Crossing Borders

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Author: Rigoberta Menchú

Publisher: Verso Books

ISBN: N.A

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 242

View: 9567

Details the life of the Nobel Peace Prize winner, her flight from Guatemala to Mexico in 1981, and her resolve to dedicate her life to Indian causes

Crossing the Borders of Time

A True Story of War, Exile, and Love Reclaimed

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Author: Leslie Maitland

Publisher: Other Press, LLC

ISBN: 1590514971

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 512

View: 3026

On a pier in Marseille in 1942, with desperate refugees pressing to board one of the last ships to escape France before the Nazis choked off its ports, an 18-year-old German Jewish girl was pried from the arms of the Catholic Frenchman she loved and promised to marry. As the Lipari carried Janine and her family to Casablanca on the first leg of a perilous journey to safety in Cuba, she would read through her tears the farewell letter that Roland had slipped in her pocket: “Whatever the length of our separation, our love will survive it, because it depends on us alone. I give you my vow that whatever the time we must wait, you will be my wife. Never forget, never doubt.” Five years later – her fierce desire to reunite with Roland first obstructed by war and then, in secret, by her father and brother – Janine would build a new life in New York with a dynamic American husband. That his obsession with Ayn Rand tormented their marriage was just one of the reasons she never ceased yearning to reclaim her lost love. Investigative reporter Leslie Maitland grew up enthralled by her mother’s accounts of forbidden romance and harrowing flight from the Nazis. Her book is both a journalist’s vivid depiction of a world at war and a daughter’s pursuit of a haunting question: what had become of the handsome Frenchman whose picture her mother continued to treasure almost fifty years after they parted? It is a tale of memory that reporting made real and a story of undying love that crosses the borders of time.

Crossing Borders

Personal Essays

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Author: Sergio Troncoso

Publisher: Arte Publico Press

ISBN: 9781558857100

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 201

View: 4793

This collection of personal essays by a Mexican-American writer deals with crossing linguistic, cultural, and intellectual borders to provoke debate about contemporary Mexican-American identity.

Crossing Borders

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Author: Dorothee Schneider

Publisher: Harvard University Press

ISBN: 0674061306

Category: History

Page: 331

View: 6561

Dorothee Schneider relates the story of immigrants’ passage from an old society to a new one, and American policymakers’ debates over admission to the United States and citizenship. Bringing together the histories of Europeans, Asians, and Mexicans, the book opens up a fresh view of immigrant expectations and government responses.

Crossing Borders

Modernity, Ideology, and Culture in Russia and the Soviet Union

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Author: Michael David-Fox

Publisher: University of Pittsburgh Press

ISBN: 0822980924

Category: History

Page: 336

View: 4656

Crossing Borders deconstructs contemporary theories of Soviet history from the revolution through the Stalin period, and offers new interpretations based on a transnational perspective. To Michael David-Fox, Soviet history was shaped by interactions across its borders. By reexamining conceptions of modernity, ideology, and cultural transformation, he challenges the polarizing camps of Soviet exceptionalism and shared modernity and instead strives for a theoretical and empirical middle ground as the basis for a creative and richly textured analysis. Discussions of Soviet modernity have tended to see the Soviet state either as an archaic holdover from the Russian past, or as merely another form of conventional modernity. David-Fox instead considers the Soviet Union in its own light—as a seismic shift from tsarist society that attracted influential visitors from the pacifist Left to the fascist Right. By reassembling Russian legacies, as he shows, the Soviet system evolved into a complex “intelligentsia-statist” form that introduced an array of novel agendas and practices, many embodied in the unique structures of the party-state. Crossing Borders demonstrates the need for a new interpretation of the Russian-Soviet historical trajectory—one that strikes a balance between the particular and the universal.

Crossing Borders, Claiming a Nation

A History of Argentine Jewish Women, 1880–1955

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Author: Sandra McGee Deutsch

Publisher: Duke University Press

ISBN: 0822392607

Category: History

Page: 395

View: 8846

In Crossing Borders, Claiming a Nation, Sandra McGee Deutsch brings to light the powerful presence and influence of Jewish women in Argentina. The country has the largest Jewish community in Latin America and the third largest in the Western Hemisphere as a result of large-scale migration of Jewish people from European and Mediterranean countries from the 1880s through the Second World War. During this period, Argentina experienced multiple waves of political and cultural change, including liberalism, nacionalismo, and Peronism. Although Argentine liberalism stressed universal secular education, immigration, and individual mobility and freedom, women were denied basic citizenship rights, and sometimes Jews were cast as outsiders, especially during the era of right-wing nacionalismo. Deutsch’s research fills a gap by revealing the ways that Argentine Jewish women negotiated their own plural identities and in the process participated in and contributed to Argentina’s liberal project to create a more just society. Drawing on extensive archival research and original oral histories, Deutsch tells the stories of individual women, relating their sentiments and experiences as both insiders and outsiders to state formation, transnationalism, and cultural, political, ethnic, and gender borders in Argentine history. As agricultural pioneers and film stars, human rights activists and teachers, mothers and doctors, Argentine Jewish women led wide-ranging and multifaceted lives. Their community involvement—including building libraries and secular schools, and opposing global fascism in the 1930s and 1940s—directly contributed to the cultural and political lifeblood of a changing Argentina. Despite their marginalization as members of an ethnic minority and as women, Argentine Jewish women formed communal bonds, carved out their own place in society, and ultimately shaped Argentina’s changing pluralistic culture through their creativity and work.

