its backward racial attitudes, was actually more progressive on civil rights in the 1950s than his predecessor, Harry Truman, and his successors, John F. Kennedy and Lyndon Johnson. Eisenhower was more a man of deeds than of words and preferred quiet action over grandstanding. His cautious public rhetoric -- especially his legalistic response to Brown -- gave a misleading impression that he was not committed to the cause of civil rights. In fact, Eisenhower's actions laid the legal and political groundwork for the more familiar breakthroughs in civil rights achieved in the 1960s. Fair, judicious, and exhaustively researched, A Matter of Justice is the definitive book on Eisenhower's civil rights policies that every presidential historian and future biographer of Ike will have to contend with.

Justice Accused

Antislavery and the Judicial Process

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Author: Robert M. Cover

Publisher: Yale University Press

ISBN: 9780300032529

Category: Law

Page: 322

View: 6838

What should a judge do when he must hand down a ruling based on a law that he considers unjust or oppressive? This question is examined through a series of problems concerning unjust law that arose with respect to slavery in nineteenth-century America. Cover's book is splendid in many ways. His legal history and legal philosophy are both first class...This is, for a change, an interdisciplinary work that is a credit to both disciplines.-Ronald Dworkin, Times Literary Supplement Scholars should be grateful to Cover for his often brilliant illumination of tensions created in judges by changing eighteenth- and nineteenth-century jurisprudential attitudes and legal standards...An exciting adventure in interdisciplinary history.-Harold M. Hyman, American Historical Review A most articulate, sophisticated, and learned defense of legal formalism...Deserves and needs to be widely read.-Don Roper, Journal of American History An excellent illustration of the way in which a burning moral issue relates to the American judicial process. The book thus has both historical value and a very immediate importance.-Edwards A.Stettner, Annals of the American Academy of Political and Social Science A really fine book, an important contribution to law and to history.-Louis H. Pollak

Scorpions

The Battles and Triumphs of FDR's Great Supreme Court Justices

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Author: Noah Feldman

Publisher: Twelve

ISBN: 0446575143

Category: History

Page: 528

View: 812

A tiny, ebullient Jew who started as America's leading liberal and ended as its most famous judicial conservative. A Klansman who became an absolutist advocate of free speech and civil rights. A backcountry lawyer who started off trying cases about cows and went on to conduct the most important international trial ever. A self-invented, tall-tale Westerner who narrowly missed the presidency but expanded individual freedom beyond what anyone before had dreamed. Four more different men could hardly be imagined. Yet they had certain things in common. Each was a self-made man who came from humble beginnings on the edge of poverty. Each had driving ambition and a will to succeed. Each was, in his own way, a genius. They began as close allies and friends of FDR, but the quest to shape a new Constitution led them to competition and sometimes outright warfare. SCORPIONS tells the story of these four great justices: their relationship with Roosevelt, with each other, and with the turbulent world of the Great Depression, World War II, and the Cold War. It also serves as a history of the modern Constitution itself.

The Warren Court and the Pursuit of Justice

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Author: Morton J. Horwitz

Publisher: Macmillan

ISBN: 9780809016259

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 132

View: 548

The Hill and Wang Critical Issues Series: concise, affordable works on pivotal topics in American history, society, and politics. The men who made up the Supreme Court when Earl Warren was Chief Justice (1953-69) changed America forever, and their decisions are still affecting constitutional law today. This overview of the Warren Court focuses on its landmark cases and enduring legacy.

A People's History of the Supreme Court

The Men and Women Whose Cases and Decisions Have Shaped OurConstitution: Revised Edition

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Author: Peter Irons

Publisher: Penguin

ISBN: 9781101503133

Category: Political Science

Page: 576

View: 5046

A comprehensive history of the people and cases that have changed history, this is the definitive account of the nation's highest court Recent changes in the Supreme Court have placed the venerable institution at the forefront of current affairs, making this comprehensive and engaging work as timely as ever. In the tradition of Howard Zinn's classic A People's History of the United States, Peter Irons chronicles the decisions that have influenced virtually every aspect of our society, from the debates over judicial power to controversial rulings in the past regarding slavery, racial segregation, and abortion, as well as more current cases about school prayer, the Bush/Gore election results, and "enemy combatants." To understand key issues facing the supreme court and the current battle for the court's ideological makeup, there is no better guide than Peter Irons. This revised and updated edition includes a foreword by Howard Zinn. "A sophisticated narrative history of the Supreme Court . . . [Irons] breathes abundant life into old documents and reminds readers that today's fiercest arguments about rights are the continuation of the endless American conversation." -Publisher's Weekly (starred review)

The Burger Court and the Rise of the Judicial Right

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Author: Michael J. Graetz,Linda Greenhouse

