Dubuque's Forgotten Cemetery

Excavating a Nineteenth-Century Burial Ground in a Twenty-first Century City

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Author: Robin M. Lillie,Jennifer E. Mack

Publisher: University of Iowa Press

ISBN: 1609383222

Category: History

Page: 256

View: 1972

Atop a scenic bluff overlooking the Mississippi River and downtown Dubuque there once lay a graveyard dating to the 1830s, the earliest days of American settlement in Iowa. Though many local residents knew the property had once been a Catholic burial ground, they believed the graves had been moved to a new cemetery in the late nineteenth century in response to overcrowding and changing burial customs. But in 2007, when a developer broke ground for a new condominium complex here, the heavy machinery unearthed human bones. Clearly, some of Dubuque’s early settlers still rested there—in fact, more than anyone expected. For the next four years, staff with the Burials Program of the University of Iowa Office of the State Archaeologist excavated the site so that development could proceed. The excavation fieldwork was just the beginning. Once the digging was done each summer, skeletal biologist Robin M. Lillie and archaeologist Jennifer E. Mack still faced the enormous task of teasing out life histories from fragile bones, disintegrating artifacts, and the decaying wooden coffins the families had chosen for the deceased. Poring over scant documents and sifting through old newspapers, they pieced together the story of the cemetery and its residents, a story often surprising and poignant. Weaving together science, history, and local mythology, the tale of the Third Street Cemetery provides a fascinating glimpse into Dubuque’s early years, the hardships its settlers endured, and the difficulties they did not survive. While they worked, Lillie and Mack also grappled with the legal and ethical obligations of the living to the dead. These issues are increasingly urgent as more and more of America’s unmarked (and marked) cemeteries are removed in the name of progress. Fans of forensic crime shows and novels will find here a real-world example of what can be learned from the fragments left in time’s wake.

Woman Suffrage and Citizenship in the Midwest, 1870-1920

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Author: Sara Egge

Publisher: University of Iowa Press

ISBN: 1609385578

Category: History

Page: 248

View: 3045

Historian Sara Egge offers critical insights into the woman suffrage movement by exploring how it emerged in small Midwestern communities—in Clay County, Iowa; Lyon County, Minnesota; and Yankton County, South Dakota. Examining this grassroots activism offers a new approach that uncovers the sophisticated ways Midwestern suffragists understood citizenship as obligation. These suffragists, mostly Yankees who migrated from the Northeast after the Civil War, participated enthusiastically in settling the region and developing communal institutions such as libraries, schools, churches, and parks. Meanwhile, as Egge’s detailed local study also shows, the efforts of the National American Women’s Suffrage Association did not always succeed in promoting the movement’s goals. Instead, it gained support among Midwesterners only when local rural women claimed the right to vote on the basis of their well-established civic roles and public service. By investigating civic responsibility, Egge reorients scholarship on woman suffrage and brings attention to the Midwest, a region overlooked by most historians of the movement. In doing so, she sheds new light onto the ways suffragists rejuvenated the cause in the twentieth century.

Harvest of Hazards

Family Farming, Accidents, and Expertise in the Corn Belt, 1940-1975

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Author: Derek S. Oden

Publisher: University of Iowa Press

ISBN: 1609384997

Category: Political Science

Page: 292

View: 9279

Farming has always been a dangerous occupation. In the middle of the twentieth century, as farmers adopted a wide array of new technologies, from tractors to pesticides and fertilizers, the dangers became more acute. The economic pressures that agriculture faced in this period compounded the perils of these powerful new tools, as farmers struggled to stay profitable in the face of widespread consolidation. In this study of the farm safety movement in the Corn Belt, historian Derek Oden examines why agriculture was so dangerous and why improvements were so difficult to achieve. Because farmers were self-employed business owners whose employees were mainly family members; because they lived far from aid such as hospitals and fire stations; and because they had to manage such a diverse array of new technologies, they could not easily adopt the workplace safety and public health reforms designed for factories and urban settings. In response, beginning in the 1940s, farmers and a new breed of farm safety specialists relied upon an increasingly elaborate educational campaign to lessen injuries and illnesses on the farm. Several government, business, and nonprofit organizations—from the US Department of Agriculture to the National Safety Council and 4-H and the Future Farmers of America—worked together to publicize both the dangers of farming and the information farmers needed to stay safe while driving tractors, applying anhydrous ammonia, or repairing machinery. By the 1960s, however, the partnership began to break down, and by the 1970s the safety movement became increasingly contested as professional and policy divisions emerged. This groundbreaking study incorporates agriculture into the histories of occupational safety and public health.