The Romance of Crossing Borders

Studying and Volunteering Abroad

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Author: Neriko Musha Doerr,Hannah Davis Taïeb

Publisher: Berghahn Books

ISBN: 1785333593

Category: Social Science

Page: 302

View: 559

What draws people to study abroad or volunteer in far-off communities? Often the answer is romance – the romance of landscapes, people, languages, the very sense of border-crossing – and longing for liberation, attraction to the unknown, yearning to make a difference. This volume explores the complicated and often fraught desires to study and volunteer abroad. In doing so, the book sheds light on how affect is managed by educators and mobilized by students and volunteers themselves, and how these structures of feeling relate to broader social and economic forces.

Crossing Borders

A Memoir

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Author: Kate Ferguson Ellis

Publisher: Gainesville, Fla. : University Press of Florida

ISBN: 9780813022840

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 243

View: 3079

One woman's journey across society's borders is chronicled here, retracing the life of Kate Ellis, and English professor who crosses the color line and eventually marries a black man.

Children Crossing Borders

Immigrant Parent and Teacher Perspectives on Preschool for Children of Immigrants

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Author: Joseph Tobin,Jennifer Keys Adair,Angela Arzubiaga

Publisher: Russell Sage Foundation

ISBN: 1610448073

Category: Social Science

Page: 164

View: 1726

In many school districts in America, the majority of students in preschools are children of recent immigrants. For both immigrant families and educators, the changing composition of preschool classes presents new and sometimes divisive questions about educational instruction, cultural norms and academic priorities. Drawing from an innovative study of preschools across the nation, Children Crossing Borders provides the first systematic comparison of the beliefs and perspectives of immigrant parents and the preschool teachers to whom they entrust their children. Children Crossing Borders presents valuable evidence from the U.S. portion of a landmark five-country study on the intersection of early education and immigration. The volume shows that immigrant parents and early childhood educators often have differing notions of what should happen in preschool. Most immigrant parents want preschool teachers to teach English, prepare their children academically, and help them adjust to life in the United States. Many said it was unrealistic to expect a preschool to play a major role in helping children retain their cultural and religious values. The authors examine the different ways that language and cultural differences prevent immigrant parents and school administrations from working together to achieve educational goals. For their part, many early education teachers who work with immigrant children find themselves caught between two core beliefs: on one hand, the desire to be culturally sensitive and responsive to parents, and on the other hand adhering to their core professional codes of best practice. While immigrant parents generally prefer traditional methods of academic instruction, many teachers use play-based curricula that give children opportunities to be creative and construct their own knowledge. Worryingly, most preschool teachers say they have received little to no training in working with immigrant children who are still learning English. For most young children of recent immigrants, preschools are the first and most profound context in which they confront the conflicts between their home culture and the United States. Policymakers and educators, however, are still struggling with how best to serve these children and their parents. Children Crossing Borders provides valuable research on these questions, and on the ways schools can effectively and sensitively incorporate new immigrants into the social fabric.

Crossing Borders

International Exchange and Planning Practices

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Author: Patsy Healey,Robert Upton

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1135154678

Category: Architecture

Page: 368

View: 6221

The complex diffusion processes affecting the flow of planning ideas and practices across the globe are illustrated in this book. It raises questions about why and how some ideas and practices attract international attention, and about the invention processes which go on when external influences are woven together with local efforts to meet local specifics and requirements. Initiated to celebrate the tenth anniversary of the journal Planning Theory and Practice in 2009, this book reflects the themes of the journal. Taking different intellectual perspectives, this collection takes a critical look at the international diffusion of planning ideas and practices, their impacts on planning practices in different contexts, on the challenge of ‘situating’ planning practices, and on the ethical and methodological issues of international exchange in the planning field.

