Dangerous Voices

Women's Laments and Greek Literature

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Author: Gail Holst-Warhaft

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1134908083

Category: History

Page: 240

View: 7837

In Dangerous Voices Holst-Warhaft investigates the power and meaning of the ancient lament, especially women's mourning of the dead, and sets out to discover why legislation was introduced to curb these laments in antiquity. An investigation of laments ranging from New Guinea to Greece suggests that this essentially female art form gave women considerable power over the rituals of death. The threat they posed to the Greek state caused them to be appropriated by male writers including the tragedians. Holst-Warhaft argues that the loss of the traditional lament in Greece and other countries not only deprives women of their traditional control over the rituals of death but leaves all mourners impoverished.

The Fall of Athens

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Author: Gail Holst-Warhaft

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781942515401

Category:

Page: 308

View: 2251

The Fall of Athens reflects the bleak state of present-day Athens and reminds the reader that there is nothing new about Greece's suffering. Combining present observations with portraits of the Greek musicians and writers, Holst-Warhaft's book is both a peon of praise for the music and poetry that the author first discovered in the Greece of the 1960's, and a reminder of how much the country has changed since it returned to democracy in 1974. Having played in the orchestras of such legends as Mikis Theodorakis and Dionysis Savvopoulos, the author had a bird's eye view of 20th century Greek music at its apogee. Translating Greek poetry and prose later brought her in close contact with some of the leading writers of the period. With the discovery of Greek music and poetry came the forging of lasting friendships with these giants of Greek culture. This eclectic compilation of poetry, prose, translation, memoir, and songs captures the enigmatic, hybrid nature of Greece, a country that has always had the ability to create extraordinary beauty out of suffering.

Girls and Women in Classical Greek Religion

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Author: Matthew Dillon

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 113436508X

Category: History

Page: 448

View: 1238

It has often been thought that participation in fertility rituals was women's most important religious activity in classical Greece. Matthew Dillon's wide-ranging study makes it clear that women engaged in numerous other rites and cults, and that their role in Greek religion was actually more important than that of men. Women invoked the gods' help in becoming pregnant, venerated the god of wine, worshipped new and exotic deities, used magic for both erotic and pain-relieving purposes, and far more besides. Clear and comprehensive, this volume challenges many stereotypes of Greek women and offers unexpected insights into their experience of religion. With more than fifty illustrations, and translated extracts from contemporary texts, this is an essential resource for the study of women and religion in classical Greece.

Making Silence Speak

Women's Voices in Greek Literature and Society

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Author: André Lardinois,Laura McClure

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 0691187592

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: N.A

View: 1309

This collection attempts to recover the voices of women in antiquity from a variety of perspectives: how they spoke, where they could be heard, and how their speech was adopted in literature and public discourse. Rather than confirming the old model of binary oppositions in which women's speech was viewed as insignificant and subordinate to male discourse, these essays reveal a dynamic and potentially explosive interrelation between women's speech and the realm of literary production, religion, and oratory. The contributors use a variety of methodologies to mine a diverse array of sources, from Homeric epic to fictional letters of the second sophistic period and from actual letters written by women in Hellenistic Egypt to the poetry of Sappho. Throughout, the term "voice" is used in its broadest definition. It includes not only the few remaining genuine women's voices but also the ways in which male authors render women's speech and the social assumptions such representations reflect and reinforce. These essays therefore explore how fictional female voices can serve to negotiate complex social, epistemological, and aesthetic issues. The contributors include Josine Blok, Raffaella Cribiore, Michael Gagarin, Mark Griffith, André Lardinois, Richard Martin, Lisa Maurizio, Laura McClure, D. M. O'Higgins, Patricia Rosenmeyer, Marilyn Skinner, Eva Stehle, and Nancy Worman.

The Cue for Passion

Grief and Its Political Uses

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Author: Gail Holst-Warhaft

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 9780674002241

Category: Family & Relationships

Page: 228

View: 9278

Having set aside age-old ways of mourning, how do people in the modern world cope with tragic loss? Using traditional mourning rituals as an instructive touchstone, Gail Holst-Warhaft explores the ways sorrow is managed in our own times and how mourning can be manipulated for social and political ends. Since ancient times political and religious authorities have been alert to the dangerously powerful effects of communal expressions of grief--while valuing mourning rites as a controlled outlet for emotion. But today grief is often seen as a psychological problem: the bereaved are encouraged to seek counseling or take antidepressants. At the same time, we have witnessed some striking examples of manipulation of shared grief for political effect. One instance is the unprecedented concentration on recovery of the remains of Americans killed in the Vietnam War. In Buenos Aires the Mothers of the Disappeared forged the passion of their grief into a political weapon. Similarly the gay community in the United States, transformed by grief and rage, not only lobbied effectively for AIDS victims but channeled their emotions into fresh artistic expression. It might be argued that, in contrast to earlier cultures, modern society has largely abdicated its role in managing sorrow. But in The Cue for Passion we see that some communities, moved by the intensity of their grief, have utilized it to gain ground for their own agendas.