The Skeleton Crew

How Amateur Sleuths Are Solving America’s Coldest Cases

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Author: Deborah Halber

Publisher: Simon and Schuster

ISBN: 1451657595

Category: Computers

Page: 304

View: 5377

Citing tens of thousands of missing persons, unidentified remains, and unsolved crimes in America, an introduction to amateur crime solving reveals how everyday concerned citizens can access online resources to help solve cold cases.

The Great Medicine Road

Narratives of the Oregon, California, and Mormon Trails, 1840-1848

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Author: Will Bagley,Richard Rieck

Publisher: Arthur H. Clark Company

ISBN: 9780870624285

Category: History

Page: 344

View: 8324

Between 1841 and 1866, more than 500,000 people followed trails to Oregon, California, and the Salt Lake Valley in one of the greatest mass migrations in American history. This collection of travelers' accounts of their journeys in the 1840s, the first volume in a new series of trail narratives, comprises excerpts from pioneer and missionary letters, diaries, journals, and memoirs--many previously unpublished--accompanied by biographical information and historical background. Beginning with Father Pierre-Jean de Smet's letters relating his encounters with Plains Indians, and ending with an account of a Mormon gold miner's journey from California to Salt Lake City, these narratives tell varied and vivid stories. Some travelers fled hard times: religious persecution, the collapse of the agricultural economy, illness, or unpredictable weather. Others looked ahead, attracted by California gold, the verdant Willamette Valley of Oregon, or the prospect of converting Native people to Christianity. Although many welcomed the adventure and adjusted to the rigors of trail life, others complained in their accounts of difficulty adapting. Remembrances of the Oregon, California, and Mormon Trails have yielded some of the most iconic images in American history. This and forthcoming volumes in The Great Medicine Road series present the pioneer spirit of the original overlanders supported by the rich scholarship of the past century and a half.

Methland

The Death and Life of an American Small Town

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Author: Nick Reding

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing USA

ISBN: 1608192075

Category: Psychology

Page: 269

View: 1968

Traces the efforts of a small Iowa community to counter the pervasiveness of crystal methamphetamine, in an account that offers insight into the drug's appeal while chronicling the author's numerous visits with the town's doctor, the local prosecutor and a long-time addict. Reprint. A best-selling book.

The American Resting Place

400 Years of History Through Our Cemeteries and Burial Grounds

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Author: Marilyn Yalom

Publisher: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt

ISBN: 9780547345437

Category: History

Page: 352

View: 3890

A sweeping history of America as seen through its gravestones, graveyards, and burial practices, stunningly illustrated with eighty black-and-white photographs Cemeteries and burial grounds, as illuminated by an acclaimed cultural historian, are unique windows onto our religious, ethnic, and deeply human history as Americans. The dedicated mother-son team of Marilyn and Reid Yalom visited hundreds of cemeteries to create The American Resting Place, following a coast-to-coast trajectory that mirrors the vast historical pattern of American migration. Yalom’s incisive, often poignant exploration of gravestone inscriptions reveal changing ideas about death and personal identity, and demonstrate how class and gender play out in stone. Rich particulars include the story of one seventeenth-century Bostonian who amassed a thousand pairs of gloves in his funeral-going lifetime, the unique burial rites and funerary symbols found in today’s Native American cultures, and a “lost” Czech community brought uncannily to life in Chicago’s Bohemian National Columbarium. From fascinating past to startling future--DVDs embedded in tombstones, "green" burials, and “the new aesthetic of death”--The American Resting Place is the definitive history of the American cemetery.

In Search of Susanna

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Author: Suzanne L. Bunkers

Publisher: University of Iowa Press

ISBN: 9781587290268

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 251

View: 935

The Plains Across

The Overland Emigrants and the Trans-Mississippi West, 1840-60

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Author: John D. Unruh

Publisher: University of Illinois Press

ISBN: 9780252063602

Category: History

Page: 592

View: 7454

The most honored book ever released by the University of Illinois Press, The Plains Across was the result of more than a decade's work by its author. Here, on the occasion of the 150th anniversary of the opening of the Oregon Trail, is a paperback reissue that includes the notes, bibliography, and illustrations contained in the 1979 cloth edition.