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1476732515

Category: History

Page: 480

View: 3742

A revelatory look at the Warren Burger Supreme Court finds that it was not moderate or transitional, but conservative—and it shaped today’s constitutional landscape. It is an “important book…a powerful corrective to the standard narrative of the Burger Court” (The New York Times Book Review). When Richard Nixon campaigned for the presidency in 1968 he promised to change the Supreme Court. With four appointments to the court, including Warren E. Burger as the chief justice, he did just that. In 1969, the Burger Court succeeded the famously liberal Warren Court, which had significantly expanded civil liberties and was despised by conservatives across the country. The Burger Court is often described as a “transitional” court between the Warren Court and the Rehnquist and Roberts Courts, a court where little of importance happened. But as this “landmark new book” (The Christian Science Monitor) shows, the Burger Court veered well to the right in such areas as criminal law, race, and corporate power. Authors Graetz and Greenhouse excavate the roots of the most significant Burger Court decisions and in “elegant, illuminating arguments” (The Washington Post) show how their legacy affects us today. “Timely and engaging” (Richmond Times-Dispatch), The Burger Court and the Rise of the Judicial Right draws on the personal papers of the justices as well as other archives to provide “the best kind of legal history: cogent, relevant, and timely” (Publishers Weekly).

Fortas

the rise and ruin of a Supreme Court Justice

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Author: Bruce Allen Murphy

Publisher: William Morrow & Co

ISBN: N.A

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 717

View: 3665

Captures the saga of a brilliant career gone sour in a chronicle of the nation's first Jewish Supreme Court Justice, who was forced to resign in disgrace, and examines newly acquired evidence concerning the case

Five Chiefs

A Supreme Court Memoir

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Author: John Paul Stevens

Publisher: Little, Brown

ISBN: 0316199788

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 304

View: 3447

When he resigned last June, Justice Stevens was the third longest serving Justice in American history (1975-2010)--only Justice William O. Douglas, whom Stevens succeeded, and Stephen Field have served on the Court for a longer time. In Five Chiefs, Justice Stevens captures the inner workings of the Supreme Court via his personal experiences with the five Chief Justices--Fred Vinson, Earl Warren, Warren Burger, William Rehnquist, and John Roberts--that he interacted with. He reminisces of being a law clerk during Vinson's tenure; a practicing lawyer for Warren; a circuit judge and junior justice for Burger; a contemporary colleague of Rehnquist; and a colleague of current Chief Justice John Roberts. Along the way, he will discuss his views of some the most significant cases that have been decided by the Court from Vinson, who became Chief Justice in 1946 when Truman was President, to Roberts, who became Chief Justice in 2005. Packed with interesting anecdotes and stories about the Court, Five Chiefs is an unprecedented and historically significant look at the highest court in the United States.

The Age of Eisenhower

America and the World in the 1950s

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Author: William I Hitchcock

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1451698437

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 672

View: 2073

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER “A page-turner masterpiece.” —Jim Lehrer In a 2017 survey, presidential historians ranked Dwight D. Eisenhower fifth on the list of great presidents, behind the perennial top four: Lincoln, Washington, Franklin D. Roosevelt, and Teddy Roosevelt. Historian William Hitchcock shows that this high ranking is justified. Eisenhower’s accomplishments were enormous, and loom ever larger from the vantage point of our own tumultuous times. A former general, Ike kept the peace: he ended the Korean War, avoided a war in Vietnam, adroitly managed a potential confrontation with China, and soothed relations with the Soviet Union after Stalin’s death. He guided the Republican Party to embrace central aspects of the New Deal like Social Security. He thwarted the demagoguery of McCarthy and he advanced the agenda of civil rights for African Americans. As part of his strategy to wage, and win, the Cold War, Eisenhower expanded American military power, built a fearsome nuclear arsenal and launched the space race. In his famous Farewell Address, he acknowledged that Americans needed such weapons in order to keep global peace—but he also admonished his citizens to remain alert to the potentially harmful influence of the “military-industrial complex.” From 1953 to 1961, no one dominated the world stage as did President Dwight D. Eisenhower. The Age of Eisenhower is the definitive account of this presidency, drawing extensively on declassified material from the Eisenhower Library, the CIA and Defense Department, and troves of unpublished documents. In his masterful account, Hitchcock shows how Ike shaped modern America, and he astutely assesses Eisenhower’s close confidants, from Attorney General Brownell to Secretary of State Dulles. The result is an eye-opening reevaluation that explains why this “do-nothing” president is rightly regarded as one of the best leaders our country has ever had.