Aeschylus, 2

The Persians, Seven Against Thebes, The Suppliants, Prometheus Bound

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Author: Aeschylus

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 9780812216714

Category: Drama

Page: 232

View: 5946

"A boon for classicists and general readers alike. For the reader who comes to tragedy for the first time, these translations are eminently 'accessible,' and consummately American in tone and feeling. For the classicist, these versions constitute an ambitious reinterpretation of traditional masterpieces; after 2,500 years, the poetry of Euripides and Aeschylus has found a new voice—in fact, ten of them."—The Boston Book Review

Rites of Passage in Ancient Greece

Literature, Religion, Society

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Author: Mark William Padilla

Publisher: Bucknell University Press

ISBN: 9780838754184

Category: History

Page: 312

View: 1158

The twelve essays in this volume of Bucknell Review treat the topic of rites of passage in ancient Greece, focusing largely on Athenian tragedy, but also Plato, the Greek novel, the festival of Anthesteria, and other topics.

Intimate Commerce

Exchange, Gender, and Subjectivity in Greek Tragedy

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Author: Victoria Wohl

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 0292774052

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 332

View: 4838

Exchanges of women between men occur regularly in Greek tragedy—and almost always with catastrophic results. Instead of cementing bonds between men, such exchanges rend them. They allow women, who should be silent objects, to become monstrous subjects, while men often end up as lifeless corpses. But why do the tragedies always represent the transferal of women as disastrous? Victoria Wohl offers an illuminating analysis of the exchange of women in Sophocles' Trachiniae, Aeschylus' Agamemnon, and Euripides' Alcestis. She shows how the attempts of women in these plays to become active subjects rather than passive objects of exchange inevitably fail. While these failures seem to validate male hegemony, the women's actions, however futile, blur the distinction between male subject and female object, calling into question the very nature of the tragic self. What the tragedies thus present, Wohl asserts, is not only an affirmation of Athens' reigning ideologies (including its gender hierarchy) but also the possibility of resistance to them and the imagination of alternatives.

Voices at Work

Women, Performance, and Labor in Ancient Greece

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Author: Andromache Karanika

Publisher: JHU Press

ISBN: 142141256X

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 320

View: 9474

In ancient Greece, women's daily lives were occupied by various forms of labor. These experiences of work have largely been forgotten. Andromache Karanika has examined Greek poetry for depictions of women working and has discovered evidence of their lamentations and work songs. Voices at Work explores the complex relationships between ancient Greek poetry, the female poetic voice, and the practices and rituals surrounding women’s labor in the ancient world. The poetic voice is closely tied to women’s domestic and agricultural labor. Weaving, for example, was both a common form of female labor and a practice referred to for understanding the craft of poetry. Textile and agricultural production involved storytelling, singing, and poetry. Everyday labor employed—beyond its socioeconomic function—the power of poetic creation. Karanika starts with the assumption that there are certain forms of poetic expression and performance in the ancient world which are distinctively female. She considers these to be markers of a female "voice" in ancient Greek poetry and presents a number of case studies: Calypso and Circe sing while they weave; in Odyssey 6 a washing scene captures female performances. Both of these instances are examples of the female voice filtered into the fabric of the epic. Karanika brings to the surface the words of women who informed the oral tradition from which Greek epic poetry emerged. In other words, she gives a voice to silence. -- Laura Kathleen McClure, University of Wisconsin

Voice and Voicelessness in Medieval Europe

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Author: Irit Ruth Kleiman

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 1137397063

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 264

View: 8747

Twelve medieval scholars from a wide range of disciplines, including law, literature, and religion address the question: What did it mean to possess a voice - or to be without one - during the Middle Ages? This collection reveals how the philosophy, theology, and aesthetics of the voice inhabit some of the most canonical texts of the Middle Ages.