Twelve Millennia

Archaeology of the Upper Mississippi River Valley

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Author: James L Theler,Robert F Boszhardt

Publisher: University of Iowa Press

ISBN: 1587294397

Category: History

Page: 254

View: 6741

The people of Taquile Island on the Peruvian side of beautiful Lake Titicaca, the highest navigable lake in the Americas, are renowned for the hand-woven textiles that they both wear and sell to outsiders. One thousand seven hundred Quechua-speaking peasant farmers, who depend on potatoes and the fish from the lake, host the forty thousand tourists who visit their island each year. Yet only twenty-five years ago, few tourists had even heard of Taquile. In Weaving a Future: Tourism, Cloth, and Culture on an Andean Island, Elayne Zorn documents the remarkable transformation of the isolated rocky island into a community-controlled enterprise that now provides a model for indigenous communities worldwide. Over the course of three decades and nearly two years living on Taquile Island, Zorn, who is trained in both the arts and anthropology, learned to weave from Taquilean women. She also learned how gender structures both the traditional lifestyles and the changes that tourism and transnationalism have brought. In her comprehensive and accessible study, she reveals how Taquileans used their isolation, landownership, and communal organizations to negotiate the pitfalls of globalization and modernization and even to benefit from tourism. This multi-sited ethnography set in Peru, Washington, D.C., and New York City shows why and how cloth remains central to Andean society and how the marketing of textiles provided the experience and money for Taquilean initiatives in controlling tourism. The first book about tourism in South America that centers on traditional arts as well as community control, Weaving a Future will be of great interest to anthropologists and scholars and practitioners of tourism, grassroots development, and the fiber arts.

The Cosmopolitan Lyceum

Lecture Culture and the Globe in Nineteenth-century America

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Author: Tom F. Wright

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781625340597

Category: Education

Page: 250

View: 1749

From the 1830s to the 1900s, a circuit of lecture halls known as the "lyceum movement" flourished across the United States. At its peak, up to a million people a week regularly attended talks in local venues, captivated by the words of visiting orators who spoke on an extensive range of topics. The movement was a major intellectual and cultural force of this nation-building period, forming the creative environment of writers and public figures such as Frederic Douglass, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Anna Dickinson, and Mark Twain. The phenomenon of the lyceum has commonly been characterized as inward looking and nationalistic. Yet as this collection of essays reveals, nineteenth-century audiences were fascinated by information from around the globe, and lecturers frequently spoke to their fellow Americans of their connection to the world beyond the nation and helped them understand "exotic" ways of life. Never simple in its engagement with cosmopolitan ideas, the lyceum provided a powerful public encounter with international currents and crosscurrents, foreshadowing the problems and paradoxes that continue to resonate in our globalized world. This book offers a major reassessment of this important cultural phenomenon, bringing together diverse scholars from history, rhetoric, and literary studies. The twelve essays use a range of approaches, cover a wide chronological timespan, and discuss a variety of performers both famous and obscure. In addition to the volume editor, contributors include Robert Arbour, Thomas Augst, Susan Branson, Virginia Garnett, Peter Gibian, Sara Lambert, Angela Ray, Evan Roberts, Paul Stob, Mary Zboray, and Ronald Zboray.

Nature's Palette

The Science of Plant Color

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Author: David Lee

Publisher: University of Chicago Press

ISBN: 0226471055

Category: Science

Page: 432

View: 3258

Though he didn’t realize it at the time, David Lee began this book twenty-five years ago as he was hiking in the mountains outside Kuala Lumpur. Surrounded by the wonders of the jungle, Lee found his attention drawn to one plant in particular, a species of fern whose electric blue leaves shimmered amidst the surrounding green. The evolutionary wonder of the fern’s extravagant beauty filled Lee with awe—and set him on a career-long journey to understand everything about plant colors. Nature’s Palette is the fully ripened fruit of that journey—a highly illustrated, immensely entertaining exploration of the science of plant color. Beginning with potent reminders of how deeply interwoven plant colors are with human life and culture—from the shifting hues that told early humans when fruits and vegetables were edible to the indigo dyes that signified royalty for later generations—Lee moves easily through details of pigments, the evolution of color perception, the nature of light, and dozens of other topics. Through a narrative peppered with anecdotes of a life spent pursuing botanical knowledge around the world, he reveals the profound ways that efforts to understand and exploit plant color have influenced every sphere of human life, from organic chemistry to Renaissance painting to the highly lucrative orchid trade. Lavishly illustrated and packed with remarkable details sure to delight gardeners and naturalists alike, Nature’s Palette will enchant anyone who’s ever wondered about red roses and blue violets—or green thumbs.