Crossing Borders

International Studies for the 21st Century

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Author: Harry I. Chernotsky,Heidi H. Hobbs

Publisher: CQ Press

ISBN: 154430997X

Category: Political Science

Page: 368

View: 7053

Crossing Borders provides a framework built upon an understanding of the many borders that define the international system. Renowned authors Harry I. Chernotsky and Heidi H. Hobbs address many of the different fields that constitute international studies—geography, politics, economics, sociology, and anthropology—and give instructors a starting point from which they can pursue their own disciplinary interests. By integrating research and current examples, the Third Edition encourages you to identify your role in today’s international arena and what it means to be a global citizen. Not only do you develop a better understanding of the world, you also receive advice on how to increase your own global engagement through study abroad, internships, and career options. This Third Edition is thoroughly updated to reflect recent events and trends, including cyberterrorism, the rise of ISIS, and other key issues. It offers new color maps and clear learning objectives for every chapter, giving students a solid understanding of the complexity of the issues facing the world today.

Crossing Borders

Love Between Women in Medieval French and Arabic Literatures

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Author: Sahar Amer

Publisher: University of Pennsylvania Press

ISBN: 0812201086

Category: Literary Criticism

Page: 264

View: 7200

Given Christianity's valuation of celibacy and its persistent association of sexuality with the Fall and of women with sin, Western medieval attitudes toward the erotic could not help but be vexed. In contrast, eroticism is explicitly celebrated in a large number of theological, scientific, and literary texts of the medieval Arab Islamicate tradition, where sexuality was positioned at the very heart of religious piety. In Crossing Borders, Sahar Amer turns to the rich body of Arabic sexological writings to focus, in particular, on their open attitude toward erotic love between women. By juxtaposing these Arabic texts with French works, she reveals a medieval French literary discourse on same-sex desire and sexual practices that has gone all but unnoticed. The Arabic tradition on eroticism breaks through into French literary writings on gender and sexuality in often surprising ways, she argues, and she demonstrates how strategies of gender representation deployed in Arabic texts came to be models to imitate, contest, subvert, and at times censor in the West. Amer's analysis reveals Western literary representations of gender in the Middle Ages as cross-cultural, hybrid discourses as she reexamines borders—cultural, linguistic, historical, geographic—not as elements of separation and division but as fluid spaces of cultural exchange, adaptation, and collaboration. Crossing these borders, she salvages key Arabic and French writings on alternative sexual practices from oblivion to give voice to a group that has long been silenced.

Crossing Borders

Essays on Literature, Culture, and Society in Honor of Amritjit Singh

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Author: Tapan Basu,Tasneem Shahnaaz

Publisher: Rowman & Littlefield

ISBN: 1611479002

Category: Social Science

Page: 376

View: 9328

Crossing Borders engages with the emergent field of borders studies, particularly in relation to North America, South Asia, and the transnational spaces they continue to embrace. While multicultural theory tends to emphasize specific and individual cultures, border studies examines the intersection of cultures and the resulting effects.

Crossing Borders

Stories and Essays about Translation

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Author: Lynne Sharon Schwartz

Publisher: Seven Stories Press

ISBN: 1609807928

Category: Language Arts & Disciplines

Page: 320

View: 6900

In Joyce Carol Oates’s story “The Translation,” a traveler to an Eastern European country falls in love with a woman he gets to know through an interpreter. In Lydia Davis’s “French Lesson I: Le Meurtre,” what begins as a lesson in beginner’s French takes a sinister turn. In the essay “On Translating and Being Translated,” Primo Levi addresses the joys and difficulties awaiting the translator. Lynne Sharon Schwartz’s Crossing Borders: Stories and Essays About Translation gathers together thirteen stories and five essays that explore the compromises, misunderstandings, traumas, and reconciliations we act out and embody through the art of translation. Guiding her selection is Schwartz’s marvelous eye for finding hidden gems, bringing together Levi, Davis, and Oates with the likes of Michael Scammell, Harry Mathews, Chana Bloch, and so many other fine and intriguing voices.

Crossing Borders, Reinforcing Borders

Social Categories, Metaphors, and Narrative Identities on the U.S.-Mexico Frontier

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Author: Pablo Vila

Publisher: University of Texas Press

ISBN: 0292757786

Category: Social Science

Page: 304

View: 6808

Along the U.S.-Mexico frontier, where border crossings are a daily occurrence for many people, reinforcing borders is also a common activity. Not only does the U.S. Border Patrol strive to "hold the line" against illegal immigrants, but many residents on both sides of the border seek to define and bound themselves apart from groups they perceive as "others." This pathfinding ethnography charts the social categories, metaphors, and narratives that inhabitants of El Paso and Ciudad Juárez use to define their group identity and distinguish themselves from "others." Pablo Vila draws on over 200 group interviews with more than 900 area residents to describe how Mexican nationals, Mexican immigrants, Mexican Americans, African Americans, and Anglos make sense of themselves and perceive their differences from others. This research uncovers the regionalism by which many northern Mexicans construct their sense of identity, the nationalism that often divides Mexican Americans from Mexican nationals, and the role of ethnicity in setting boundaries among Anglos, Mexicans, and African Americans. Vila also looks at how gender, age, religion, and class intertwine with these factors. He concludes with fascinating excerpts from re-interviews with several informants, who modified their views of other groups when confronted by the author with the narrative character of their identities.

Crossing Borders

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Author: Michael Ferris

Publisher: N.A

ISBN: 9781602643734

Category: Biography & Autobiography

Page: 132

View: 3202

Cultural misunderstandings, crazy and dangerous situations, inter-cultural friendships, love and disappointment and the excitement of exploring. "Crossing Borders" tells the story of living and becoming an adult in a foreign country away from friends and family. This narrative is not a simple travel log of pondering curiosities, it unites the weirdest, most interesting and funniest experiences from twelve years living abroad. The story starts out with the author's experiences of his first adventure in the heart of Europe-in German speaking Austria. Dreams of going to study at the Viennese Academy of Music go up in smoke when the protagonist fails the entrance exam. The protagonist not only ends up living in a mountain village in the Alps, but also discovers traits and virtues in his new Austrian friends that he never thought possible. From almost getting shot in Cairo, having his bride kidnapped on their wedding day, to getting blackmailed by a Moroccan snake charmer, each chapter takes the reader on an extraordinary cultural trip, a book for anyone who likes to travel, whether in their mind or reality.

Crossing Borders

International Women Students in American Higher Education

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Author: Dongxiao Qin

Publisher: University Press of America

ISBN: 9780761844846

Category: Education

Page: 226

View: 5687

This book explores the processes of self-understanding that take place in a group of Chinese women studying in universities in the United States. In the past few decades, there has been an increasing number of Chinese women attending U.S. universities, yet their psychological experiences within American culture have not been a focus of study by researchers in higher education. Those who crossed geographic, cultural, and psychological borders to study in the U.S. described their change as a basic psychological process called 'reweaving a fragmented self.' This book contributes to the educator's understanding of the diversity of international women's student experiences, expectations, and desires.

Mobility and Migration Choices

Thresholds to Crossing Borders

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Author: Martin van der Velde,Ton van Naerssen

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317095103

Category: Social Science

Page: 306

View: 8062

The crossing of national state borders is one of the most-discussed issues of contemporary times and it poses many challenges for individual and collective identities. This concerns both short-distance mobility as well as long-distance migration. Choosing to move - or not - across international borders is a complex decision, involving both cognitive and emotional processes. This book tests the approach that three crucial thresholds need to be crossed before mobility occurs; the individual’s mindset about migrating, the choice of destination and perception of crossing borders to that location and the specific routes and spatial trajectories available to get there. Thus both borders and trajectories can act as thresholds to spatial moves. The threshold approach, with its focus on processes affecting whether, when and where to move, aims to understand the decision-making process in all its dimensions, in the hope that this will lead to a better understanding of the ways migrants conceive, perceive and undertake their transnational journeys. This book examines the three constitutive parts discerned in the cross-border mobility decision-making process: people, borders and trajectories and their interrelationships. Illustrated by a global range of case studies, it demonstrates that the relation between the three is not fixed but flexible and that decision-making contains aspects of belonging, instability, security and volatility affecting their mobility or immobility.

Food Across Borders

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Author: Matt Garcia,E. Melanie DuPuis,Don Mitchell

Publisher: Rutgers University Press

ISBN: 0813592003

Category: Cooking

Page: 290

View: 4938

The act of eating defines and redefines borders. What constitutes “American” in our cuisine has always depended on a liberal crossing of borders, from “the line in the sand” that separates Mexico and the United States, to the grassland boundary with Canada, to the imagined divide in our collective minds between “our” food and “their” food. Immigrant workers have introduced new cuisines and ways of cooking that force the nation to question the boundaries between “us” and “them.” The stories told in Food Across Borders highlight the contiguity between the intimate decisions we make as individuals concerning what we eat and the social and geopolitical processes we enact to secure nourishment, territory, and belonging. Published in cooperation with the William P. Clements Center for Southwest Studies, Southern Methodist University..

Pilgrimage, Politics and Place-Making in Eastern Europe

Crossing the Borders

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Author: John Eade,Mario Kati?

Publisher: Routledge

ISBN: 1317080823

Category: Religion

Page: 204

View: 6848

Since the beginning of the anthropology of pilgrimage, scant attention has been paid to pilgrimage and pilgrim places in central, eastern and south-eastern Europe. Seeking to address such a deficit, this book brings together scholars from central, eastern and south-eastern Europe to explore the crossing of borders in terms of the relationship between pilgrimage and politics, and the role which this plays in the process of both sacred and secular place-making. With contributions from a range of established and new academics, including anthropologists, historians and ethnologists, Pilgrimage, Politics and Place-Making in Eastern Europe presents a fascinating collection of case studies and discussions of religious, political and secular pilgrimage across the region.