Desert Voices

Bedouin Women's Poetry in Saudi Arabia

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Author: Moneera Al-Ghadeer

Publisher: I.B.Tauris

ISBN: 0857711962

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 288

View: 1924

The Bedouin, or ‘desert dwellers’, have a rich cultural heritage often expressed through music and poetry. Here Moneera Al-Ghadeer provides us with the first comparative reading of women’s oral poetry from Saudi Arabia. She examines women’s lyrics of love, desire, mourning and grievance. We come to understand Bedouin mores and - most significantly - the unique description of a desert that is consistently held to be infinite, evocative, stimulating and an eternal freedom. _x000D_ ‘Desert Voices’ asks a number of questions: How should we read oral poetry? Should our approach differ from the analytical models of canonical Arabic poetry? What theoretical insights may be gained from comparative reflection on an excluded feminine oral genre? Can Bedouin women’s oral poems be read with contemporary literary theory/al-nazariya adabiya/pensée?_x000D_ Moneera Al-Ghadeer addresses these questions by translating, analyzing and critically reflecting on the oral poetry material originally collected by Ibn Raddas. She explores different elegies and the rhetoric of mourning and melancholy with particular emphasis on the insights of Sigmund Freud and Judith Butler. The changing face of the Arabian peninsula is documented in Bedouin women’s poetry, through poems composed after the discovery of oil, in which women speak of technology in the form of automobiles, railways, aeroplanes and binoculars. These poems illuminate an important and neglected historical moment that is relevant to certain postcolonial and globalization theories about current crises in the Middle East. _x000D_ Al-Ghadeer faces the problems of translation of oral poetry. What happens to the marginal subject and the minor language - dialect/s - in translation? How can one translate oral poems composed in a nomadic dialect? She uses translation theory as presented by Walter Benjamin, de Man, Derrida and G. C. Spivak and tackles the most obvious translation problem in these poems: the exceedingly rich vocabulary of Bedouin ethos and the multifaceted signification of weather and animal imagery._x000D_ As the first English translation and analysis of this poetry, ‘Desert Voices’ is both a gesture to preserving the oral poetic tradition of women and a radical critique addressing the exclusion of their poetry from current academic literary studies. The book provides invaluable material for reflection in the debates around oral culture and women’s poetic composition while it translates, presents and critically examins a genre, which opens Arabic poetry and literature to contemporary theory and criticism.

Mourning Rituals in Archaic & Classical Greece and Pre-Qin China

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Author: Xiaoqun Wu

Publisher: Springer

ISBN: 981130632X

Category: Religion

Page: 106

View: 6638

This pivot compares mourning rituals in Archaic & Classical Greece and Pre-Qin China to illustrate some of the principles and methods used in comparative studies. It focuses on three main aspects of mourning of the dead before burial — lamentation, mourners’ gestures and behaviors, and mourning apparel — to demonstrate the cultural function, purpose, and social influence of mourning. A key comparative study of rituals at the heart of both Western and Chinese culture, this text highlights the cultural function and social influence of rituals of two ancient peoples and will be of interest to all scholars of comparative religion, sociology and anthropology.

The Mourning Voice

An Essay on Greek Tragedy

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Author: Nicole Loraux

Publisher: Cornell University Press

ISBN: 9780801438301

Category: Drama

Page: 127

View: 2565

Loraux presents a radical challenge to what has become the dominant view of tragedy in recent years: that tragedy is primarily a civic phenomenon.

Spoken Like a Woman

Speech and Gender in Athenian Drama

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Author: Laura McClure

Publisher: Princeton University Press

ISBN: 0691144419

Category: Drama

Page: 336

View: 648

In ancient Athens, where freedom of speech derived from the power of male citizenship, women's voices were seldom heard in public. Female speech was more often represented in theatrical productions through women characters written and enacted by men. In Spoken Like a Woman, the first book-length study of women's speech in classical drama, Laura McClure explores the discursive practices attributed to women of fifth-century b.c. Greece and to what extent these representations reflected a larger reality. Examining tragedies and comedies by a variety of authors, she illustrates how the dramatic poets exploited speech conventions among both women and men to construct characters and to convey urgent social and political issues. From gossip to seductive persuasion, women's verbal strategies in the theater potentially subverted social and political hierarchy, McClure argues, whether the women characters were overtly or covertly duplicitous, in pursuit of adultery, or imitating male orators. Such characterization helped justify the regulation of women's speech in the democratic polis. The fact that women's verbal strategies were also used to portray male transvestites and manipulators, however, suggests that a greater threat of subversion lay among the spectators' own ranks, among men of uncertain birth and unscrupulous intent, such as demagogues skilled in the art of persuasion. Traditionally viewed as outsiders with ambiguous loyalties, deceitful and tireless in their pursuit of eros, women provided the dramatic poets with a vehicle for illustrating the dangerous consequences of political power placed in the wrong hands.