Slavery and the American West

The Eclipse of Manifest Destiny

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Author: Michael A. Morrison

Publisher: Univ of North Carolina Press

ISBN: 0807864323

Category: History

Page: 416

View: 7583

Tracing the sectionalization of American politics in the 1840s and 1850s, Michael Morrison offers a comprehensive study of how slavery and territorial expansion intersected as causes of the Civil War. Specifically, he argues that the common heritage of the American Revolution bound Americans together until disputes over the extension of slavery into the territories led northerners and southerners to increasingly divergent understandings of the Revolution's legacy. Manifest Destiny promised the literal enlargement of freedom through the extension of American institutions all the way to the Pacific. At each step--from John Tyler's attempt to annex Texas in 1844, to the Kansas-Nebraska Act, to the opening shots of the Civil War--the issue of slavery had to be confronted. Morrison shows that the Revolution was the common prism through which northerners and southerners viewed these events and that the factor that ultimately made consensus impossible was slavery itself. By 1861, no nationally accepted solution to the dilemma of slavery in the territories had emerged, no political party existed as a national entity, and politicians from both North and South had come to believe that those on the other side had subverted the American political tradition.

The Archaeological Guide to Iowa

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Author: William E. Whittaker,Lynn M. Alex,Mary De La Garza

Publisher: University of Iowa Press

ISBN: 1609383370

Category: History

Page: 271

View: 7882

Provides information on 68 important archaeological sites in Iowa, including sites of every type, from every time period, and in every part of the state.

Stories in Stone

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Author: Douglas Keister

Publisher: Gibbs Smith

ISBN: 1423611004

Category: Travel

Page: 256

View: 2398

Certain symbols abound in modern Western culture that are instantly recognizable: the cross signifies Christianity, the six-pointed Star of David is revered by Jews, the golden arches frequently means it's time for lunch. Other symbols, however, require a bit of decoding-particularly those found in cemeteries. Cemeteries are virtual encyclopedias of symbolism. Engravings on tombstones, mausoleums and memorials tell us just about everything there is to know about a person- date of birth and death as well as religion, ethnicity, occupation, community interests, and much more. In the fascinating new book Stories in Stone: The Complete Guide to Cemetery Symbolism by noted author Douglas Keister, the secrets of cemetery symbolism are finally revealed. For instance, did you know that it is quite rare to see a sunflower on a tombstone? Did you know that the human foot symbolizes humility and service since it consistently touches the earth? Or the humble sheaf of wheat-while it is often used to denote someone who has lived a long and fruitful life, do you know other meanings it might carry? Stories in Stone provides history along with images of a wide variety of common and not-so-common cemetery symbols, and offers an in-depth examination of stone relics and the personal and intimate details they display-flora and fauna, religious icons, society symbols, and final impressions of how the deceased wished to be remembered. Douglas Keister has created a practical field guide that is compact and portable, perfect for those interested in family histories and genealogical research, and is the only book of its kind that unlocks the language of symbols in a comprehensive and easy-to-understand manner. Douglas Keister has photographed fourteen award-winning, critically acclaimed books (including Red Tile Style: America's Spanish Revival Architecture, The Bungalow: America's Arts & Crafts Home, and Storybook Style: America's Whimsical Homes of the Twenties) earning him the title "America's most noted photographer of historic architecture." He also writes and illustrates magazine articles and contributes photographs and essays to other books, calendars, posters, and greeting cards. Doug lives in Chico, California, and travels frequently to photograph and lecture on historic architecture and photography.

Creativity for 21st Century Skills

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Author: Jane Piirto

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 9460914632

Category: Education

Page: 195

View: 2762

VERY practical, on target for schools today—good balance of theory with anecdotal connections.” “At first I was worried about the time involved. I discovered when given 5 minutes . . . the time is a continuation to their work in progress. Realizing that creativity does not have to consume large chunks of time is more meaningful than tokens.” “I like the tone of the writing. It feels like there is a conversation going on.” “I like the stories of famous people and how their creativity influenced and changed their lives.” CREATIVITY FOR 21ST CENTURY SKILLS describes what many creative people really do when they create. It focuses on the practical applications of a theoretical approach to creativity training the author has developed. Many suggestions for enhancing creativity focus on ideas that are over 60 years old. This new approach may be helpful for those seeking to develop 21st Century Skills of creativity. Five core attitudes (Naiveté, Risk-taking, Self-Discipline, Tolerance for Ambiguity, and Group Trust), Seven I’s (Inspiration, Intuition, Improvisation, Imagination, Imagery, Incubation, and Insight), and several General Practices—the use of ritual, meditation, solitude, exercise, silence, and a creative attitude to the process of life, with corresponding activities, are described, discussed, and illustrated. A discussion of how to be creative within an educational institution is also included. JANE PIIRTO is Trustees’ Distinguished Professor at Ashland University. Her doctorate is in educational leadership. She has worked with students pre-K to doctoral level as a teacher, administrator, and professor. She has published 11 books, both literary and scholarly, and many scholarly articles in peer-reviewed journals and anthologies, as well as several poetry and creative nonfiction chapbooks. She has won Individual Artist Fellowships from the Ohio Arts Council in both poetry and fiction and is one of the few American writers listed as both a poet and a writer in the Directory of American Poets and Writers. She is a recipient of the Mensa Lifetime Achievement Award, of an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters, was named an Ohio Magazine educator of distinction. In 2010 she was named Distinguished Scholar by the National Association for Gifted Children.

Exploring Buried Buxton

Archaeology of an Abandoned Iowa Coal Mining Town with a Large Black Population

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Author: David M. Gradwohl,Nancy M. Osborn

Publisher: University of Iowa Press

ISBN: 1587296659

Category: History

Page: 223

View: 3073

Few sources before have dealt with the archaeology of African American settlements outside the Atlantic seaboard and the southern states. This book describes in detail the archaeological investigations conducted at the town site of Buxton, Iowa, a coal mining community inhabited by a significantly large population of blacks between 1900 and 1925. David Gradwohl and Nancy Osborn present the archaeology of Buxton from “the group up” to articulate the material remains with the data acquired from archival studies and oral history interviews. They also examine the broader significance of the Buxton experience in terms of those who lived there and their children and grandchildren who have heard about Buxton all their lives.

Memory, Community and Activism

Mexican Migration and Labor in the Pacific Northwest

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Author: Jerry García,Gilberto García

Publisher: Michigan State University Press

ISBN: N.A

Category: History

Page: 335

View: 5083

Memory, Community, and Activismis the first book-length study to critically examine the Mexican experience in the U.S. Pacific Northwest. Many books deal with Chicano history, but few ever attempt to interpret or analyze it beyond the confines of the American Southwest. Eleven essays by leading scholars on the Mexican experience in the Northwest shed new light on immigration/migration, the Bracero program, the Catholic Church, race and race relations, Mexican culture, unionization, and Chicana feminism. This collection analyzes the Mexican experience from the early twentieth century to the present.

Reflections on My Life

in the Kingdom and the Academy

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Author: Thomas H. Olbricht

Publisher: Wipf and Stock Publishers

ISBN: 1630876410

Category: Religion

Page: 470

View: 4687

Thomas H. Olbricht grew up in Churches of Christ, has taught in several of their universities, and has given religious lectures on six continents and in most states in the United States. He has met most leaders in Churches of Christ globally. He has been active in several religious and rhetoric societies and has worked with leaders in all these organizations to bring about changes over the past sixty years. C. Clifton Black and Duane F. Watson wrote about Olbricht, "Tom Olbricht possesses a memory of elephantine proportions. Not only does he have at his fingertips the names and places and dates; better than most he understands how the study of rhetoric has flourished among, while cross-pollinating, multiple disciplines in the humanities, classics, English, speech communication, and religion."

The Material Culture of Steamboat Passengers

Archaeological Evidence from the Missouri River

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Author: Annalies Corbin

Publisher: Springer Science & Business Media

ISBN: 0306461684

Category: History

Page: 237

View: 8353

This book is a material culture analysis of passengers' belongings found on the steamboats Bertrand and Arabia, which served nineteenth century emigrants traveling west on the Missouri river. The research utilizes documentary sources, photographs, and archaeological artifacts. The book is heavily descriptive and will be regarded as a reference manual for western artifacts and for steamboats that operated on the Missouri river.