Chief Justice

A Biography of Earl Warren

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Author: Ed Cray

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 0684808528

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 603

View: 7940

Traces the life and career of the former Chief Justice of the Supreme Court, including his role as head of the Warren Commission, and assesses his impact on American society

Children of Armenia

A Forgotten Genocide and the Century-long Struggle for Justice

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Author: Michael Bobelian

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1416558357

Category: History

Page: 320

View: 7791

From 1915 to 1923, the Ottoman Empire drove the Armenians from their ancestral homeland and slaughtered 1.5 million of them in the process. While there was an initial global outcry and a movement led by Woodrow Wilson to aid the “starving Armenians,” the promises to hold the perpetrators accountable were never fulfilled. In this groundbreaking work, Michael Bobelian profiles the leading players—Armenian activists and assassins, Turkish diplomats, U.S. officials— each of whom played a significant role in furthering or opposing the century-long Armenian quest for justice in the face of Turkish denial of its crimes, and reveals the events that have conspired to eradicate the “forgotten Genocide” from the world’s memory.

Race and the Supreme Court

Defining Equality

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Author: Earl E. Pollock

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781614931034

Category: African Americans

Page: 346

View: 4867

"As Chief Justice Earl Warren's law clerk on Brown v. Board of Education in 1954, Earl E. Pollock worked on race and the meaning of equality under the U.S. Constitution. This book, based on Pollock's lifetime of distinguished law practice, teaching and deep research, is a thorough, thoughtful survey of the history and law of race in America. It is an invaluable, necessary primer for every lawyer, student or citizen who wants to understand the core continuing legal and societal issue of the United States." - John Q. Barrett, Professor of Law at St. John's University and biographer of Justice Robert H. Jackson. "This is an enlightening and important book that will be compelling to anyone who has every wondered about how we incorporate the notion of equality into our society and our laws. The writing is wonderfully lucid, and Earl Pollock's thinking about the many different notions of equality with which the law has struggled is as precise as a watchmaker." - Scott Turow, author of best-selling legal novels including Presumed Innocent and Innocent "An insightful and comprehensive analysis of the Supreme Court's role in the struggle for racial equality, focusing on the Court's decisions on discrimination by public bodies, discrimination by private organizations, and minority preferences. Judges, lawyers, students, and general readers will learn a great deal from this book." - Judge Jon O. Newman, Senior Judge, United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit

Out of Order

Stories from the History of the Supreme Court

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Author: Sandra Day O'Connor

Publisher: Random House Incorporated

ISBN: 0812993926

Category: Law

Page: 233

View: 9476

The former Supreme Court justice shares stories about the history and evolution of the Supreme Court that traces the roles of key contributors while sharing the events behind important transformations.

Reinventing Juvenile Justice

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Author: Barry Krisberg,James F. Austin,James Austin

Publisher: SAGE

ISBN: 9780803948297

Category: Social Science

Page: 212

View: 5898

A painful view of the current state of juvenile justice in the United States is presented in this volume which asks whether the 'children's court' has outlived its usefulness. As pressure builds to handle more children in adult courts and to consign them to adult prisons, the authors explore alternatives to the custodial treatment of juveniles and suggest how the juvenile justice system can, and should, be reformed.

The Court and the World

American Law and the New Global Realities

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Author: Stephen Breyer

Publisher: Vintage

ISBN: 1101912073

Category: Law

Page: 400

View: 8079

"In this original, far-reaching, and timely book, Justice Stephen Breyer examines the work of the Supreme Court of the United States in an increasingly interconnected world, a world in which all sorts of activity, both public and private--from the conduct of national security policy to the conduct of international trade--obliges the Court to understand and consider circumstances beyond America's borders. It is a world of instant communications, lightning-fast commerce, and shared problems (like public health threats and environmental degradation), and it is one in which the lives of Americans are routinely linked ever more pervasively to those of people in foreign lands. Indeed, at a moment when anyone may engage in direct transactions internationally for services previously bought and sold only locally (lodging, for instance, through online sites), it has become clear that, even in ordinary matters, judicial awareness can no longer stop at the water's edge. To trace how foreign considerations have come to inform the thinking of the Court, Justice Breyer begins with that area of the law in which they have always figured prominently: national security in its constitutional dimension--how should the Court balance this imperative with others, chiefly the protection of basic liberties, in its review of presidential and congressional actions? He goes on to show that as the world has grown steadily "smaller," the Court's horizons have inevitably expanded: it has been obliged to consider a great many more matters that now cross borders. What is the geographical reach of an American statute concerning, say, securities fraud, antitrust violations, or copyright protections? And in deciding such matters, can the Court interpret American laws so that they might work more efficiently with similar laws in other nations? While Americans must necessarily determine their own laws through democratic process, increasingly, the smooth operation of American law--and, by extension, the advancement of American interests and values--depends on its working in harmony with that of other jurisdictions. Justice Breyer describes how the aim of cultivating such harmony, as well as the expansion of the rule of law overall, with its attendant benefits, has drawn American jurists into the relatively new role of "constitutional diplomats," a little remarked but increasingly important job for them in this fast-changing world."--Publisher's description.