A Companion to Sophocles

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Author: Kirk Ormand

Publisher: John Wiley & Sons

ISBN: 1444356895

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 640

View: 4684

A Companion to Sophocles presents the first comprehensive collection of essays in decades to address all aspects of the life, works, and critical reception of Sophocles. First collection of its kind to provide introductory essays to the fragments of his lost plays and to the remaining fragments of one satyr-play, the Ichneutae, in addition to each of his extant tragedies Features new essays on Sophoclean drama that go well beyond the current state of scholarship on Sophocles Presents readings that historicize Sophocles in relation to the social, cultural, and intellectual world of fifth century Athens Seeks to place later interpretations and adaptations of Sophocles in their historical context Includes essays dedicated to issues of gender and sexuality; significant moments in the history of interpreting Sophocles; and reception of Sophocles by both ancient and modern playwrights

The Silence of the Girls

A Novel

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Author: Pat Barker

Publisher: Doubleday

ISBN: 0385544227

Category: Fiction

Page: 304

View: 3825

From the Booker Prize-winning author of the Regeneration trilogy comes a monumental new masterpiece, set in the midst of literature's most famous war. Pat Barker turns her attention to the timeless legend of The Iliad, as experienced by the captured women living in the Greek camp in the final weeks of the Trojan War. The ancient city of Troy has withstood a decade under siege of the powerful Greek army, who continue to wage bloody war over a stolen woman--Helen. In the Greek camp, another woman watches and waits for the war's outcome: Briseis. She was queen of one of Troy's neighboring kingdoms, until Achilles, Greece's greatest warrior, sacked her city and murdered her husband and brothers. Briseis becomes Achilles's concubine, a prize of battle, and must adjust quickly in order to survive a radically different life, as one of the many conquered women who serve the Greek army. When Agamemnon, the brutal political leader of the Greek forces, demands Briseis for himself, she finds herself caught between the two most powerful of the Greeks. Achilles refuses to fight in protest, and the Greeks begin to lose ground to their Trojan opponents. Keenly observant and cooly unflinching about the daily horrors of war, Briseis finds herself in an unprecedented position to observe the two men driving the Greek forces in what will become their final confrontation, deciding the fate, not only of Briseis's people, but also of the ancient world at large. Briseis is just one among thousands of women living behind the scenes in this war--the slaves and prostitutes, the nurses, the women who lay out the dead--all of them erased by history. With breathtaking historical detail and luminous prose, Pat Barker brings the teeming world of the Greek camp to vivid life. She offers nuanced, complex portraits of characters and stories familiar from mythology, which, seen from Briseis's perspective, are rife with newfound revelations. Barker's latest builds on her decades-long study of war and its impact on individual lives--and it is nothing short of magnificent.

Woman's Songs in Ancient Greece

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Author: Anne L. Klinck

Publisher: McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP

ISBN: 0773534482

Category: Poetry

Page: 285

View: 9930

Through a balanced discussion of poetry as performance, relevant kinds and genres of poetry, the definition and scope of "woman's song" as a mode, partheneia (maidens' songs) and the girls' chorus, lyric in the drama, echoes and imitations of archaic woman's song in Hellenistic poetry, and inferences about the differences between male and female authors, Klinck demonstrates that woman's song is ultimately best understood as the product of a male-dominated culture but that feminine stereotypes, while refined by skilful male poets, are interrogated and shifted by female poets.

Leaving words to remember [electronic resource]

Greek mourning and the advent of literacy

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Author: Katharine Derderian

Publisher: BRILL

ISBN: 9789004117501

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 206

View: 7779

This volume examines the influence of literacy on the development of mourning in ancient Greece. Considered against the oral tradition of Homeric lament, archaic and classical memorials are shown to evolve into an increasingly civic and historical medium of memory.

Middlesex

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Author: Jeffrey Eugenides

Publisher: Vintage Canada

ISBN: 0307401944

Category: Fiction

Page: 544

View: 1380

Spanning eight decades and chronicling the wild ride of a Greek-American family through the vicissitudes of the twentieth century, Jeffrey Eugenides’ witty, exuberant novel on one level tells a traditional story about three generations of a fantastic, absurd, lovable immigrant family -- blessed and cursed with generous doses of tragedy and high comedy. But there’s a provocative twist. Cal, the narrator -- also Callie -- is a hermaphrodite. And the explanation for this takes us spooling back in time, through a breathtaking review of the twentieth century, to 1922, when the Turks sacked Smyrna and Callie’s grandparents fled for their lives. Back to a tiny village in Asia Minor where two lovers, and one rare genetic mutation, set our narrator’s life in motion. Middlesex is a grand, utterly original fable of crossed bloodlines, the intricacies of gender, and the deep, untidy promptings of desire. It’s a brilliant exploration of divided people, divided families, divided cities and nations -- the connected halves that make up ourselves and our world. Justly acclaimed when it was released in Fall 2002, it announces the arrival of a major writer for our times. From the Hardcover edition.

A Book of Women Poets from Antiquity to Now

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Author: Aliki Barnstone,Willis Barnstone

Publisher: Schocken

ISBN: N.A

Category: Poetry

Page: 822

View: 7184

Anthologizes verses by women ranging from Enheduanna, a second millennium B.C. Sumerian princess, to the medieval poets Marie de France and Florencia de Pinar, to noteworthy poets of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries